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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 911-920 out of 1269 stories.
<< < 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 > >>

5-Dec-2007
Students helping a university cut energy consumption
UC San Diego undergraduate students have designed, built and deployed a network of five weather-monitoring stations as a key step toward helping the university use ocean breezes to cool buildings and identify the sunniest rooftops for solar panels.

Contact: Rex Graham
ragraham@ucsd.edu
858-822-3075
University of California - San Diego

29-Nov-2007
In early human ancestor, growing up came late for males
If Paranthropus robustus -- a human ancestor that lived about 2 million years ago -- had gone to school dances, it would have been pretty awkward. New research shows that the males of this species matured much later in life than females.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Nov-2007
'Dragon's blood' slays germs
Scientists have recently found several compounds in dragon's blood that fight bacteria that cause indigestion, heartburn and nausea. This is a serious but common problem that affects about 60 million people in the United States each year.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

22-Nov-2007
A supercontinent that stayed put
For about 100 million years of Earth's history, from the Permian through the Jurassic periods, all of Earth's continents were actually joined as a single supercontinent, called Pangea ("pan-JEE-uh"). It began breaking up during the Jurassic, forming the continents Gondwanaland and Laurasia.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Nov-2007
'Roach-bots' guide cockroach swarms
When a handful of cockroach-like robots joined a group of real roaches, the roach-bots coaxed the whole group to behave in unusual ways, researchers report in a new study.

Contact: Scipak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Nov-2007
New world first type 1 diabetes technology
Glucoboy encourages children with type 1 diabetes to test their blood glucose levels by unlocking new characters and secret game levels available in one of five games.

Contact: Aaron Parnell
aaronp@diabetesnsw.com.au
Diabetes Australia

8-Nov-2007
Spadefoot toads break the rules in dry weather
Desert-dwelling animals have all kinds of clever tricks for surviving in their dry environments. This includes the spadefoot toad, which is named for the hard, pointy "spade" on its hind feet, which is used for digging.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Nov-2007
Calling all junior food detectives!
Kaiser Permanente just launched a first of its kind, free, interactive online video game that teaches kids to eat healthier foods, be more active and manage how much time they spend in front of the computer and television. Developed by the producer of the "SpongeBob SquarePants," "Monsters, Inc." and "Rugrats" video games, "The Incredible Adventures of the Amazing Food Detective" targets children ages 9-10 and is available in both English and Spanish.

Contact: Danielle Cass
Danielle.x.cass@kp.org
510-267-5364
Kaiser Permanente

1-Nov-2007
American Chemical Society debuts Bytesize Science -- a new podcast for young listeners
The American Chemical Society Office of Communications has launched the kid and teen-friendly Bytesize Science, a science podcast that aims to entertain as much as it educates.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

1-Nov-2007
They don't fly, they aren't lemurs, but colugos are our closest relative
Researchers have determined that colugos are the closest relative to primates, according to a Science research article. Humans belong to the biological order of primates along with apes, monkeys and lemurs. Knowing who we are related to allows researchers the opportunity to study how we primates evolved from our nearest relative.

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 911-920 out of 1269 stories.
<< < 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 > >>

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