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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 1131-1140 out of 1277 stories.
<< < 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 > >>


21-Jul-2005
History's greatest comet hunter
From time to time a bright comet with long, trailing tails becomes visible with the naked eye.

Contact: Erica Rolfe
erica.rolfe@esa.int
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

18-Jul-2005
Name that elephant!
World Wildlife Fund today invited elephant lovers to help name a Borneo pygmy elephant that will be part of the first study ever conducted on the pint-sized pachyderms.

Contact: Sarah Janicke
sarah.janicke@wwfus.org
202-778-9685
World Wildlife Fund

14-Jul-2005
Special delivery: How seabirds bring pollution to the Arctic
The arctic landscape is beautifully pristine. You won't see many factories, highways or other signs of industrial civilization. So why do researchers keep finding high levels of pollution there?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Jul-2005
ESA assists sun-powered aircraft
In 1999 Swiss adventurer Bertrand Piccard made the first non-stop balloon flight around the world.

Contact: Erica Rolfe
erica.rolfe@esa.int
PLOS

7-Jul-2005
Blind sea creature hunts with a light
The deep sea is a seriously dark place, so when a light shows up, even a tiny one, fish will swim up for a closer look. That seems to be the strategy behind the glowing red spots used by a relative of the jellyfish, called Erenna. Scientists have just discovered that these creatures have glowing red dots in their tentacles, which are probably used to lure fishy prey.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Jun-2005
Fluorescent bird poop haiku
Grass paths guide bluebirds. Fluorescent bird poop tells all. Corridor works, Yay! The fluorescent bird poop Haiku above, with its 5-7-5 syllable pattern, is almost as precisely structured as new research aimed at understanding how bluebirds move through grasslands and pine forest.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Jun-2005
Basketball + quantitative analysis = master's degree at the University of Cincinnati
At the conclusion of the 2003–04 National Basketball Association season, the Detroit Pistons, without one player among the NBA's top ten scoring leaders, found themselves atop the NBA with a championship ring. Conversely, Team USA, composed of the most individually talented players in the world, failed to win gold in the 2004 Olympics. How could this happen? Paul Bessire, a graduate student in UC's College of Business, thinks he has the answers.

Contact: Wendy Hart Beckman
wendy.beckman@uc.edu
513-556-1826
University of Cincinnati

24-Jun-2005
Bird code: what chickadees are really saying to each other
When a tiny chickadee songbird spots an owl, hawk, or other predator perched nearby, it makes a warning call that sounds like its name ("chick-a-dee-dee-dee"). Other chickadees within earshot then swarm together and mob the predator, usually harassing it so that it flies away.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Jun-2005
Carrying stuff on your head in the Himalayas
If you think hiking for an afternoon is a lot of work, imagine hiking for a week while carrying a pack from your head that weighs almost as much as you do.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Jun-2005
Meals for martians
Look around any supermarket and you will see thousands of different types of food. A typical café or restaurant may have a dozen or more items on the menu. But what will be eaten by the first astronauts who land on Mars?

Contact: Karina De Castris
karina.de.castris@esa.int
39-069-418-0844
European Space Agency

Showing stories 1131-1140 out of 1277 stories.
<< < 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 > >>


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