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Showing releases 1-10 out of 354.

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Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Freshwater Biology
Alaska fish adjust to climate change by following the food
Not all species may suffer from climate change. A new analysis shows that Dolly Varden, a species of char common in southeast Alaska, adjust their migrations so they can keep feasting on a key food source -- salmon eggs -- even as shifts in climate altered the timing of salmon spawning.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Nature Climate Change
New challenges for ocean acidification research
To continue its striking development, ocean acidification research needs to bridge between its diverging branches towards an integrated assessment. This is the conclusion drawn by Professor Ulf Riebesell from the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Dr. Jean-Pierre Gattuso from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie. In a commentary in the journal Nature Climate Change, the two internationally renowned experts reflect on the lessons learned from ocean acidification research and highlight future challenges.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
0049-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans
Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Collaborative Research Centre 754 'Climate - Biogeochemical Interactions in the Tropical Ocean' have found an explanation with the help of model simulations: A natural fluctuation of the trade winds. The study has been published in the international journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Collaborative Research Centre

Contact: Olaf Duteil
oduteil@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Annals of Botany
A vegetarian carnivorous plant
Carnivorous plants catch and digest tiny animals in order and derive benefits for their nutrition. Interestingly the trend towards vegetarianism seems to overcome carnivorous plants as well. The aquatic carnivorous bladderwort, which can be found in many lakes and ponds worldwide, does not only gain profit from eating little animals but also by consuming algae and pollen grains.

Contact: Alun Salt
ANNALSBOTANY@le.ac.uk
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Earth's Future
NOAA establishes 'tipping points' for sea level rise related flooding
By 2050, a majority of US coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study, published today in the American Geophysical Union's online peer-reviewed journal Earth's Future.
NOAA

Contact: Keeley Belva
Keeley.Belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
550-million-year-old fossils provide new clues about fossil formation
A new study from University of Missouri and Virginia Tech researchers is challenging accepted ideas about how ancient soft-bodied organisms become part of the fossil record. Findings suggest that bacteria involved in the decay of those organisms play an active role in how fossils are formed -- often in a matter of just a few tens to hundreds of years. Understanding the relationship between decay and fossilization will inform future study and help researchers interpret fossils in a new way.
NASA Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program, NASA Astrobiology Institute, National Science Foundation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Policy action urgently needed to protect Hawaii's dolphins
Tourism is increasing pressure on Hawaii's spinner dolphins. A new Duke-led study shows that long-proposed federal regulations to limit daytime access to bays where the dolphins rest are greatly needed, but local, community-based conservation measures tailored to each individual bay will speed their acceptance. A one-size-fits-all approach will not work.
NOAA, Marine Mammal Commission, State of Hawaii, Dolphin Quest

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Colorado River Delta greener after engineered pulse of water
The engineered spring flood that brought water to previously dry reaches of the lower Colorado River and its delta resulted in greener vegetation, the germination of new vegetation along the river and a temporary rise in the water table, according to new results from the binational team of scientists studying the water's effects. The team's latest findings will be presented at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting the afternoon of Dec. 18.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
National model of restoration: Nine Mile Run
A study by a Pitt hydrologist shows that one of the largest urban-stream restorations in the United States has led to the recovery of fish and, more importantly, a groundswell of local support.

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Australia's coastal observation network may aid in understanding of extreme ocean events
A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Showing releases 1-10 out of 354.

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