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Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 911-920 out of 1275 stories.
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14-Dec-2007
M3 challenge expands as enthusiasm grows
Moody's Mega Math Challenge is an Internet-based math competition for high school students that spotlights applied mathematics as a powerful problem-solving tool, as a viable and exciting profession, and as a vital contributor to advances in an increasingly technical society.

Contact: Jessica Stephenson
stephenson@siam.org
267-350-6383
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

14-Dec-2007
'Bald' peanuts: Tasty treats turn out to be healthy, too
Scientists are reporting that boiled peanuts contain four times as many disease-fighting agents called isoflavones as raw peanuts or oil- and dry-roasted peanuts.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

13-Dec-2007
Habitat split leads to biodiversity decline
Amphibians such as frogs are at risk, especially those that have to travel from their homes in forest habitats to aquatic areas to breed and back; and with this added risk, the diversity, or variety, of species declines, according to a new report. Traveling to the water to breed, then returning to the forest is called habitat split, and researchers say that it is usually caused by human activity.

Contact: SciPak
sciapk@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Dec-2007
World's smallest trophy to be awarded in NanoBowl Video Contest
The American Physical Society invites students to explain physics through football as part of the Physics Central NanoBowl video contest. The winning entry will receive the NanoTrophy, the smallest trophy ever made.

Contact: James Riordon
riordon@aps.org
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

11-Dec-2007
ACS debuts 12 Days of Holiday Podcasts
The American Chemical Society Office of Communications has launched 12 Days of Holiday Podcasts, a podcast focusing on chemistry's connections to the holiday season.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

6-Dec-2007
Hinode mission delves into the Sun's mysteries
New results from the Hinode space mission should help explain some long-standing mysteries of the Sun. ("Hinode" is Japanese for "sunrise.")

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Dec-2007
Students helping a university cut energy consumption
UC San Diego undergraduate students have designed, built and deployed a network of five weather-monitoring stations as a key step toward helping the university use ocean breezes to cool buildings and identify the sunniest rooftops for solar panels.

Contact: Rex Graham
ragraham@ucsd.edu
858-822-3075
University of California - San Diego

29-Nov-2007
In early human ancestor, growing up came late for males
If Paranthropus robustus -- a human ancestor that lived about 2 million years ago -- had gone to school dances, it would have been pretty awkward. New research shows that the males of this species matured much later in life than females.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Nov-2007
'Dragon's blood' slays germs
Scientists have recently found several compounds in dragon's blood that fight bacteria that cause indigestion, heartburn and nausea. This is a serious but common problem that affects about 60 million people in the United States each year.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

22-Nov-2007
A supercontinent that stayed put
For about 100 million years of Earth's history, from the Permian through the Jurassic periods, all of Earth's continents were actually joined as a single supercontinent, called Pangea ("pan-JEE-uh"). It began breaking up during the Jurassic, forming the continents Gondwanaland and Laurasia.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 911-920 out of 1275 stories.
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