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Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 61-70 out of 142 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>


24-Jul-2014
Earth's disappearing animals
This week, a special issue of Science highlights humans' role in the recent extinctions of many species. There have been five mass extinction events on Earth, documented by the fossil record, and researchers say that the planet is currently in the midst of a 'sixth extinction wave.'

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Jul-2014
How long do stars last?
Imagine how strange it would be if members of your family aged at different rates. If your brother or sister looked like they were 70 years old, but your grandparents still looked as young as teenagers. This would be very unusual for people but it is really common for stars. All stars age at different rates, depending on how massive they are at the start their lives!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

22-Jul-2014
NJIT wins the New Jersey Apps Challenge
A mobile app created by NJIT students that gives middle and high school basketball teams a searchable database of performance statistics is the winner of the New Jersey Apps Challenge, an innovation contest initiated two years ago by former US Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) and the Federal Communications Commission.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

16-Jul-2014
Keeping the heart on beat
Scientists have figured out how to genetically tweak heart tissue to keep the heart beating normally. The findings appear in the July 16 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Jul-2014
Amid revelations of a universe rich with planets, what's next for exoplanet hunters?
In the midst of recent and surprising revelations about planets outside our solar system, three astrophysicists -- Zachory Berta-Thompson, Bruce Macintosh and Marie-Eve Naud -- joined a live Google Hangout to consider what's next for exoplanet hunters, including the search for other Earth-like worlds.

Contact: James Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
The Kavli Foundation

10-Jul-2014
Smaller plastic, bigger problem
Even very small fragments of plastic can be harmful to life in the ocean, according to a new Policy Forum in the July 11 issue of Science. In this Policy Forum, Kara Law and Richard Thompson explain the dangers of pieces of plastic smaller than a few millimeters, called microplastics.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Jul-2014
Astronomers clean up a dusty mystery
We are all made of material that was produced in the hearts of stars and catapulted throughout the universe when they come to the explosive end of their lives. How these materials survive and grow into larger clumps without being destroyed by the harsh environments in which they are created is a mystery. But we're now one step closer to finding out!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

7-Jul-2014
From antibiotics to yeast: Latest student science heads for space
Mission 5 of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on July 11. A total of 1,344 proposals yielded 15 selected investigations for the flight.

Contact: Laura Niles
Laura.E.Niles@nasa.gov
281-244-7069
NASA/Johnson Space Center

3-Jul-2014
Cosmic cloud seen from the highest and driest place on Earth
This new photograph of space was snapped using a large telescope based in one of the most extreme environments on Earth; a very dry and very remote region of Chile called the Atacama Desert. The area is so barren that it's often compared to the surface of Mars. Scientists even ran tests there that were later used on Mars landers to look for life -- and they didn't find anything!

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

3-Jul-2014
Planet's signals are tricks created by starry noise
Regions of strong activity coming from stars have made scientists think they are planets, a new study reports in the July 4 issue of the journal Science reports, when in reality, they are not.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 61-70 out of 142 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>


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