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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 971-980 out of 1114.

<< < 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 > >>

Public Release: 7-Jul-2005
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Identical twins may have more differences than meet the eye
Identical twins lose some fundamental similarities as they grow older, a new study reports. They may start to look and act less alike. The changes could leave one twin susceptible to diseases like cancer, while the other twin remains healthy.
Spanish Association Against Cancer

Contact: Christoph Plass
plass-1@medctr.osu.edu
614-292-6505
Ohio State University

Public Release: 4-Jul-2005
Journal of Neuroscience
How fish hear and make sounds at same time
Cornell University's Andrew Bass explains for the first time how the plainfin midshipman fish can hear its own voice and outside sounds at the same time.

Contact: Krishna Ramanujan
ksr32@cornell.edu
607-255-3290
Cornell University

Public Release: 4-Jul-2005
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Young children who watch less TV more likely to finish college
Children who watch the most television during childhood and adolescence may be less likely to finish school or go on to earn a university degree, according to a study in the July issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Contact: Robert J. Hancox, M.D.
bob.hancox@otago.ac.nz
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 4-Jul-2005
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
A TV in the bedroom is associated with lower standardized test scores among third grade students
In a study of third graders, children with a television in their bedrooms had lower scores on standardized tests while children with access to a home computer had higher scores, researchers report in the July issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Contact: Tim Parsons
410-955-6878
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Jun-2005
Geophysical Research Letters
NASA satellite data capture a big climate effect on tiny ocean life
New research found that phytoplankton population and size can change dramatically due to the physical processes associated with the climate phenomena known as El Niņo and La Niņa. In turn, these changes not only affect ocean ecology, but also influence our climate by impacting carbon storage in the ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.J.Gutro.1@gsfc.nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jun-2005
Journal of Consumer Research
Vanilla vs. rocky road
Why did our parents' crayon box only yield six colors while kids today are enjoying a dizzying 120?! The answer is in the naming: today's kids are scribbling away with "razzmatazz" and "tropical rain forest." This move towards ambiguous naming is extremely effective according to an article in the June 2005 issue of the Journal of Consumer Research.

Contact: Carrie Olivia Adams
coa@press.uchicago.edu
773-834-0386
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 2-Jun-2005
Journal of Consumer Research
Good, bad and indifferent
We each have that one flavor of jelly bean -- the one that we can consume endlessly in one sitting. Yet, there is another flavor that we eject from our mouths as soon as we taste it. Still, there are flavors that don't seem to illicit any significant responses whatsoever. Taken separately, eating jelly beans can be a very simple story: good, bad or indifferent. However, when we combine the three experiences into one, how do we rate the overall taste experience?

Contact: Carrie Olivia Adams
coa@press.uchicago.edu
773-834-0386
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-May-2005
American Geophysical Union Meeting
Solar fireworks signal new space weather mystery
The most intense burst of solar radiation in five decades accompanied a large solar flare on January 20. It shook space weather theory and highlighted the need for new forecasting techniques, according to several presentations at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting this week in New Orleans.
NASA

Contact: Rachel Weintraub
Rachel.A.Weintraub@nasa.gov
301-286-0918
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-May-2005
Scientists journey to southern Africa to unravel the secret world of elephant communication
Scientists have long known that seismic communication is common in small animals. But Stanford University biologist Caitlin O'Connell-Rodwell is the first to suggest that elephants and other large land animals are capable of sending and receiving vibrational messages through the ground. Now she and her colleagues are returning to Namibia to continue their decade-long study of how elephants use seismic signals to find mates, locate prey and establish territory.
Seaver Institute, Stanford University

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
831-915-0088
Stanford University

Public Release: 25-May-2005
Astronomers, amateur skywatchers find new planet 15,000 light years away
An international collaboration featuring Ohio State University astronomers has detected a planet in a solar system that, at roughly 15,000 light years from Earth, is one of the most distant ever discovered. In a time when technology is starting to make such finds almost commonplace, this new planet -- which is roughly three times the size of Jupiter -- is special for several reasons.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Andrew Gould
gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu
614-292-1892
Ohio State University

Showing releases 971-980 out of 1114.

<< < 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 > >>

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