Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Public Release: 26-May-2015
Protecting South America's iconic golden dorado fish
A new study launched this month by University of Massachusetts Amherst fisheries biologist Andy J. Danylchuk, in collaboration with Argentina's Ministry of Environment and regional partners including Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio, Fish Simply, and Patagonia Inc., is the first to assess the impact of catch-and-release fishing and other human and environmental pressures on the golden dorado, a fish of high economic and recreational value across South America.
Patagonia, Inc., Argentina's Ministry of Environment, Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio and Fish Simply

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Wrasse project offers production boost to Scottish salmon industry
Aquaculture experts from the University of Stirling, Scotland, are leading the research behind a £4 million project to boost production in the Scottish salmon farming industry. Scientists from the University's internationally acclaimed Institute of Aquaculture have helped to develop the potential of wrasse, a cleaner fish which supports the efficient production of salmon. Stirling researchers are using wrasse as part of a sustainable, integrated pest management strategy.
Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, Marine Harvest, Scottish Sea Farms, BioMar, University of Stirling

Contact: David Christie
david.christie1@stir.ac.uk
01-786-466-653
University of Stirling

Public Release: 26-May-2015
UN Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board
Top challenges for the future of humanity and the planet
Leading global experts serving on the UN Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board have identified key scientific challenges that must be addressed to ensure the sustainability of humanity on Earth.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-878-8712
UNESCO and Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Climate engineering may save coral reefs, study shows
Geoengineering of the climate may be the only way to save coral reefs from mass bleaching, according to new research.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Duncan Sandes
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Ecology Letters
An evolutionary heads-up
Animals with large brains are considered to be more intelligent and more successful than those with smaller brains. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna and Stockholm University have provided the first experimental evidence that large brains provide an evolutionary advantage. Large-brained female fish have a higher survival rate than those with small brains when faced with a predator, although brain size surprisingly did not influence male survival. The results were published in Ecology Letters.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
susanna.kautschitsch@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 22-May-2015
The Biological Bulletin
Estuaries protect Dungeness crabs from deadly parasites
Parasitic worms can pose a serious threat to the Dungeness crab, a commercially important fishery species found along the west coast of North America. The worms are thought to have caused or contributed to the crash of the crab fishery of central California during the last half century. New research shows that infected crabs can rid themselves of parasites by moving into the less salty water of estuaries. Low salinity kills the worms creating a parasite refuge for the crabs.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 21-May-2015
ICES Journal of Marine Science
New model predicts fish population response to dams, other ecological factors
Researchers have developed a model to assess how dams affect the viability of sea-run fish species that need to pass dams as they use both fresh and marine waters during their lifetimes. NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office have partnered on this project to test how varying passage efficiency at dams related to survival rates for these species, using a model of endangered Atlantic salmon as a case study.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 21-May-2015
For pollock surveys in Alaska, things are looking up
Scientists from NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center have turned their view of the nation's largest fishery upside down with upward-facing sonar systems that are mounted to the seafloor and monitor the passage of fish above. They just completed their first experimental deployment of the new system, and the data, though upside down, looked great. In the future, these systems might augment traditional, ship-based acoustic surveys.

Contact: Marjorie Mooney-Seuss
marjorie.mooney-seus@noaa.gov
206-526-4348
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 21-May-2015
CloudSat analyzed the eye of Typhoon Dolphin
When Dolphin was a typhoon on May 16, NASA's CloudSat satellite completed a stunning eye overpass of Typhoon Dolphin in the West Pacific at 0412 UTC (12:12 a.m. EDT). By May 22, Dolphin's remnants were moving through the Northern Pacific.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science
Planktonic world: The new frontier
On May 22, in a special issue of Science, an international, team of scientists maps the biodiversity of a wide range of planktonic organisms, exploring their interactions - mainly parasitic, and how they impact and are affected by their environment, primarily the temperature. Based on a portion of the 35000 samples collected from all the world's oceans during the 2009-2013 expedition on board the schooner TARA, this data provides the scientific community with unprecedented resources.

Contact: Isabelle Kling
isabelle.kling@embl.de
49-622-138-78355
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Showing releases 1-10 out of 377.

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