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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 921-930 out of 1275 stories.
<< < 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 > >>


15-Nov-2007
'Roach-bots' guide cockroach swarms
When a handful of cockroach-like robots joined a group of real roaches, the roach-bots coaxed the whole group to behave in unusual ways, researchers report in a new study.

Contact: Scipak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Nov-2007
New world first type 1 diabetes technology
Glucoboy encourages children with type 1 diabetes to test their blood glucose levels by unlocking new characters and secret game levels available in one of five games.

Contact: Aaron Parnell
aaronp@diabetesnsw.com.au
Diabetes Australia

8-Nov-2007
Spadefoot toads break the rules in dry weather
Desert-dwelling animals have all kinds of clever tricks for surviving in their dry environments. This includes the spadefoot toad, which is named for the hard, pointy "spade" on its hind feet, which is used for digging.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Nov-2007
Calling all junior food detectives!
Kaiser Permanente just launched a first of its kind, free, interactive online video game that teaches kids to eat healthier foods, be more active and manage how much time they spend in front of the computer and television. Developed by the producer of the "SpongeBob SquarePants," "Monsters, Inc." and "Rugrats" video games, "The Incredible Adventures of the Amazing Food Detective" targets children ages 9-10 and is available in both English and Spanish.

Contact: Danielle Cass
Danielle.x.cass@kp.org
510-267-5364
Kaiser Permanente

1-Nov-2007
American Chemical Society debuts Bytesize Science -- a new podcast for young listeners
The American Chemical Society Office of Communications has launched the kid and teen-friendly Bytesize Science, a science podcast that aims to entertain as much as it educates.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

1-Nov-2007
They don't fly, they aren't lemurs, but colugos are our closest relative
Researchers have determined that colugos are the closest relative to primates, according to a Science research article. Humans belong to the biological order of primates along with apes, monkeys and lemurs. Knowing who we are related to allows researchers the opportunity to study how we primates evolved from our nearest relative.

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Oct-2007
The tummy talks: why some people love chocolate
If you love chocolate, then you might blame your stomach. Scientists in Switzerland have discovered that people who crave chocolate have different stomach bacteria than those who don't like chocolate. Their study provides new insights into food cravings that may lead to healthier dietary guidelines that are customized to one's individual needs, the researchers say.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

25-Oct-2007
YouTube video 'Planet Bob' uses humor to magnify focus on biodiversity
"Planet Bob," a joint video production from Arizona State University's International Institute for Species Exploration and Media Alchemy Inc., uses live action, state-of-the-art animation, and the vocal talents of venerable TV host Hugh Downs and others, to present the mysterious, exciting -- and surprisingly funny -- side of taxonomy.

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

25-Oct-2007
Neanderthals may have been redheads
Some Neanderthals -- relatives to modern humans, who lived in Europe and Central Asia approximately 230,000 to 30,000 years ago -- may have had genetic variations that hypothetically could have produced pale skin and red hair, a European research team has found.

Contact: SciPak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Oct-2007
SolarFox hits the halfway stage
A team of staff and students from UCL (University College London) are competing in one of the world's toughest engineering tests -- the Panasonic World Solar Challenge. The biennial event sees teams build their own solar-powered cars and then race them over a gruelling 3000km course from Darwin to Adelaide.

Contact: Dave Weston
d.weston@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-767-97678
University College London

Showing stories 921-930 out of 1275 stories.
<< < 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 > >>


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