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Blub blub blub Established by the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography, the Discovery of Sound in the Sea project provides an extensive catalogue of animal and human acoustics in the world's oceans. Check out their audio gallery here!
Crabs Dolphin Fish Fish Seal Shark Squid Research Submarine Vent Seal and Orca

Video: San Diego State University scientists brought a DNA sequencer out into the field to do remote sequencing in real time, saving time compared to work traditionally done at laboratories many miles away from research sites. See the video here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruña, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-10 out of 370.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Coral growth rate plummets in 30-year comparison
A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia's Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be playing an important role in this perilous slowdown.
Moore Foundation

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi weakening over Vietnam
Tropical Storm Kalmaegi made landfall on Sept. 17 near the border of Vietnam and China and moved inland. Soon after the landfall as a typhoon, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the weaker tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Biological Conservation
Cape Cod saltmarsh recovery looks good, falls short
In some places Cape Cod's imperiled saltmarsh grasses have been making a comeback, but a new study reports that their ability to protect the coast has not returned nearly as fast as their healthy appearance would suggest.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Coral Reefs
Study finds Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber
New research has found that the Great Barrier Reef, as a whole, is a remarkably effective wave absorber, despite large gaps between the reefs. This means that landward of the reefs, waves are mostly related to local winds rather than offshore wave conditions.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Expedition finds Nemo can travel great distances to connect populations
Clownfish spend their entire lives nestling in the protective tentacles of host anemones, but new research shows that as babies they sometimes travel hundreds of kilometres across the open ocean. Although the process of long-distance dispersal by reef fish has been predicted, this is the first time that the high level exchange of offspring between distant populations has been observed.

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
What set the Earth's plates in motion?
Professor Patrice Rey, from the University of Sydney's School of Geoscience, and his colleagues have a new explanation for the origin of plate tectonics.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-042-529-6802
University of Sydney

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Nemo's epic journey to find a new home
New research has found clownfish larvae can swim up to 400 kilometres in search of a home, which makes them better able to cope with environmental change. It's the furthest distance they've been able to track the dispersal of any coral reef fish and the findings show how connected the marine environment can be.
Natural Environment Research Council, Royal Society, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Études, Davis Trust, University of Edinburgh Development Trust, Carnegie Trust, BS-AC Jubilee Trust, Weir Trust

Contact: Hugo Harrison
hugo.harrison@my.jcu.edu.au
61-049-952-3939
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Counting fish teeth reveals regulatory DNA changes behind rapid evolution, adaptation
Threespine sticklebacks, small fish found around the globe, undergo rapid evolutionary change when they move from the ocean to freshwater lakes, losing their armor and gaining more teeth in as little as 10 years. UC Berkeley biologist Craig Miller shows that this rapid change results not from mutations in functional genes, but changes in regulatory DNA. He pinpoints a gene that could be responsible for teeth, bone or jaw deformities in humans, including cleft palate.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
eLife
New research decodes virus-host interactions in ocean dead zones
A new study reveals the interactions among bacteria and viruses that prey on them thriving in oxygen minimum zones -- stretches of ocean starved for oxygen that occur around the globe. Understanding such microbial communities in their natural environments is an important step in understanding global processes, including climate.
DOE/Joint Genome Institute, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, G. Unger Vetlesen and Ambrose Monell Foundations, Tula Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Polo gives a NASA satellite a 'cold reception'
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite uses infrared light to read cloud top temperatures in tropical cyclones. When Aqua passed over newborn Tropical Storm Polo off of Mexico's southwestern coast it got a 'cold reception' when infrared data saw some very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms within that hint at intensification.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1-10 out of 370.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


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