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Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 931-940 out of 1243 stories.
<< < 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 > >>

6-Jul-2007
Students, museum visitors, and Web surfers can join first search for life on the Arctic Ocean floor
A multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers is conducting the first search for life and hot springs on the seafloor of the Arctic Ocean. Through the use of the World Wide Web and satellite communications, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is bringing students and citizens along with them.

Contact: News Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

5-Jul-2007
Frozen DNA tells Greenland's past
About 1,000 years ago the infamous Norseman Erik the Red gave Greenland its name, even though 85 percent of the country is covered in ice. And now, some of that ice is providing us with information about prehistoric life on the arctic island.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Jul-2007
And the ATV competition winner is...
Two months ago, ESA asked young people from all over Europe to suggest the most suitable playlist for the astronauts living on the International Space Station. After sifting through over 1000 entries from 10 member states, the judges have announced their final decision.

Contact: Markus Bauer
markus.bauer@esa.int
31-715-656-799
European Space Agency

28-Jun-2007
Kitty's family tree
Housecats around the world can now trace their ancestry back to the Near Eastern wildcat, which today lives in the remote deserts of Israel, Saudi Arabia and other countries in the Middle East.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Jun-2007
More icebergs are adrift in the Southern Ocean
One of the effects of global warming has been an increase in icebergs breaking off from the Antarctic ice sheet. Oceanographers studying this phenomenon learned that free-drifting Antarctic icebergs can make important positive contributions to the carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean that is so important to a balanced planet, according to a new report.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jun-2007
Academy marks 10th anniversary of summer science college internship program
Summer for some college students means waitressing at the beach or caddying at the local golf course. But for eight lucky undergraduate students at the Academy of Natural Sciences this summer, it means examining the guts of fish for PCBs, studying Devonian fossils to understand ancient life histories and developing an Internet-accessible identification guide to help homeowners identify insect pests in lawns from those that are merely a nuisance.

Contact: Carolyn Belardo
belardo@ansp.org
215-299-1043
Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

14-Jun-2007
Arctic plants, frequent flyers?
If the climate gets too warm or cold, an animal can walk, fly or swim to a more comfortable habitat. But what about a plant?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Jun-2007
Changes in logging changes life in Central Africa
Central Africa is known for its dense forests that are some of the most pristine on the planet. They are home to an amazing array of wildlife and even pygmies. But life in this remote area is changing, and not for the better.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Jun-2007
Researchers offer free solar monitors to classrooms to encourage worldwide interest in science
Stanford University researchers are giving away easy-to-use instruments that monitor the sun's impact on the earth. The goal is to encourage underprivileged students here and in developing countries to get involved in science.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

4-Jun-2007
Highland hazards
There are dangers lurking in the highlands of western Norway. Towering over beautiful fjords is a 600-meter long crack in a steep mountainside. The crack worries researchers, not least in the tourist village of Geiranger.

Contact: Knut van der Wel
kw@rcn.no
47-220-37353
The Research Council of Norway

Showing stories 931-940 out of 1243 stories.
<< < 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 > >>

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