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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 891-900 out of 1261 stories.
<< < 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 > >>

3-Jan-2008
Solving the mystery of an amazing belly flopper
Scientists in Korea have found an explanation for the water strider's "miraculous" ability to leap onto the surface of a pond or lake without sinking. Their finding solves a long-standing scientific mystery surrounding the mosquito-like insect.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

3-Jan-2008
Butterfly larvae fool ants into mothering them
Danish researchers have found that in some areas in their country, beautiful blue Alcon butterflies fool ants into raising the butterfly larvae instead of their own, a report explains. The reason? The butterflies have developed an outer coating that mimics that of the ants.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Dec-2007
Organizing the beetle files
When biologists set out to organize the family tree for the huge family of beetles, they ended up identifying previously unknown relationships for many of the beetle groups -- somewhat like finding new cousins -- and re-defining the major families, new research shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Dec-2007
Like a breath of fresh air
Across North America, a network of more than 90 towers called AmeriFlux monitors the daily breathing of forests, grasslands, and croplands. Professor Beverly Law of Oregon State University's College of Forestry is using tower data to try to find out whether ecosystems take in more carbon dioxide from the air than they release. This is an important question because carbon dioxide in the air from burning fossil fuels is the main culprit in global warming.

Contact: Beverly Law
bev.law@oregonstate.edu
Oregon State University

17-Dec-2007
The truth behind the reindeer that don't 'fly'
One night each year, nine magic reindeer pull Santa and his toy-filled sleigh around the world. But what about the reindeer who are not part of the 'deer dream team'? Dr. Perry Barboza is a physiologist who studies reindeer at the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska who says that some of the characteristics of the non-mythical reindeer get overlooked in the Christmas crush.

Contact: Christine Guilfoy
cguilfoy@the-aps.org
301-634-7253
American Physiological Society

17-Dec-2007
Physiologist offers Santa some tips for a cool ride
Santa Claus is well adapted to living in the subzero temperatures of the North Pole. But how will Santa cope with the heat when he travels to hot climates with his sleigh full of toys? Physiologist Lisa Leon, a physiologist who studies the body's physiological responses to heat, tells us how Santa can keep himself safe and comfortable -- and how we can help.

Contact: Christine Guilfoy
cguilfoy@the-aps.org
301-634-7253
American Physiological Society

14-Dec-2007
M3 challenge expands as enthusiasm grows
Moody's Mega Math Challenge is an Internet-based math competition for high school students that spotlights applied mathematics as a powerful problem-solving tool, as a viable and exciting profession, and as a vital contributor to advances in an increasingly technical society.

Contact: Jessica Stephenson
stephenson@siam.org
267-350-6383
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

14-Dec-2007
'Bald' peanuts: Tasty treats turn out to be healthy, too
Scientists are reporting that boiled peanuts contain four times as many disease-fighting agents called isoflavones as raw peanuts or oil- and dry-roasted peanuts.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

13-Dec-2007
Habitat split leads to biodiversity decline
Amphibians such as frogs are at risk, especially those that have to travel from their homes in forest habitats to aquatic areas to breed and back; and with this added risk, the diversity, or variety, of species declines, according to a new report. Traveling to the water to breed, then returning to the forest is called habitat split, and researchers say that it is usually caused by human activity.

Contact: SciPak
sciapk@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Dec-2007
World's smallest trophy to be awarded in NanoBowl Video Contest
The American Physical Society invites students to explain physics through football as part of the Physics Central NanoBowl video contest. The winning entry will receive the NanoTrophy, the smallest trophy ever made.

Contact: James Riordon
riordon@aps.org
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Showing stories 891-900 out of 1261 stories.
<< < 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 > >>

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