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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 81-90 out of 1258 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

5-Feb-2014
Math contest adds up to prizes, encourages STEM involvement
Hundreds of math-savvy teens will compete Saturday, Feb. 8, during the ninth annual University of Houston Mathematics Contest. The event is free to participants and open to students through grade 12. The organizers expect a turn out of 600 contestants from nearly 50 schools to test their mettle in math and vie for awards and prizes.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

5-Feb-2014
The asteroid with a heart of stone
Asteroids are awkward to photograph. But understanding what asteroids are made from will help us find out how our planet and solar system were made. Studying them can even keep us safe -- knowing where asteroids are and how they are moving means we'll know if one is on a crash-course with Earth! Now astronomers have a new trick to learn about them.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

30-Jan-2014
Chemical tricks in new hosts expand pathogen variety
A pathogen that has spent generations living comfortably in one host can leap to and successfully inhabit an entirely different one, and now a new report suggests the chemical changes it makes in the new host allow it to make this jump.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Jan-2014
Through the looking glass
The VST is a very special class of telescope, capable of take amazingly panoramic pictures of the night sky. See this stunning section of our galaxy -- the gigantic Lagoon Nebula.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

24-Jan-2014
Sleeping beauty wakes up from a deep-space slumber
Five-hundred million miles away, as it hurtles through space in the darkest reaches of our solar system, an alarm clock goes off. It wakes a small spacecraft from its two-and-a-half-year slumber. This little spacecraft is called Rosetta.

Contact: Sarah Eve Roberts
robertss38@cardiff.ac.uk
44-292-087-5121
Leiden University

23-Jan-2014
Nothing sees color like the mantis shrimp
Most mammals have two types of photoreceptors -- cells that convert light into electrical signals -- in their eyes. Humans and many other primates have three. Some birds and reptiles have four. Certain butterflies can even have six. But a crustacean, known as the mantis shrimp, which lives among colorful coral reefs, has 12 different types of photoreceptors in their eyes -- and researchers haven't understood why until now.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Jan-2014
Hundreds of Mars rover models to buzz around UH campus Jan. 25
Nearly 200 Mars rover models created by elementary and middle school students will arrive at the University of Houston Saturday, Jan. 25, at the 12th annual Mars Rover Model Celebration and Competition. The event hosts hundreds of contestants dressed up in their finest Martian and rocket scientist gear and is free for the public to attend. The contest offers hands-on projects that provide very true-to-life results, encouraging children to take learning beyond the textbook.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

16-Jan-2014
No speed limit for soil in New Zealand's mountains
Scientists working in the mountains of New Zealand report very fast rates of soil weathering, a new study in the Jan. 17 issue of the journal Science reports, contradicting previous studies that suggest mountainous soil weathering has a speed limit -- a rate at which it cannot go any faster.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Jan-2014
Strengthening female participation in STEM activities
High school subjects that connect the curriculum to the real world are those that best engage female students, a Carnegie Mellon University study shows. With coursework in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) often lacking relevance to students' lives, it is unsurprising that females represent a meager 24 percent of the STEM workforce, according to a factsheet from the Executive Office of the President.

Contact: Frank Kunkle
kunkle@siam.org
267-350-6388
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

15-Jan-2014
NJIT hosts regional science olympiad on Jan. 16
Hundreds of students representing 20 middle schools and 16 high schools from throughout Northern New Jersey will assemble at NJIT on Thursday, Jan. 16 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. to compete in the New Jersey Science Olympiad Regional Tournament. Teams will participate in events designed to make science, technology and math more enticing, relevant and exciting.


Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Showing stories 81-90 out of 1258 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

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