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Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 121-130 out of 1246 stories.
<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

26-Sep-2013
Neurons that make us eat too much?
Researchers have found a circuit in the mouse brain that makes the rodents eat even when they aren't hungry. And the same brain circuit prevents the mice from eating when they are hungry, they say. This network of neurons involves a region of the brain called the lateral hypothalamus, or LH, which controls some behaviors, like eating, and the researchers suggest that it might lead to new treatments for eating disorders and obesity in humans.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Sep-2013
The goddess of the hunt captures the prey
A new, extremely powerful space-camera combines the two extremes of astronomy: ancient mythology and modern technology. The camera, called "ArTeMiS," takes its name from ancient Greek mythology, but it's definitely futuristic in design, allowing to look at radio waves from space in more detail than ever before -- check out its first picture!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

19-Sep-2013
Arms in the gas of the Coma cluster
X-ray readings from the center of one of the nearest galaxy clusters, the Coma cluster, suggest that the clashing of gas particles expected throughout the cluster interior doesn't happen in the very center, a new study in the journal Science reports. There, the gas calms down enough to allow particles brought to the core from other galaxy clusters to stay intact.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Sep-2013
A sea of stars
When were looking at a picture of a distant cloud of space dust, how do we know which stars lie in front of it, which are inside it, and which are behind it? And for that matter, how do we measure how far away the cloud is? It's a tricky subject, but this week's Space Scoop tries to explain.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

16-Sep-2013
Molding young minds for Mars research goal of UH workshop
This year marks the 12th anniversary of the University of Houston Mars Rover Model Celebration and Exhibition. In September, UH will host workshops to prepare teachers for coaching their students through the planning and completion of operational rover models. Designed for Houston-area students in grades three through eight, this competition invites kids to design and construct Mars rover models. A $414,000 grant from NASA has led to substantial improvements in workshop content and curriculum materials.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

12-Sep-2013
Gears 'invented' by insects, not humans
Sometimes scientists study nature to learn new engineering tricks -- like the researchers who modeled the wing beats of flies to create tiny, flying robots. But, other times, scientists are surprised to learn that so-called "human inventions" have already existed in nature for a long time -- like the classic screw-and-nut-system, which existed in the legs of beetles long before we humans dreamt it up.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Sep-2013
To save species, more land needs protection
The Convention on Biological Diversity has set two goals -- among many others -- to be accomplished by 2020. They involve protecting 17 percent of the planet's land surface and conserving 60 percent of the plant species on such protected land. But, lately, researchers have wondered if both goals can be met at the same time.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Aug-2013
Old birds help teach younger birds to migrate
Many birds migrate thousands of miles each year to reach their breeding grounds. But how do they know where to go? For years, scientists have wondered how much of a bird's migration route is learned from experience -- and how much is passed on genetically. Now, researchers studying North American whooping cranes find that old birds help younger to stay on track and keep flying in a straight line to their destinations. So, social learning among whooping cranes is important, they say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Aug-2013
The future's bright
What will the sun be like in 4 billion years? Without a time machine that's a tricky question to answer. But by looking at stars very similar to our sun, only with different ages, we get an idea of what the sun used to be like, and what it will be like in the future. Take a look what they found when they looked at a sun-like star that's twice its age.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
roberts@strw.leidenuniv.nl
31-715-278-419
Leiden University

22-Aug-2013
To fly, bees use a familiar mechanism
Researchers studying bumblebees -- and the specialized muscles that the insects use for flight -- have made a surprising discovery: Bees have simply improved upon an ancient muscle-contraction mechanism that was first used by vertebrates, rather than developing a new one altogether.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 121-130 out of 1246 stories.
<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

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