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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 831-840 out of 1137.

<< < 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 > >>

Public Release: 6-Apr-2006
Conservation Biology
Monkey-dung study offers clues about land-use, wildlife ecology
Fecal matter of red colobus monkeys collected in western Uganda has yielded a wealth of knowledge about human land-use change and wildlife health and conservation. The main lesson, researchers say, is that the intensity of tree removal translates directly to parasite populations and the risk of infection of their hosts.
National Center for Environmental Research, Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation, Ford Foundation, Wildlife Conservation Society

Contact: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
jebarlow@uiuc.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 6-Apr-2006
Power of speech drives military vehicles
Speech recognition specialist VoxGen has been selected to add speech interface technology to a system, developed for the Department of Defense by Rochester Institute of Technology, which provides for effective maintenance, operations, and engineering support for commercial and military vehicles. Speech technology will enhance the vehicle preventative maintenance inspections, and will also guide personnel through complex troubleshooting and maintenance procedures.

Contact: Will Dube
will.dube@cims.rit.edu
585-475-2816
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Apr-2006
Journal of Paleontology
Lost photos confirm fossil find
The researcher who discovered Paralititan stromeri, one of the most massive animals ever to walk the Earth, now is "picture-positive" about another dinosaur fossil find by a famous German researcher, Ernst Stromer. In a recent issue of the Journal of Paleontology , Washington University's Josh Smith reports the rediscovery of two photographs of the holotype of Spinosaurus aegyptiacus as it was reposited in the Palaontologische Staatssammlung Munchen prior to 1944, and later presumably lost in a bombing.

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 5-Apr-2006
We're going on a planet hunt
A fifth terrestrial planet may once have orbited between Mars and Jupiter, according to recent simulations by US researchers. Gravitational disturbances would have sent the fifth planet either into the sun or out of the solar system altogether long ago. But the researchers believe there is evidence today in an asteroid belt which shows some memory of this long-gone planet.

Contact: Claire Bowles
claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk
44-207-611-1210
New Scientist

Public Release: 4-Apr-2006
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Main Meeting at the University of Kent, Canterbury
Northern birds are fatter!
"The further birds migrate north for the summer, the faster they put on weight," says Dr Williams (Simon Fraser University, Canada) who has been tracking migrating birds for several years. "This research may have implications for the designation of protected areas which will ensure birds can complete their spring and autumn migrations." Williams will report his research on Western Sandpipers, which migrate from Mexico to Alaska.

Contact: Lucy Moore
l.moore1@lancaster.ac.uk
786-664-7434
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 4-Apr-2006
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Main Meeting at the University of Kent, Canterbury
Modelling virtual dogs: It's a walk in the park!
Dog walking is a national pastime, but how does your dog walk? Different breeds have different gaits, for example greyhounds tend to be thin and fast whilst labradors are thicker set and tend to waddle. Dr Jim Usherwood from the Royal Veterinary College in London explains how he is using computers to simulate the way dogs walk, helping scientists understand the mechanics behind walking problems such as hip dysplasia.

Contact: Vicky Just
v.just@lancaster.ac.uk
788-770-7393
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 4-Apr-2006
Experimental Biology 2006
How low can you go? Ants learn to limbo
Have you ever tried to do the limbo? For ants it's a way of life! Tobias Seidl from the University of Zurich will be presenting his findings that ants are able to learn how to visually judge the height of horizontal barriers so that they can successfully crawl under it without slowing down.

Contact: Vicky Just
v.just@lancaster.ac.uk
788-770-7393
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 4-Apr-2006
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Main Meeting at the University of Kent, Canterbury
Salmon go veggie to save wild fish stocks
Salmon, like humans, require omega-3 fatty acids in their diet to function healthily. With wild marine fish stocks on the decline, feeding salmon with pellets made from fish such as anchovy is unsustainable in the long term. Scientists from the University of British Columbia will explain how this problem could be solved by replacing anchovy oil with canola oil (also known as rapeseed oil) in the diets of salmon.

Contact: Vicky Just
v.just@lancaster.ac.uk
788-770-7393
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 31-Mar-2006
American Naturalist
Why is the ground brown?
Ecologists have long asked, Why is the world green? In other words, why aren't herbivores, such as insects and grazing animals, more successful at eating the world's green leaves, also known as plant biomass? In the May 2006 issue of American Naturalist, Steven D. Allison (University of California, Irvine) asks the same questions a different way: Why is the ground brown? Why don't the organisms that break down the carbon in the soil consume it all?

Contact: Suzanne Wu
swu@press.uchicago.edu
773-834-0386
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Mar-2006
Saved by 'sand' poured into wounds
QuikClot is a sand-like material developed for the military which when poured into a wound can stop bleeding within seconds - saving lives. New advances in this material and the development of new substances could soon see blood clotting treatments being acceptable for ambulance crews, surgeons or ultimately to use by individuals at home in their first aid kits.

Contact: Claire Bowles
claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk
44-207-611-1210
New Scientist

Showing releases 831-840 out of 1137.

<< < 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 > >>

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