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Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 31-40 out of 142 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>


1-Oct-2014
Flock of space ducks caught on camera!
Using a large telescope in Chile, astronomers have spotted a flock of space ducks! Unless you have the eyes of a hawk, you'll need a telescope or pair of binoculars to see this cluster of stars. Or a photograph, like this one! This beautiful picture shows the Wild Duck Cluster.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

29-Sep-2014
'J' marks the spot for Rosetta's lander
When Rosetta left Earth 10 years ago it carried with it a little probe called Philae. Soon Philae will heads out on a mission of its own -- to become the first probe to land on the surface of a comet! Choosing a landing site on the unusually shaped comet has been a challenging task, but has now been decided that Philae will land on the head of the 'comet' at the so-called 'Site J'!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

25-Sep-2014
The solar system's water: Older than the sun
Where did the water in our solar system come from? For years, researchers have been debating whether it came from processes that took place after the sun was born, when the planets were just beginning to form -- or if it was created much earlier, before a cold cloud of gas even formed the sun. Now, it appears that researchers finally have an answer.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Sep-2014
Cosmic crashes get galaxies in a spin
For many years astronomers have believed that when two similar-sized spiral galaxies collide, they will mash together a type of galaxy called an elliptical galaxy. But, if this is correct, how are there still so many spiral galaxies in the universe. Just last week they finally found the answer!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

22-Sep-2014
Is Pluto a planet? The votes are in
What is a planet? For generations of kids the answer was easy. A big ball of rock or gas that orbited our sun, and there were nine of them in our solar system. But then astronomers started finding more Pluto-sized objects orbiting beyond Neptune. Then they found Jupiter-sized objects circling distant stars, first by the handful and then by the hundreds. Suddenly the answer wasn't so easy. Were all these newfound things planets?

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

18-Sep-2014
Blue oak trees unlock the secrets of California's current
Wind off the coast of California drives cool, nutrient-rich waters from the depths of the Pacific Ocean up to replace warm surface water in a process called coastal upwelling. Now, a new study shows that this upwelling off California's coast has become more variable over the past 60 years than almost any other time during the last 600 years.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Sep-2014
NASA Space Radiation School is totally radical
For many students, the idea of summer school is anything but inspiring. Students of the 2014 NASA Space Radiation Summer School might disagree. The students, experts in their respective fields of study, were recently immersed in three weeks of intense education, collaboration and perhaps most importantly, inspiration.

Contact: Laurie Abadie
laurie.j.abadie@nasa.gov
281-483-1985
NASA/Johnson Space Center

12-Sep-2014
The universe's lost lithium
Recent studies of star clusters beyond our galaxy have provided new insight into the mystery of the universe's lost lithium -- a chemical created just minutes after the birth of the universe in the Big Bang.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

11-Sep-2014
Younger species cope better with changing land
Researchers studying birds in Costa Rica have made an interesting discovery: older species, which have been evolving for a long time, go extinct much quicker than newer species, which haven't had as long to evolve, when forests are converted to farmland. This discovery shows how changing a landscape can actually change the tree of life by favoring certain species over others -- and it may help with conservation efforts in the future.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Sep-2014
Preparing students for Mars research goal of UH workshop
This year marks the 13th anniversary of the Mars Rover Model Celebration and Exhibition at the University of Houston. In September, UH will host workshops to prepare teachers for coaching their students through the planning and completion of operational rover models. Designed for Houston-area students in grades three through eight, this competition invites kids to design and construct Mars rover models.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Showing stories 31-40 out of 142 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>


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