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Blub blub blub Marine protected areas are a crucial part of preserving biodiversity. Track and analyze them by country and location with MPAtlas. This resource is provided by the Marine Conservation Institute.
Crabs Dolphin Fish Fish Seal Shark Squid Research Submarine Vent Seal and Orca

Video: A juvenile whale shark cruises over the shallow reef shelf of the South Ari Marine Protected Area. At 42km2 S.A.MPA is the largest Marine Protected Area in the Maldives and one of the few places in the world where whale sharks can be encountered all year round. See the video, from The Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruņa, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 11-20 out of 352.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate
Humans are increasingly dependent on algae, too, to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death dynamics of the algae's blooms, even when all else stays essentially the same, and this has important implications for our climate.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover
Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
Salmon forced to 'sprint' less likely to survive migration
Sockeye salmon that sprint to spawning grounds through fast-moving waters may be at risk, suggests new research by University of British Columbia scientists.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Satellite eyes a big influence on Tropical Storm Karina
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that Tropical Storm Karina's next move is based on its interaction with Tropical Storm Lowell.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Lowell's tough south side
The south side of Tropical Storm Lowell appears to be its toughest side. That is, the side with the strongest thunderstorms, according to satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-14 and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
Seals introduced tuberculosis to the New World
Seals carried tuberculosis from Africa to the Peruvian coast a new nature shows. Scientists analyzed 1,000 years old skeletons from Peru and discovered M. pinnipedii, a relative of the TB-bacterium, which affects seals today. They assume that the exploitation of seals as a dietary staple facilitated the transmission from animals to humans. These results could have an impact on the future search for a vaccine against tuberculosis. The study is published in nature.

Contact: Christian Heuss
christian.heuss@unibas.ch
41-612-848-683
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life
The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals. Their study appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
The Cryosphere
Record decline of ice sheets
Researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute have for the first time extensively mapped Greenland's and Antarctica's ice sheets with the help of the ESA satellite CryoSat-2 and have thus been able to prove that the ice crusts of both regions momentarily decline at an unprecedented rate. In total the ice sheets are losing around 500 cubic kilometers of ice per year. The maps and results of this study are published today in The Cryosphere.
German Ministry of Economics and Technology

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
University of Tennessee research uncovers subglacial life beneath Antarctic ice sheet
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, research finds life can persist in a cold, dark world. A University of Tennessee microbiology assistant professor was part of a team that examined waters and sediments from a shallow lake deep beneath the Antarctic ice sheet and found the extreme environment supports microbial ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
US expedition yields first breakthrough paper about life under Antarctic ice
The first breakthrough paper to come out of a massive US expedition to one of Earth's final frontiers has been published in the scientific journal, Nature.

Contact: Evelyn Boswell
evelynb@montana.edu
406-994-5135
Montana State University

Showing releases 11-20 out of 352.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


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