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Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 1041-1050 out of 1258 stories.
<< < 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 > >>

20-Jun-2006
Satellites show blind people the way
For blind people, finding their way around a city and arriving safely at their destination is far from easy. However, a new system based on data from navigation satellites may soon offer help for the visually impaired. Recent trials in Madrid have shown the value of the portable device for giving directions to the blind.

Contact: Karina De Castris
karina.de.castris@esa.int
39-069-418-0844
European Space Agency

20-Jun-2006
Fresh frozen people?
A new scientific study suggests that many years in the future, it may be possible to freeze people who have incurable diseases and unthaw them when cures are available.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

20-Jun-2006
Bacteria can protect metal
Bacteria, also known as germs, have a bad reputation. They can spoil milk and can cause diseases. But University of Southern California researcher Florian Mansfield has found that one kind of bacteria has a remarkable and potentially very useful power: it can protect metal from corrosion.

Contact: Eric Mankin
mankin@usc.edu
213-821-1887
University of Southern California

15-Jun-2006
Digging up the super great-granddaddy of ducks
There were lots of dinosaurs in China 110 million years ago, but did you know that there were also lots of birds? Some of these birds looked like feathered dinosaurs, but some of them looked a lot like birds we see flying around today. This week, scientists from China and the United States will show the world some very old fossils of a bird called Gansus that might have been the super-great-granddaddy of ducks.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Jun-2006
When good mice go bad: Genetics center Web site makes science of addiction easy to understand
Mice on drugs make a cheesy sight -- but they also provide an entertaining and easy way to learn about the science of addiction at a new, interactive Web site developed by the Genetic Science Learning Center at the University of Utah.

Contact: Louisa Stark
lstark@genetics.utah.edu
801-585-3470
University of Utah Health Sciences

8-Jun-2006
A step toward robots with a human touch
What if you could build a robot someday whose hands had a sense of touch like human hands do? Maybe this ability would help robots tie shoes or build a house of cards -- or perform surgery in the hospital.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Jun-2006
A sea otter-shaped rubble pile in space
True to its name, the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa, which means "falcon" in Japanese, hovered over the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa last fall, taking up-close measurements and photographs. Then it swooped down for a brief landing and the first-ever sample attempt on an asteroid.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-May-2006
What do you want to be when you grow up?
What do you want to be when you grow up? Do you want to be an astronaut? Or perhaps you want to be a doctor or nurse? Or even a biology teacher? According to researchers, eighth graders who are interested in math and science are more likely to major in a science when they go to college.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-May-2006
Do apes plan ahead?
When you pack your suitcase for a trip to the beach this summer, what kinds of stuff will you bring?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-May-2006
Tackling the shortage: UH gets good 'grade' in recruiting engineers
The University of Houston is addressing the shortage of engineers facing the United States by tackling a related problem the lack of women in engineering. In its fourth year, GRADE (Girls Reaching and Demonstrating Excellence) Camp is hoping to change that and its organizers say the camp is making a difference. GRADE Camp is for high school girls entering grades nine through 12 and offers four, one-week sessions in June and July.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Showing stories 1041-1050 out of 1258 stories.
<< < 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 > >>

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