EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
20-Apr-2014 14:38
Eastern US Time
Kid-
Friendly Feature Stories
News for and About Kids
Games for Kids
Science Reporting for Kids E-mail List
Links and Resources
About the Science Reporting for Kids Portal
DOE Resources
for Kids
NIH Resources
for Kids

Science Reporting for Kids RSS feed RSS
Funding

Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 111-120 out of 1081.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 25-Mar-2013
Museum exhibit developed at Harvard SEAS puts evolution at visitors' fingertips
Visitors to the Harvard Museum of Natural History in Cambridge, Mass., and three other US museums can experience and interact with a computerized tabletop exhibit that teaches them about evolution and the history of life on Earth. The result of a three-year project funded by the National Science Foundation, the multitouch surface and programming allow museum visitors to zoom and scroll through the Tree of Life, the immense tree diagram biologists use to represent the evolutionary history of millions of related species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 20-Mar-2013
Journal of School Nursing
Teen mentors inspire healthier choices in younger children
The results of an eight-week clinical trial conducted by Ohio State University researchers suggest that school systems could consider using teen mentors to instruct younger children in select health-related programs.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Laureen Smith
Smith.5764@osu.edu
614-292-4578
Ohio State University

Public Release: 20-Mar-2013
Computers predict basketball national championship
When Georgia Tech opens the doors to the Georgia Dome next month as the host institution for the 2013 Final Four, expect third-seeded Florida to walk out as the national champion. That's the prediction from Georgia Tech's Logistic Regression/Markov Chain college basketball ranking system, a computerized model that has chosen the men's basketball national champ in three of the last five years.

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Mar-2013
Food and Nutrition Sciences
College kids who don't drink milk could face serious consequences
College-age kids who don't consume at least three servings of dairy daily are three times more likely to develop metabolic syndrome than those who do, said a new University of Illinois study. "That alarming finding means that three-fourths of the 18- to 25-year-old college applicants surveyed are at risk for metabolic syndrome ," said Margarita Teran-Garcia, a U of I professor of food science and human nutrition.
US Department of Agriculture, and more

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 14-Mar-2013
How can we stlil raed words wehn teh lettres are jmbuled up?
Researchers in the UK have taken an important step towards understanding how the human brain 'decodes' letters on a page to read a word. The work, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, will help psychologists unravel the subtle thinking mechanisms involved in reading, and could provide solutions for helping people who find it difficult to read, for example in conditions such as dyslexia.
Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Press Office
Pressoffice@esrc.ac.uk
Economic & Social Research Council

Public Release: 5-Mar-2013
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Boys are right-handed, girls are left...
Well at least this is true for sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), finds an article in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, and shows that handedness in marsupials is dependent on gender. This preference of one hand over another has developed despite the absence of a corpus collosum, the part of the brain which in placental mammals allows one half of the brain to communicate with the other.

Contact: Hilary Glover
hilary.glover@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22370
BioMed Central

Public Release: 4-Mar-2013
New American Chemical Society video explains why cats lack a sweet tooth
Do cats purrr-ferrr sardines or sweets? The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, today released a new Bytesize Science video that explains why cats, unlike humans and other mammals, are indifferent to sweet flavors.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 28-Feb-2013
Current Biology
Action video games boost reading skills
Much to the chagrin of parents who think their kids should spend less time playing video games and more time studying, time spent playing action video games can actually make dyslexic children read better. In fact, 12 hours of video game play did more for reading skills than is normally achieved with a year of spontaneous reading development or demanding traditional reading treatments.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 26-Feb-2013
American Chemical Society podcast: New super-nutritious puffed rice for breakfast cereals, snacks
The latest episode in the American Chemical Society's award-winning Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions podcast series reports a new process for blowing up grains of rice to produce a super-nutritious form of puffed rice, with three times more protein and a rich endowment of other nutrients. That makes it ideal for breakfast cereals, snack foods and nutrient bars for school lunch programs.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 25-Feb-2013
Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization
Gender gap disappears in school math competitions, study shows
The idea that boys are better at math and in competitions has persisted for a long time -- primarily because of the competition format. A new study shows that competitions that extend beyond a single round result in parity between the sexes.

Contact: Joe Hadfield
joe_hadfield@byu.edu
801-422-9206
Brigham Young University

Showing releases 111-120 out of 1081.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

GAMES FOR KIDS!


Play now >>