Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-10 out of 495.

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Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
NASA shows upper-level westerly winds affecting Tropical Storm Fred
Upper-level westerly winds have been affecting Tropical Storm Fred in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean and continue to do so today, September 3. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the highest thunderstorms pushed southeast of the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Typhoon Kilo headed west
Typhoon Kilo is the westernmost tropical cyclone of a four storms in the Pacific Ocean basin on September 4. From west to east they include Typhoon Kilo, Hurricane Ignacio, Hurricane Jimena and Tropical Storm Kevin.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Ignacio in a trio across the Pacific
The tropical trio of tropical cyclones continued on September 3 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Pacific Ocean. Images taken from several overpasses were put together to create a panorama of the Pacific that included Typhoon Kilo, Hurricane Ignacio and Hurricane Jimena.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM sees Hurricane Jimena's eroding eyewall
Hurricane Jimena, a once powerful Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds estimated at 140 mph by the National Hurricane Center, has continued to weaken well east of Hawaii. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall rates and saw the eyewall was eroding.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Geological Society of America Bulletin
California rising
Spatially corrected sea-level records for the Pacific coast indicate that uplift rates are overestimated by 40 percent.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Geology
Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought, say Stanford scientists
Stanford study suggests that today's ice sheets may be more resilient to increased carbon dioxide levels than previously thought.

Contact: Miles Traer
mtraer@stanford.edu
650-497-9541
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees winds increase in Tropical Storm Kevin
NASA's RapidScat instrument observed tropical storm-force winds in the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Depression 14E or TD14E that helped forecasters see it was strengthening.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
PLOS ONE
Historical data hold secrets of 1 of UK's favorite fish
UK fisheries survey logbooks from the 1930s to 1950s have been digitized for the first time, revealing how cod responded to changing temperatures in the last century.

Contact: Press Office
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
01-392-722-062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Potential of disk-shaped small structures, coccoliths
Researchers at Hiroshima University and the University of Tsukuba showed that coccolith disks made of calcium carbonate in Emiliania huxleyi, one of the promising biomass resources, potentially perform roles in reducing and enhancing the light that enters the cell by light scattering. Elucidation of the physiological significance of coccolith formation in E. huxleyi can help promote efficient bio-energy production using microalgae.
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST/PRESTO, "Creation of Basic Technology for improved Bioenergy Production through Functional Analysis and Regulation of Algae and Other Aquatic Microorganisms."

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
New robot has crown-of-thorns starfish in its sights
QUT roboticists have developed the world's first robot designed to seek out and control the Great Barrier Reef's crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), which are responsible for an estimated 40 per cent of the reef's total decline in coral cover.

Contact: Kate Haggman
kate.haggman@qut.edu.au
61-731-380-358
Queensland University of Technology

Showing releases 1-10 out of 495.

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