EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
1-Sep-2014 22:07
Eastern US Time
Kid-
Friendly Feature Stories
News for and About Kids
Games for Kids
Science Reporting for Kids E-mail List
Links and Resources
About the Science Reporting for Kids Portal
DOE Resources
for Kids
NIH Resources
for Kids

Science Reporting for Kids RSS feed RSS
Funding

Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 31-40 out of 1261 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

18-Jun-2014
Fastest glacier ever!
The Jakobshavn Isbrĉ glacier has always been fast -- even in the 1990s it was considered to be one of the fastest moving glaciers in the world -- but American and German scientists have confirmed that it is now moving at almost four times its previous speed!

Contact: Bárbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

17-Jun-2014
Students create spacecraft during 15th annual Summer Science Camp
Middle school students are using the summer break to sharpen their math and science skills during the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp at the University of Houston. Former astronaut and UH alum Dr. Bernard Harris Jr. will be on hand to help the campers design model spacecraft capable of protecting an astronaut during a planetary landing.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

12-Jun-2014
Are isolated plant populations more prone to disease?
Researchers have generally believed that diseases spread quicker among densely clustered populations and slower among populations that are spread out. However, a new study of the weed, Plantago lanceolata, and a fungal pathogen, known as powdery mildew, which infects the weed, shows that highly connected plant populations -- those that are growing close together -- are more resistant to the powdery mildew than isolated populations of the plant.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jun-2014
Sensors help catfish 'see' in the dark
Researchers have discovered that the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicas, has sensors on the outside of its body that detect slight changes in the water's pH level. In other words, these sensors can help the fish tell if the water they're swimming in becomes a little more acidic or basic -- an ability that helps them hunt in dark, murky waters.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jun-2014
A journey to the edge of the universe
What happens when you point the Hubble Space Telescope to a seemingly empty patch of sky? You get a view that takes you to the edge of the universe!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
0044-292-087-5121
Leiden University

29-May-2014
Slowly removing invasive species spares the natives
Sometimes, getting rid of invasive species is harder than it sounds because native plants and animals come to rely on them for resources. Now, however, Adam Lampert and colleagues have come up with a new way to get rid of invasive species that also protects native species more effectively. But, it may take more time than traditional approaches, they say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-May-2014
UH team represents US in Microsoft Imagine Cup World Semifinals
University of Houston computer science students continue proving the UH game design program is one of the best in the nation and perhaps the world. Randal Staewen and Sean Howard, known as Team Solipsoid, are among three US teams advancing to the Microsoft Imagine Cup World Semifinals. Team Solipsoid will represent the US in the game design category.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

27-May-2014
Elastic young minds extend uses of rubber bands
Young inventors stretched their minds and rubber bands to make music, launch baseballs and split Oreos in the Sixth Annual Rubber Band Contest for Young Inventors. Two first-place winners were selected for their inventions.

Contact: Denise Henry
henryd@uakron.edu
330-972-6477
University of Akron

22-May-2014
Unexpected twist in evolution of flightless birds
Ratite birds, some of the largest flightless birds, live all over the world, and now a new study published in the May 23 issue of the journal Science suggests they spread so far over not because big landmasses split up, forcing their separation, but because their ancestors flew far and wide. It was only after separating, this study says, that most members of this group lost the ability to fly.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-May-2014
Fresh look at a young star cluster
If you're lucky enough to have enjoyed a really dark sky, far from the light pollution in cities and towns, you might have seen the Milky Way arching majestically across the night sky. Nine out of 10 people will never see this sight, because light pollution in towns and cities blocks out light from the stars. But this new photograph gives you a close up look at part of the Milky Way filled with hot, young stars.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

Showing stories 31-40 out of 1261 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

GAMES FOR KIDS!


Play now >>