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Kid-friendly Feature Stories


Showing stories 971-980 out of 1275 stories.
<< < 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 > >>


7-Jun-2007
Researchers offer free solar monitors to classrooms to encourage worldwide interest in science
Stanford University researchers are giving away easy-to-use instruments that monitor the sun's impact on the earth. The goal is to encourage underprivileged students here and in developing countries to get involved in science.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

4-Jun-2007
Highland hazards
There are dangers lurking in the highlands of western Norway. Towering over beautiful fjords is a 600-meter long crack in a steep mountainside. The crack worries researchers, not least in the tourist village of Geiranger.

Contact: Knut van der Wel
kw@rcn.no
47-220-37353
The Research Council of Norway

31-May-2007
International solar house competition helps students see the light
College students in 20 sites around the world are in a heated competition to develop new technology or to apply existing technology in new ways as part of an ongoing global competition to build the planet's best solar house.

Contact: M.B. Reilly
mary-bridget.reilly@uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

31-May-2007
UD students explore careers in cancer genetics
Cancer casts a shadow of fear over many families. The disease will take the lives of a half-million Americans this year, according to the American Cancer Society. Students at the University of Delaware are preparing for careers in cancer genetics through unique internships at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center in Newark, Del., as well as hands-on laboratory research at UD.

Contact: Tracey Bryant
tbryant@udel.edu
302-831-8185
University of Delaware

31-May-2007
Walking lessons from orangutans
In the typical picture of human evolution, a gorilla- or chimp-like ape, dragging its knuckles on the ground, gradually straightens up and turns into a modern human standing on two legs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-May-2007
The amazing baby brain
If you were watching television with the sound turned off, do you think you could tell what language the actors were speaking in? Babies can, according to new research. At least, they can tell whether a face is speaking their native language or a foreign language.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-May-2007
Paradise for fossil hunters
Svalbard, also known as Spitsbergen, is a paradise for fossil hunters. Numerous footprints and tracks have been discovered in recent years. Last autumn, scientists found the first complete skeleton of one of the largest carnivores ever to walk the earth!

Contact: Knut van der Wel
kw@rcn.no
47-220-37353
The Research Council of Norway

17-May-2007
You won't hear this Nemo on American Idol
While the animated fish Nemo talks, real clownfish aren't ready to appear on the television show American Idol. The real Nemos -- clownfish -- only make "chirps" and "pops." Upon hearing it, Simon would say "that's ghastly."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-May-2007
Bat flight secrets revealed
Scientists have discovered how bats' wing motions help them stay in the air. The research shows that bats and birds use their wings quite differently.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-May-2007
Mercury's core issues
The inside of the tiny planet Mercury has long been a mystery, but scientists have now begun to solve it. A new study shows that the Mercury's core is at least partially liquid, or "molten," just like Earth's core is.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 971-980 out of 1275 stories.
<< < 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 > >>


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