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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 871-880 out of 1128.

<< < 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 > >>

Public Release: 7-Feb-2006
Cell Metabolism
Studies of obese children reveal body-weight control hormone
A single change in a particular brain hormone can increase a person's risk of obesity, two new studies in the February 8, 2006, Cell Metabolism reveal. The researchers found that obese children are more likely to carry a rare variant of so-called -melanocyte-stimulating hormone (-MSH) than children of normal weight.
Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, National Institutes of Health, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Heidi Hardman
hhardman@cell.com
617-397-2879
Cell Press

Public Release: 6-Feb-2006
Pediatrics
Home paper shredders pose serious injury risk to toddlers
As our environments change over time with technology, pediatric emergency specialists are continuously challenged to observe possible trends and prevent more injuries by educating the public. In a new case report published in the February issue of the journal Pediatrics, researchers at New York University School of Medicine discuss the serious injury risks posed by paper shredders, which have become increasingly common household items.

Contact: Jennifer Choi
jennifer.choi@nyumc.org
212-404-3555
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 6-Feb-2006
Outbreak: Rapid appearance of fungus devastates frogs, salamanders in Panama
Something wicked this way comes, if you're a frog or salamander living near El Cope, Panama.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 6-Feb-2006
Pediatrics
Children with asthma more likely to have behavior difficulties
City children with asthma are more likely to have problems with behavior than children without the chronic respiratory problems, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study in this month's Pediatrics.
Halcyon Hill Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Generalist Physician Faculty Scholars Program

Contact: Heather Hare
heather_hare@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-2840
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Feb-2006
Respiratory Care
Some masks used in children's asthma treatment not effective, research shows
Some face masks commonly used to help young children inhale asthma medicine are not effective, according to a new study by researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The results are reported in the current issue of Respiratory Care.
Trudell Medical International

Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4453
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Feb-2006
Pediatrics
Study supports limiting television time for children
Children who spend more time watching television spend less time interacting with their family and playing creatively, report researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Harvard Children's Hospital in the journal Pediatrics. The researchers also found that older children who spent more time watching television spent less time on homework. Television did not interfere with reading or playing outdoors, though it is a commonly held belief that it interferes with these activities.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee Clippard
lclippard@mail.utexas.edu
512-232-0675
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 3-Feb-2006
The long research road to a new vaccine
The Food and Drug Administration today announced the licensing of a new vaccine against rotavirus, a disease responsible for tens of thousands of hospitalizations in the United States and hundreds of thousands of deaths around the world each year. The early research that underpins the new vaccine was conducted by three scientists at the Wistar Institute and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 1980 and 1991.

Contact: Franklin Hoke
hoke@wistar.org
215-898-3716
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 2-Feb-2006
Illegal trade is propelling rare turtle toward extinction, new report
A new report released today finds that the illegal trade in the Roti Island snake-necked turtle, found only on one island in Indonesia, has left it all but extinct in the wild. Exotic pet enthusiasts in Europe, North America and East Asia are fueling the illegal trade for the turtle, often without realizing that they are contributing to its demise. No legal trade of this species has been allowed since 2001.

Contact: Sarah Janicke
sarah.janicke@wwfus.org
202-778-9685
World Wildlife Fund

Public Release: 2-Feb-2006
MIT: Deep-sea robot photographs ancient Greek shipwreck
A team from MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute used an autonomous underwater vehicle to make a survey of a 4th-century B.C. Greek merchant ship that sank in the Aegean Sea. The robot accomplished in two days what would have taken divers years of effort. The researchers are releasing photographs showing detailed images of some of the ship's cargo lying on the ocean floor, where it's been since about 350 B.C.
Greek Ministry of Culture, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research

Contact: Denise Brehm
brehm@mit.edu
617-253-2704
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Feb-2006
Autonomous underwater vehicle maps ancient Greek shipwreck
After lying hidden for centuries off the coast of Greece, a sunken 4th century B.C. merchant ship and its cargo have been surveyed by an international team using a robotic underwater vehicle. The team accomplished in two days what it would take divers years to do. The project, the first in a new collaboration between US and Greek researchers, demonstrates the potential of new technology and imaging capabilities to rapidly advance marine archaeology.

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
sdawicki@whoi.edu
508-289-2270
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Showing releases 871-880 out of 1128.

<< < 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 > >>

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