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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 1021-1030 out of 1263 stories.
<< < 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 > >>

5-Oct-2006
Shell fossils tell life came out of the tropics
Researchers studied 11 million years worth of shell fossils and learned that the tropics are where new types of life -- called species -- begin and old species continue to live.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Sep-2006
Parasite plants 'sniff' out their new homes
"Witches' shoelaces," "hairweed," "devils hair," "devilguts": These are all nicknames for the dodder plant, which winds around other plants and sucks out nutrients and water. Large numbers of dodder plants looks like a big tangle of hair smothering their host plants.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Sep-2006
Tropical forest animal tracking featured at nsf.gov
A new interactive web site from the U.S. National Science Foundation features movies, researcher interviews and animal facts from several animal tracking technology projects.

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
20-278-620-948-216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

21-Sep-2006
Why sleep? Flies tell us why
Sleep is a mystery. Scientists do not know why we need sleep. But, adults know they need sleep and parents know children need sleep. Other living beings need sleep.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Sep-2006
Oldest writing in the new world
While digging in a gravel quarry in Mexico, workers found a stone block that researchers believe has the oldest writing in the New World carved into it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Sep-2006
Opportunity Rover on Mars keeps going and going
Imagine having a robot with a transformer-like tool that you can send to a distant planet. It could send back photos so you could see that planet's landscape and provide you information about the rocks it finds because the transformer can open up rocks and test what is inside.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Aug-2006
Race, stereotypes and school performance
A 15-minute writing exercise at the beginning of the seventh-grade school year improved African-American students' grades at the end of the semester, researchers report.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Aug-2006
Teen researcher seeks a better way to treat tuberculosis
While still a senior in high school, a Baltimore teenager worked 10 hours a week in a Johns Hopkins University engineering lab, helping to develop a new drug delivery system that could someday reduce tuberculosis deaths in impoverished nations.

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-287-9960
Johns Hopkins University

24-Aug-2006
Johns Hopkins astronomers react to Pluto's planetary 'demotion'
Several Johns Hopkins University astronomers describe the decision to strip Pluto of its planetary status as a "muddled" ruling that is unlikely to settle ongoing debates over how to define a planet and whether the term should apply to Pluto. In an informal poll, only one astronomer was pleased to hear about Pluto's new status.

Contact: Dennis O'Shea
dro@jhu.edu
443-287-9960
Johns Hopkins University

24-Aug-2006
Nibbled leaf fossils and prehistoric bugs
If you give the same kind of pizza to a group of kids, some kids might just eat the cheese, some might pick off the pepperoni, others might leave the crusts. Afterward, the plates of leftovers would look pretty different from each other.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 1021-1030 out of 1263 stories.
<< < 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 > >>

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