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Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 881-890 out of 1277 stories.
<< < 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 > >>


28-Feb-2008
Flying bats take cue from bugs
Bats use the same aerodynamic trick as flying insects do to stay aloft, scientists have discovered. When the bat wing flaps downward, the motion produces a tiny cyclone of air above the wing, called a "leading edge vortex," that pulls the animal upward. Researchers have known that insects create these vortices while flying, but they’ve wondered whether same thing works for larger, heavier animals like bats.

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Feb-2008
The Amazon jungle comes alive in the concrete jungle
Amazonia Brasil, a citywide event of exhibits and workshops that seeks to bring models of sustainable living from the Amazon and present a contemporary vision of the region, will take place from April 17 to July 13, its creators and presenters the Health and Happiness Project, the Amazon Working Group and Fare Arte announced today.

Contact: Michelle Shayo
michelle.shayo@edelman.com
212-819-4891
Edelman Public Relations

25-Feb-2008
Got a science question with no answer? Ask Dr. Bob
You're writing a research paper or you're teaching a high school science class and you're stumped -- you need an answer, and pronto. What to do? You ask Dr. Bob.

Contact: Keith Randall
keith-randall@tamu.edu
979-845-4644
Texas A&M University

21-Feb-2008
Bird poop -- the best disguise ever
Swallowtail caterpillars are masters of deception. In their early stages of life they look just like the black and white goo of bird droppings, and just before becoming butterflies they resemble the green leaves they live on. Scientists have now identified the hormone responsible for this change in appearance. They report their discovery in the Feb. 22 issue of the journal Science.

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Feb-2008
Jupiter and Saturn's siblings
Researchers have discovered two new planets outside our solar system, each with a mass less than that of Jupiter. The planets are orbiting a star about half the size of our sun.

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Feb-2008
Harnessing 'people power'
Researchers have created a device that looks like a knee brace, which converts the energy from a walking person’s moving leg into electricity.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Feb-2008
Perfect pair for Valentine's day: Roses and lemon-lime soda
Roses by the dozen are delivered to sweethearts across the nation on Valentine's Day. On Feb. 14 more than 150 million long-stemmed roses will be delivered to significant others. The meaningful gesture soon wilts, but according to a University of Missouri horticulturist some lemon-lime soda could breathe extra life into the beautiful bunch.

Contact: Jennifer Faddis
Faddisj@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

4-Feb-2008
Mystery of the shining fish -- solved at last!
Ever notice that cool, shimmering shine on fish scales in an aquarium or the supermarket? Scientists have now found the secret of that shine.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

31-Jan-2008
Exciting summer science camps for students and teachers at Canada's Perimeter Institute
Budding young physicists, age 16 and 17, can now apply to attend the International Summer School for Young Physicists at Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Contact: Julie Taylor
jtaylor@perimeterinstitute.ca
519-569-7600
Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

31-Jan-2008
What's seeping in the Lost City?
How do you turn a tree trunk into gas for your car? For the most part, our fuel comes from plants and animals that were buried deep in the Earth.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 881-890 out of 1277 stories.
<< < 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 > >>


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