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23-Apr-2014 15:57
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 111-120 out of 1206 stories.
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10-Jul-2013
The biggest baby in our galaxy
Using the giant radio telescope, ALMA, astronomers have found the biggest cosmic "womb" ever seen in our galaxy! The womb is actually a giant dust cloud that is collapsing down to form a new star. When it finally gives birth the "baby" will be a star that is 100 times bigger than our sun!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

4-Jul-2013
So you think you're sitting still?
Chances are that you are sitting down right now. It might feel like you are sitting still, but right this very second, you are zooming through space at speeds that make the fastest rocket look like its moving at a snail's pace! Not only does the Earth rotate, our galaxy is turning, too! Now astronomers have observed what spins galaxies around -- it's material falling onto them from surrounding reservoirs of material that encase them like thick blankets.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

4-Jul-2013
The origin of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent
Fossilized plant remains at an archaeological site in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains in Iran are telling researchers that the early inhabitants of the region began farming cereal grains, like barley and wheat, sometime between 12,000 and 9,800 years ago.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Jul-2013
NASA's GPM mission announces anime contest winners
She can evaporate water with her hair. He measures all the rainfall and snowfall on Earth. Selected as the winners of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Anime Challenge, these two characters will star in their own comic series to help teach the public about precipitation science and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission.

Contact: Ellen Gray
Ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

2-Jul-2013
Start your engines -- student competition inspires teamwork and innovation
In a race against one another and the clock, robotic boats will battle it out at the 6th International RoboBoat Competition, slated for July 8-14. The Office of Naval Research-co-sponsored competition will take place on a pond at the Founder's Inn and Spa in Virginia Beach, Va. The event will feature 15 student teams racing their custom-designed and built boats in a mission consisting of three sets of tasks -- one mandatory and two optional.

Contact: Peter Vietti
ONRPublicAffairs@navy.mil
703-588-2167
Office of Naval Research

27-Jun-2013
Class with Web-based and hands-on experiments wins Science prize
As a young student in Estonia, Margus Pedaste was very interested -- and quite brilliant -- in biology. When he was in the seventh grade, for instance, he conducted his first real research. And by the time he graduated from high school he had already won his country's annual biology "olympiad" three times.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Jun-2013
Goldilocks and the 3 planets
We call the area around a star where the temperature is "just right" for water to exist, the "Goldilocks Zone." These zones are not too cold, so that the water freezes, and not too hot, so that it boils away. These are just the right conditions for life to exist. Now, astronomers have discovered a record-breaking planet system around a distant star -- it hosts three planets that are sitting snugly in the Goldilocks Zone!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

21-Jun-2013
The atlas of peculiar galaxies
In 1966, an astronomer called Halton Arp decided to catalog the misfits galaxies, so he created the "Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies." He chose his targets based on their weird appearances, but it wasn't until later that astronomers realized that many of these oddballs were actually galaxies crashing into each other and merging together! Here's two of them, can you see a penguin guarding its egg in their distorted shapes?

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

21-Jun-2013
The greedy monster in a dusty blanket
Black holes are known for sucking in anything unlucky enough to stray too close. Even light can't escape their unbelievably strong gravitational pull. And once something has been pulled in, it never escapes! So, how is it astronomers have just observed a black hole blowing material away?!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

20-Jun-2013
Available now in 3-D: The world's most detailed brain map
Your brain's microscopic nooks and crannies are now on display in 3-D, offering scientists a priceless tool in their quest to better understand how brain shape contributes to human behavior and health.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 111-120 out of 1206 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

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