Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 1-10 out of 386.

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Public Release: 29-Apr-2016
Science Advances
Forming fogbows: Study finds limit on evaporation to ice sheets, but that may change
Although the coastal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet are experiencing rapid melting, a significant portion of the interior of that ice sheet has remained stable -- but a new study suggests that stability may not continue. Researchers found that very little of the snow and ice on the vast interior of the ice sheet is lost to the atmosphere through evaporation because of a strong thermal 'lid' that essentially traps the moisture and returns it to the surface where it refreezes.

Contact: David Noone
dcn@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-3629
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Evidence points to widespread loss of ocean oxygen by 2030s
Climate change has caused a drop in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans in some parts of the world, and those effects should become evident across large parts of the ocean between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study led by researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Entomological Society of America releases statement on the dangers of invasive species
The Entomological Society of America has issued a statement about the dangers of invasive species and the potential threats they pose to US national interests by undermining food security, trade agreements, forest health, ecosystem services, environmental quality, and public health and recreation.

Contact: Chris Stelzig
cstelzig@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Annals of Glaciology
Ice loss accelerating in Greenland's coastal glaciers, Dartmouth study finds
Surface meltwater draining through and underneath Greenland's tidewater glaciers is accelerating their loss of ice mass, according to a Dartmouth study that sheds light on the relationship between meltwater and subglacial discharge.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Canadian waters getting safer, but research gaps limit full understanding of shipping risks
The workshop report, 'Commercial Marine Shipping Accidents: Understanding the Risks in Canada,' identifies the risks of commercial marine shipping accidents across Canada's regions and for different cargo types, while highlighting gaps in understanding and areas for further research.

Contact: Samantha Rae Ayoub
samantha.rae@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x256
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
Hear no evil: Farmed fish found to be hard of hearing
New research published today in the journal Scientific Reports has revealed for the first time that half of the world's farmed fish have hearing loss due to a deformity of the earbone.

Contact: Nerissa Hannink
nhannink@unimelb.edu.au
61-430-588-055
University of Melbourne

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Journal of Comparative Neurology
Scientists establish first map of the sea lion brain
Despite considerable evidence for the California sea lion's intelligence, very little is known about how their brain is organized. Now, a team of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University has taken an important step toward uncovering this mystery by conducting the first comprehensive study of the California sea lion's central nervous system, concentrating on the somatosensory system, which is concerned with conscious perception of touch, pressure, pain, temperature, position and vibration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Protecting diversity on coral reefs: DNA may hold the key
Research published today by a team of scientists discovered that large areas of intact coral reef with extensive live coral cover, not disturbed by humans or climate change, harbor the greatest amount of genetic diversity. With this work, the researchers uncovered a link between species diversity of an ecosystem and the genetic diversity encoded within the DNA of those species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Deep-sea biodiversity impacted by climate change's triple threat
A new study found that vulnerability of deep-sea biodiversity to climate change's triple threat -- rising water temperatures, and decreased oxygen, and pH levels -- is not uniform across the world's oceans.

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
New book by ecologist James Estes recounts pioneering research in Alaska
In his new book, 'Serendipity,' marine ecologist James Estes recounts the simple twists of fate that sent him to the Aleutian Islands in 1970 to study the distribution and abundance of sea otters. It was the start of a remarkable journey of discovery that led to profound insights about the complexity of ecological interactions and the importance of predators in natural ecosystems.

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Showing releases 1-10 out of 386.

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