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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 961-970 out of 1136.

<< < 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 > >>

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Society for Historical Archaeology Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology
Donner Party cannibalism legends remain unproven
The Donner Party used tea cups and other tableware and ate domestic and wild animals while stranded in the Sierra Nevadas during 1846-47, but all group members may not have resorted to cannibalism.

Contact: Mary Stanik
mstanik@uoregon.edu
541-346-3873
University of Oregon

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Journal of Studies on Alcohol
Early drinking in teens linked to alcohol use in movies
Seeing movies that feature characters drinking alcohol can predispose young adolescents to experiment with alcohol at an early age, concludes a study led by Dartmouth Medical School researchers. It is the first research study to measure the influence of alcohol use in movies and, using data from more than 600 films and 5,000 students, found that movies play a significant role in an adolescent's decision to drink at a young age.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Andy Nordhoff
mednews@dartmouth.edu
603-653-0784
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Penguins waddle but they don't fall down, UH researchers say
With their feathery tuxedoes and charming Chilly Willy-waddle, penguins are the quintessence of cute. Small wonder they're featured in Coke commercials, movies like "Madagascar" and "March of the Penguins" and children's toys galore. But one University of Houston professor is looking into a serious side of these ultra-cute creatures. Dozens of teeter-tottering penguins are the subjects of a research project investigating balance and locomotion, expected to help those with walking challenges.

Contact: Marisa Ramirez
Mramirez16@uh.edu
713-743-8152
University of Houston

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Journal of American College of Cardiology
Caloric restriction appears to prevent primary aging in the heart
Eating a very low-calorie yet nutritionally balanced diet is good for your heart. Studying heart function in members of an organization called the Caloric Restriction Society, investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that their hearts functioned like the hearts of much younger people. The researchers report their findings in the Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute; NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Whitaker Foundation; American Heart Association; Alan A and Edith L. Wolff Charitable Trust

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Crater drilling declared major success
Following three months of around-the-clock work, the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater Deep Drilling Project successfully completed its operations, extracting more than a mile-long segment of rocks and sediments from the Earth. On Dec. 4, the drill bit reached a final depth of 5,795 ft (1.1 miles, 1.77 kilometers) within the structure of the crater.
US Geological Survey, International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

Contact: Gregory Gohn
ggohn@usgs.gov
703-648-4382
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
American Astronomical Society
Cosmic battle creates Milky-Way sized tunnel
A team of astronomers is announcing today that they have discovered a giant Milky Way-sized tunnel filled with high energy particles in a distant galaxy cluster. These new findings are of special interest to astronomers as they may provide the missing evolutionary link necessary to understand the cycle of birth and death, as well as the environmental impact, of radio jets which result from ravenous supermassive black holes within giant galaxies.
NASA

Contact: NRL Public Affairs
nrl1030@ccs.nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Putting pedestrian safety in the driving seat
Every year in the European Union there are over 9,000 deaths and 200,000 injured victims in road accidents in which pedestrians and cyclists collide with a car. Hoping to improve on these grim statistics, is a cutting-edge sensing system that could ultimately help to save the lives of vulnerable road users (VRUs).
European Commission

Contact: Tara Morris
tmorris@gopa-cartermill.com
322-286-1985
IST Results

Public Release: 12-Jan-2006
Satellites see largest jet of particles created between Sun and Earth
A flotilla of space-weather satellites ESA's Cluster and NASA's ACE and Wind - observed for the first time steady large-scale jets of charged particles in the solar wind between the Sun and Earth.

Contact: Philippe Escoubet
philippe.escoubet@esa.int
31-715-653-223
European Space Agency

Public Release: 11-Jan-2006
New England Journal of Medicine
St. Jude projects 90 percent cure rate for ALL
The cure rate for the once almost universally fatal childhood cancer acute lymphoblastic leukemia could reach 90 percent in the near future, thanks to improvements in diagnosis and treatment over the past four decades, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Center Support Grant, ALSAC

Contact: Bonnie Kourvelas
bonnie.kourvelas@stjude.org
901-495-3306
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 16-Nov-2005
Netherlands Journal of Geosciences
Missing fossil link 'Dallasaurus' found
When amateur fossil finder Van Turner discovered a small vertebra at a construction site near Dallas 17 years ago, he knew the creature was unlike anything in the fossil record. Scientists now know the significance of Turner's fossil as the origin of an extinct line of lizards with an evolutionary twist: a land-dwelling species that became fully aquatic, Dallasaurus turneri.

Contact: Meredith Dickenson
mmdicken@smu.edu
214-768-7650
Southern Methodist University

Showing releases 961-970 out of 1136.

<< < 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 > >>

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