EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
23-Apr-2014 20:55
Eastern US Time
Kid-
Friendly Feature Stories
News for and About Kids
Games for Kids
Science Reporting for Kids E-mail List
Links and Resources
About the Science Reporting for Kids Portal
DOE Resources
for Kids
NIH Resources
for Kids

Science Reporting for Kids RSS feed RSS
Funding

Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 1-10 out of 1206 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

18-Apr-2014
'Condor Watch' enlists public to help save California condors
Lead poisoning is a major cause of death for California condors, an endangered species. Scientists think photos taken by motion-activated cameras at condor feeding sites could give them clues about how lead poisoning spreads. But they have too many photos to analyze by themselves and have launched a web site to get help from the public.

Contact: Daizaburo Shizuka
dshizuka2@unl.edu
402-472-1544
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

17-Apr-2014
How to discover species (without killing them)
It's no surprise that newly discovered species (or even 'rediscovered' species that researchers had thought were extinct) often come from small, isolated populations. This fact means that these new species are already at risk -- but museums and private collectors can make these species' situation even worse, according to the authors of a Perspective article in this week's issue of Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Apr-2014
Why you couldn't hide your spaceship in a nebula
You can't always believe what you see on TV; Star Trek, Star Wars and BattleStar: Galactica have all shown spaceships hiding inside thick, gassy nebulas in space. But this isn't quite realistic -- find out why.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

12-Apr-2014
Solving the mystery of massive star birth
Like people, stars are born, they grow old and they die. Small and medium-sized stars, we know, are born in enormous clouds of cold gas and cosmic dust known as nebulae. But what about the most massive stars? Scientists think they've found a clue to help us solve the mystery of massive star birth.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

10-Apr-2014
How flies escape the swatter
Anyone who's ever swatted at a fly knows how fast the small, winged insects can be. Now, a new study shows how flies are able to make such quick escapes -- and the way they do it is not what researchers had expected.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Apr-2014
Diamonds in the sky
Using the Very Large Telescope in Chile, astronomers have captured this priceless photograph of what looks remarkably like a diamond engagement ring! Take a look...

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

7-Apr-2014
Students quantify school lunch nutrition and taste in Moody's Mega Math Challenge
East Coast schools dominated the top entries in Moody's Mega Math Challenge, which this year required participants to provide viable solutions to issues faced by schools across the country that are struggling to implement new lunch guidelines mandated by the USDA. Teams from Delaware, Florida, Indiana, New Jersey, and North Carolina will compete for top prizes at the contest's final event on April 28.

Contact: Karthika Muthukumaraswamy
karthika@siam.org
267-350-6383
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

3-Apr-2014
Whales and butterflies: The migration effect
What do a 40-ton whale and near-weightless butterfly have in common? They both migrate every year, along with billions of other animals like ducks, turtles and moths. Now, a new study in the April 4 issue of the journal Science explains how important migration is to shaping ecosystems on Earth.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Apr-2014
Nature's nasty side
This beautiful new photograph from one of the European Southern Observatory's powerful telescopes in the Chilean desert shows a pair of galaxies slowly dancing around each other in space. But, like many things in nature, the large, glowing galaxy in the picture is beautiful, but dangerous -- a real 'galactic bully.'

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

31-Mar-2014
Rings around an asteroid
The rings of Saturn are one of the most spectacular sights in the sky. Less striking rings have also been found around all the other giant planets in our solar system -- Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune. But despite many careful searches, no rings had been found around smaller objects in the solar system -- until now.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

Showing stories 1-10 out of 1206 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

GAMES FOR KIDS!


Play now >>