Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 11-20 out of 381.

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Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Nature
Plankton network linked to ocean's biological carbon pump revealed
The ocean is the largest carbon sink on the planet. The community of planktonic organisms involved in the removal of carbon from the upper layers of the ocean has now been described by oceanographers, biologists and computer scientists, from CNRS, UPMC, Nantes University, VIB, EMBL and CEA. This first overview of the network of species linked to the oceanic biological pump revealed new players as well as the main bacterial functions participating in the process.

Contact: Sooike Stoops
sooike.stoops@vib.be
32-474-289-252
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
ZooKeys
Two new zoantharian species found on eunicid worms in the dark in the Indo-Pacific ocean
While researching the understudied fauna of the genus Epizoanthus in the Indo-Pacific Ocean, Japanese scientists focused on examining species living with eunicid worms, where they form a colony on the outside of the worm's tube. Although these zoantharians often live in areas that are tough to reach, and despite the species tending to be indistinguishable on the outside, the present research, published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, reports the discovery of two new species.

Contact: Hiroki Kise
hkm11sea@yahoo.co.jp
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Fish fins can sense touch
The human fingertip is a finely tuned sensory machine, and even slight touches convey a great deal of information about our physical environment. It turns out, some fish use their pectoral fins in pretty much the same way. And do so through a surprisingly similar biological mechanism to mammals -- humans included.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
NASA sees development of Tropical Storm 11P in Southwestern Pacific
The tropical low pressure area previously known as System 97P has developed into a tropical storm named 11P in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
NASA sees Tropical Storm 10S form
Tropical Storm 10S developed as NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean. The tropical storm developed from tropical low pressure area 96S between Madagascar and La Reunion Island.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Genetics help fish thrive in toxic environments, collaborative study finds
A 10-year collaborative project led by biologists from Kansas State University and Washington State University has discovered how the Atlantic molly is able to live in toxic hydrogen sulfide water.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Tobler
tobler@k-state.edu
785-532-6652
Kansas State University

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
Nature
Plankton carries carbon to safe resting spot, ocean study reveals
The ocean's power to rein in carbon and protect the environment is vast but not well-understood. But now, an international team of scientists has begun to illuminate how the ocean plucks carbon from the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming, and shuttles it to the bottom of the sea.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Matthew Sullivan
mbsulli@gmail.com
614-247-1616
Ohio State University

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
NASA data reveals tropical cyclone forming near Madagascar
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite and NASA's RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station have provided forecasters with data that shows System 96S, a tropical low pressure area in the Southern Indian Ocean, is consolidating and developing into a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Open Biology
Starfish reveal the origins of brain messenger molecules
Biologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered the genes in starfish that encode neuropeptides -- a common type of chemical found in human brains. The revelation gives researchers new insights into how neural function evolved in the animal kingdom.
The Leverhulme Trust, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Neha Okhandiar
n.okhandiar@qmul.ac.uk
020-788-27927
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
eLife
Slime can see
After 340 years of looking at bacteria under a microscope, scientists discover that bacteria themselves can see, helping them move towards light for photosynthesis.

Contact: Zoe Dunford
z.dunford@elifesciences.org
44-077-863-03597
eLife

Showing releases 11-20 out of 381.

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