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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 61-70 out of 142 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>


2-Jul-2014
Alaska, Canada, NYC researchers seeking citizen scientists for climate project
Researchers heading two citizen-science projects documenting the seasonal life events of plants in Alaska and in Churchill, on Hudson Bay in Canada, are looking for participants and timing is everything. The climate in the North is changing rapidly. Spring arrives earlier, summers are warmer, fall arrives later and these changes affect the timing of plants' life events such as leafing out, flowering, fruiting and dying -- called plant phenology.

Contact: Marie Thoms
methoms@alaska.edu
907-474-7412
University of Alaska Fairbanks

30-Jun-2014
When it rains, it pours ... on the sun
Just like on Earth, the sun has spells of bad weather, with high winds and showers of rain. But unlike the all-too-frequent storms on Earth, rain on the sun is not made of water but electrically charged, superheated gas, called plasma. And it falls at around 200,000 kilometers per hour from the sun's upper atmosphere called the corona, in thousands of gigantic droplets -- each one as big as a country!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

26-Jun-2014
Extra smells make finding flowers harder
Insects consume nectar from flowers. To find their favorite flowery snacks, they follow the odors flowers give off, but a new study in the June 27 issue of the journal Science reports that competing odors, including manmade ones, make this task harder for bugs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jun-2014
Relics of the early universe are dustier than expected
Until now, we haven't had telescopes powerful enough to peer into the distant cosmos to uncover the secrets of the biggest explosions in the universe -- gamma-ray bursts! But now, using the giant ALMA telescope, astronomers have managed to examine the environments around gamma-ray bursts and they've found that they're dustier than we expected!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

19-Jun-2014
Skulls with mix of traits shine light on human evolution
Researchers have analyzed the biggest collection of ancient human fossils ever recovered from a single excavation site. Their study in the 20 June issue of the journal Science sheds light on the origin and evolution of Neandertals, an extinct species of human.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jun-2014
Fastest glacier ever!
The Jakobshavn Isbrĉ glacier has always been fast -- even in the 1990s it was considered to be one of the fastest moving glaciers in the world -- but American and German scientists have confirmed that it is now moving at almost four times its previous speed!

Contact: Bárbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

17-Jun-2014
Students create spacecraft during 15th annual Summer Science Camp
Middle school students are using the summer break to sharpen their math and science skills during the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp at the University of Houston. Former astronaut and UH alum Dr. Bernard Harris Jr. will be on hand to help the campers design model spacecraft capable of protecting an astronaut during a planetary landing.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

12-Jun-2014
Are isolated plant populations more prone to disease?
Researchers have generally believed that diseases spread quicker among densely clustered populations and slower among populations that are spread out. However, a new study of the weed, Plantago lanceolata, and a fungal pathogen, known as powdery mildew, which infects the weed, shows that highly connected plant populations -- those that are growing close together -- are more resistant to the powdery mildew than isolated populations of the plant.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jun-2014
Sensors help catfish 'see' in the dark
Researchers have discovered that the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicas, has sensors on the outside of its body that detect slight changes in the water's pH level. In other words, these sensors can help the fish tell if the water they're swimming in becomes a little more acidic or basic -- an ability that helps them hunt in dark, murky waters.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jun-2014
A journey to the edge of the universe
What happens when you point the Hubble Space Telescope to a seemingly empty patch of sky? You get a view that takes you to the edge of the universe!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
0044-292-087-5121
Leiden University

Showing stories 61-70 out of 142 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>


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