EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
17-Apr-2014 06:47
Eastern US Time
Kid-
Friendly Feature Stories
News for and About Kids
Games for Kids
Science Reporting for Kids E-mail List
Links and Resources
About the Science Reporting for Kids Portal
DOE Resources
for Kids
NIH Resources
for Kids

Science Reporting for Kids RSS feed RSS
Funding

Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

Kid-friendly Feature Stories

Showing stories 981-990 out of 1204 stories.
<< < 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 > >>

13-Jul-2006
School's in for meerkats
OK, we know that it's the middle of summer and you don't want to think about school yet. But just think of how exciting school would be if one of your classes were all about catching scorpions! That's one of the things young meerkats learn from their teachers, say Alex Thornton and Katherine McAuliffe of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Jul-2006
Were mammoths blondes and brunettes?
In most illustrations of ice-age animals, the huge, shaggy mammoths are just plain brown. But if you are doing your own illustration and want to mix things up a little, science may be on your side. Researchers have made a discovery that makes them think mammoths might have come in both light and dark colors.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Jun-2006
What's new in green chemistry?
The American Chemical Society News Service has launched a weblog (http://acsnewsservice.typepad.com/) which will begin with coverage of the 10th annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference June 26-30.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

29-Jun-2006
Teenagerhood, age of opportunity
Many decades ago, the word "teenager" didn't exist. Growing up pretty much meant that you went from being a child to an adult. But, around the 1950s, people began thinking of teenagerhood as its own stage of life, midway between being a kid and a grownup.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Jun-2006
Sticky spider web caught bugs millions of years ago
Have you ever touched a spider's web? If you have, you know they are sticky but also pretty easy to break. It's hard to believe a spider's web could last for millions of years, but one web did. Scientists from Spain and the United States say they found a 110-million spider web that still has bug parts sticking to it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Jun-2006
Watch NASA plot hurricanes through the season
NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS), housed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. has created a new webpage to help amateur hurricane-trackers see when each storm happened during the season and how strong it was.

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.J.Gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

20-Jun-2006
Satellites show blind people the way
For blind people, finding their way around a city and arriving safely at their destination is far from easy. However, a new system based on data from navigation satellites may soon offer help for the visually impaired. Recent trials in Madrid have shown the value of the portable device for giving directions to the blind.

Contact: Karina De Castris
karina.de.castris@esa.int
39-069-418-0844
European Space Agency

20-Jun-2006
Fresh frozen people?
A new scientific study suggests that many years in the future, it may be possible to freeze people who have incurable diseases and unthaw them when cures are available.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

20-Jun-2006
Bacteria can protect metal
Bacteria, also known as germs, have a bad reputation. They can spoil milk and can cause diseases. But University of Southern California researcher Florian Mansfield has found that one kind of bacteria has a remarkable and potentially very useful power: it can protect metal from corrosion.

Contact: Eric Mankin
mankin@usc.edu
213-821-1887
University of Southern California

15-Jun-2006
Digging up the super great-granddaddy of ducks
There were lots of dinosaurs in China 110 million years ago, but did you know that there were also lots of birds? Some of these birds looked like feathered dinosaurs, but some of them looked a lot like birds we see flying around today. This week, scientists from China and the United States will show the world some very old fossils of a bird called Gansus that might have been the super-great-granddaddy of ducks.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 981-990 out of 1204 stories.
<< < 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 > >>

GAMES FOR KIDS!


Play now >>