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Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 1091-1100 out of 1271 stories.
<< < 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 > >>

5-Jan-2006
Archaeologists bring Egyptian excavation to the Web
Egyptologist Betsy Bryan and her crew are once again sharing their work with the world through an online diary, a digital window into day-to-day life on an archaeological dig.

Contact: Amy Lunday
amylunday@jhu.edu
443-287-9960
Johns Hopkins University

22-Dec-2005
Water in the trunk of a tree
Every December, people cut down pine trees and other evergreens and stick them in their houses. The trees start sucking up water right away (unless you wait too long between cutting the tree and putting it in water, of course). A new study helps to explain how the heck water moves up the trunk of cone-making trees called "conifers."

Contact: Science Press Package
202-326-6400
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Dec-2005
Aquarium fish and human skin color
Zebrafish, tiny aquarium fish with stripes on their sides, have helped scientists explain in terms of genetic makeup the variety of colors that human skin comes in.

Contact: Science Press Package
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Dec-2005
When did 'pet rocks' and 'wild rocks' become cool?
"Pet rocks" became cool in 1975 -- they suddenly seemed like the perfect low-maintenance pet, and almost instantly, people were buying pet rocks like crazy. You could teach a pet rock to sit and play dead instantly!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Dec-2005
Water on Mars but not a drop to drink
The surface of Mars is now as dry as a desert, but new results from ESA's Mars Express confirm that water has played an important role in the planet's history. The spacecraft's sensitive instruments confirm that the arid Red Planet was once much wetter, and that water ice is probably widespread beneath the surface.

Contact: Karina De Castris
karina.de.castris@esa.int
39-069-418-0844
European Space Agency

1-Dec-2005
Earliest bird had dino-like feet
A new fossil discovery shows that the earliest birds had feet similar to those of theropod dinosaurs (the group of two-legged, meat-eating dinosaurs that includes T. rex). The new specimen provides important details about the feet and skull of these birds and strengthens the argument -- which many but not all scientists agree on -- that modern birds arose from theropod dinosaurs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Nov-2005
Postcards from Venus: Enter the Planetary Society Art Contest
ESA's Venus Express mission will be the first spacecraft in more than 10 years to visit our nearest planetary neighbour. To celebrate a new phase of exploration of Earth's sister world, the Planetary Society has teamed with ESA to invite youths and adults worldwide to enter the Venus Express Art Contest.

Contact: Karina De Castris
karina.de.castris@esa.int
39-069-418-0844
European Space Agency

24-Nov-2005
New 'time machine' from ice
Thanks to air bubbles trapped in a long cylinder of ice from a glacier in Antarctica, scientists have jumped an extra 210,000 years back in time. This scientific "time machine" now tells us how much carbon dioxide and methane was in the air as far back as 650,000 years ago.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Nov-2005
Countdown for Europe's latest weather eye
Europe's newest weather satellite is being prepared for launch aboard an Ariane 5 rocket on 21 December.

Contact: Karina De Castris
karina.de.castris@esa.int
39-069-418-0844
European Space Agency

17-Nov-2005
What do butterfly wings and TV screens have in common?
Many of the gadgets we use every day work by controlling the movement of light waves. CD and DVD players use lasers to read information off disks, allowing us to listen to music or watch movies. Optical fibers carry information signals long distances, in the form of light, allowing telephones and other devices to "talk" to each other.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 1091-1100 out of 1271 stories.
<< < 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 > >>

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