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New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 1-10 out of 436.

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Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Researchers provide new details about sea stars' immunity
A study led by a University of Texas at Arlington graduate student examining sea stars dying along the West Coast provides new clues about the starfish's immune response and its ability to protect a diverse coastal ecosystem.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
GSA Today
Past and present sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA
In a new article for GSA Today, authors Benjamin DeJong and colleagues write that sea-level rise (3.4 mm/yr) is faster in the Chesapeake Bay region than any other location on the Atlantic coast of North America, and twice the global average (1.7 mm/yr). They have found that dated interglacial deposits suggest that relative sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay region deviate from global trends over a range of timescales.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Endangered icebreakers: The future of Arctic research, exploration and rescue at risk
The United States' Icebreaker Fleet -- operated by the US Coast Guard -- consists of just two ships that are used for everything from search and rescue to national security operations to scientific research. Examine the various roles icebreakers play, especially in Arctic research, and how insufficient funding is affecting the icebreakers' roles.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@agiweb.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Marine Policy
Humpback whale recovery in Australia -- A cause for celebration
Australia has one of the highest rates of animal species that face extinction in the world. However, over the last decade, there have been animals that are rebounding. One example is the conservation success story of the recovery of the humpback whales that breed in Australian waters. This new study, published in Marine Policy, reviews data collected in past studies and proposes a revision of the conservation status for humpback whales found in Australian waters.

Contact: Alex Walker
a.walker@elsevier.com
44-186-584-3364
Elsevier

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
FAU to develop unmanned marine vehicles for bridge inspections
Florida has approximately 11,450 bridges and inspecting and maintaining them is arduous, especially since so many of them span rivers, canals and saltwater areas. Researchers at FAU have received a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation to develop unmanned marine vehicles for on-water bridge inspections. Unlike manned vessels, which are continuously teleoperated by a human user, unmanned surface vehicles are capable of operating autonomously without human intervention for prolonged periods of time.
Florida Department of Transportation

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Plant light sensors came from ancient algae
The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study from Duke University. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Ecology
Scientists study predator-prey behavior between sharks and turtles
A new collaborative study led by scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science & Abess Center for Ecosystem Science & Policy examined predator-prey interactions between tiger sharks and sea turtles off the Northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4061
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
New research using NASA satellite data and ocean biology models suggests tiny organisms in vast stretches of the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead. Brighter clouds reflect more sunlight back into space affecting the amount of solar energy that reaches Earth's surface, which in turn has implications for global climate. The results were published July 17 in the journal Science Advances.
NASA

Contact: Ellen Gray
Ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Ecology
Parasitic flatworms flout global biodiversity patterns
The odds of being attacked and castrated by a variety of parasitic flatworms increases for marine horn snails the farther they are found from the tropics. A Smithsonian-led research team discovered this exception to an otherwise globally observed pattern -- usually biodiversity is greatest in the tropics and decreases toward the poles.
Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Smithsonian Marine Science Network, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows to OM), NSF-NIH Ecology of Infectious Diseases grant

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 12W grow into a Tropical Storm
The storm intensified into a tropical storm as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead at 03:00 UTC (July 22 at 11 p.m. EDT).
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1-10 out of 436.

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