Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-10 out of 478.

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Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
14th Deep Sea Biology Symposium
Understanding the deep sea is key to a sustainable blue economy
Once considered remote and inaccessible, commercial interest to exploit the deep sea is rising due to economic drivers and technology developments. However, exploitation activities in the deep sea remain highly contentious, particularly regarding the potential risks and environmental impacts associated with such activities. Deep-sea stakeholders have identified deficiencies in basic knowledge of deep-sea systems which could hinder ecosystem-based management of the deep sea and in turn limit the sustainability of the emerging deep blue economy.

Contact: Dr. Kate Larkin
klarkin@esf.org
32-059-340-156
European Science Foundation

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Habitat International
CU Denver study shows smaller cities in developing world often unprepared for disaster
While many planners focus on the threat of natural disasters to major metropolises around the world, a new study from the University of Colorado Denver shows smaller cities are often even less equipped to handle such catastrophes.

Contact: David Kelly
david.kelly@ucdenver.edu
303-503-7990
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
PeerJ
Fossil specimen reveals a new species of ancient river dolphin to Smithsonian scientists
The careful examination of fossil fragments from Panama has led Smithsonian scientists and colleagues to the discovery of a new genus and species of river dolphin that has been long extinct. The team named it Isthminia panamensis. The specimen not only revealed a new species to science, but also shed new light onto the evolution of today's freshwater river dolphin species. The team's research was published Sept. 1 in the scientific journal PeerJ.

Contact: John Gibbons
gibbonsjp@si.edu
202-633-5187
Smithsonian

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seabird SOS
A new study inspired by a working group at NCEAS estimates that almost all seabirds have eaten plastic.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
NASA sees Hurricane Kilo headed for International Date Line
NASA's Aqua and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw Hurricane Kilo moving west in the Central Pacific Ocean as it neared the International Date Line.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
NASA sees Hurricane Jimena's large eye
NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellites provided views of Hurricane Jimena that showed it maintained a large eye and powerful thunderstorms around it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
NASA sees a weakening Hurricane Ignacio moving parallel to Hawaiian Islands
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Ignacio and viewed the storm in infrared light, providing valuable temperature data. Aqua saw a weaker Ignacio moving parallel to the Hawaiian Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
NASA finds 'hot towers' in Fred, now a hurricane
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite passed over Fred when it was developing in the Eastern Atlantic early Aug. 30 and saw 'hot towers' in the storm, which hinted that the storm was intensifying.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Zootaxa
Scientists describe new clam species from depths off Canada's Atlantic coast
A new species of giant file clam from Atlantic Canadian waters has been described by Canadian scientists. The 'cryptic' clam, which lives in deepwater canyons, was first found off the coast of Newfoundland 30 years ago, but was thought to be the known European species. More recent collections off the coast of Nova Scotia, and subsequent DNA analysis coupled with detailed morphological studies established its identity as a distinct species -- Acesta cryptadelphe.

Contact: Dan Smythe
dsmythe@mus-nature.ca
613-566-4781
Canadian Museum of Nature

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evidence of ancient life discovered in mantle rocks deep below the seafloor
Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Virginia Tech, and University of Bremen. This first-time evidence was contained in drilled rock samples of Earth's mantle -- thrust by tectonic forces to the seafloor during the Early Cretaceous period. The discovery confirms a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: WHOI Media Relations
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Showing releases 1-10 out of 478.

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