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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 31-40 out of 1271 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

10-Jul-2014
Smaller plastic, bigger problem
Even very small fragments of plastic can be harmful to life in the ocean, according to a new Policy Forum in the July 11 issue of Science. In this Policy Forum, Kara Law and Richard Thompson explain the dangers of pieces of plastic smaller than a few millimeters, called microplastics.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Jul-2014
Astronomers clean up a dusty mystery
We are all made of material that was produced in the hearts of stars and catapulted throughout the universe when they come to the explosive end of their lives. How these materials survive and grow into larger clumps without being destroyed by the harsh environments in which they are created is a mystery. But we're now one step closer to finding out!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

7-Jul-2014
From antibiotics to yeast: Latest student science heads for space
Mission 5 of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on July 11. A total of 1,344 proposals yielded 15 selected investigations for the flight.

Contact: Laura Niles
Laura.E.Niles@nasa.gov
281-244-7069
NASA/Johnson Space Center

3-Jul-2014
Cosmic cloud seen from the highest and driest place on Earth
This new photograph of space was snapped using a large telescope based in one of the most extreme environments on Earth; a very dry and very remote region of Chile called the Atacama Desert. The area is so barren that it's often compared to the surface of Mars. Scientists even ran tests there that were later used on Mars landers to look for life -- and they didn't find anything!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

3-Jul-2014
Planet's signals are tricks created by starry noise
Regions of strong activity coming from stars have made scientists think they are planets, a new study reports in the July 4 issue of the journal Science reports, when in reality, they are not.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Jul-2014
Alaska, Canada, NYC researchers seeking citizen scientists for climate project
Researchers heading two citizen-science projects documenting the seasonal life events of plants in Alaska and in Churchill, on Hudson Bay in Canada, are looking for participants and timing is everything. The climate in the North is changing rapidly. Spring arrives earlier, summers are warmer, fall arrives later and these changes affect the timing of plants' life events such as leafing out, flowering, fruiting and dying -- called plant phenology.

Contact: Marie Thoms
methoms@alaska.edu
907-474-7412
University of Alaska Fairbanks

30-Jun-2014
When it rains, it pours ... on the sun
Just like on Earth, the sun has spells of bad weather, with high winds and showers of rain. But unlike the all-too-frequent storms on Earth, rain on the sun is not made of water but electrically charged, superheated gas, called plasma. And it falls at around 200,000 kilometers per hour from the sun's upper atmosphere called the corona, in thousands of gigantic droplets -- each one as big as a country!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

26-Jun-2014
Extra smells make finding flowers harder
Insects consume nectar from flowers. To find their favorite flowery snacks, they follow the odors flowers give off, but a new study in the June 27 issue of the journal Science reports that competing odors, including manmade ones, make this task harder for bugs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jun-2014
Relics of the early universe are dustier than expected
Until now, we haven't had telescopes powerful enough to peer into the distant cosmos to uncover the secrets of the biggest explosions in the universe -- gamma-ray bursts! But now, using the giant ALMA telescope, astronomers have managed to examine the environments around gamma-ray bursts and they've found that they're dustier than we expected!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

19-Jun-2014
Skulls with mix of traits shine light on human evolution
Researchers have analyzed the biggest collection of ancient human fossils ever recovered from a single excavation site. Their study in the 20 June issue of the journal Science sheds light on the origin and evolution of Neandertals, an extinct species of human.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 31-40 out of 1271 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

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