Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 11-20 out of 383.

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Public Release: 3-May-2016
171st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Megan S. Ballard awarded the R. Bruce Lindsay Award of the Acoustical Society of America
Megan S. Ballard of the Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, has been named recipient of the R. Bruce Lindsay Award of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) for contributions to underwater acoustic propagation modeling and inversion techniques in acoustical oceanography.

Contact: Elaine Moran
elaine@aip.org
516-576-2360
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 3-May-2016
171st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Whitlow Au awarded Gold Medal by Acoustical Society of America
Whitlow W. L. Au, Emeritus Research Professor at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kaneohe, HI, has been named recipient of the Gold Medal of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) for contributions to understanding underwater biosonar, and for service to the Acoustical Society.

Contact: Elaine Moran
elaine@aip.org
516-576-2360
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 3-May-2016
eLife
The herring genome provides new insight on how species adapt to their environment
How species genetically adapt to their environment is a central question related to the evolution of biodiversity. In a new study scientists at Uppsala University and their colleagues report that whole genome sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring revealed hundreds of loci underlying adaptation to the brackish Baltic Sea or timing of reproduction. The study is published today in eLife.

Contact: Professor Leif Andersson
Leif.Andersson@imbim.uu.se
46-705-144-904
Uppsala University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Science Advances
Reef system with 10,000 km2 found at the Amazon River mouth
Researchers from Brazil and the US mapped and characterized an extensive reef system in an unlikely area of the Brazilian coast. Oil and gas companies operate close to the reefs.
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil), Coordenadoria de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - CAPES (Brazil), Fundação Carlos Chagas Filho de Amparo à Pesqui

Contact: USP Scientific Outreach Unit
divulgacaocientifica@usp.br
55-113-091-3242
University of Sao Paulo Scientific Outreach Unit

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Bioscience
River food webs threatened by widespread hydropower practice
The decline of aquatic insects downstream from some hydroelectric dams has been linked to a widespread practice known as hydropeaking, whereby river flows are increased during the day when electricity demands are large, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey, along with researchers from Oregon State University, Utah State University and Idaho State University. Findings show it may be possible to mitigate these negative effects by using alternative hydropower practices.
US Geological Survey, Oregon State University, Utah State University, Idaho State University

Contact: Jennifer LaVista
jlavista@usgs.gov
720-480-7875
US Geological Survey

Public Release: 2-May-2016
BioScience
Hydropeaking of river water levels is disrupting insect survival, river ecosystems
A group of researchers concluded today in a study in the journal BioScience that 'hydropeaking' of water flows on many rivers in the West has a devastating impact on aquatic insect abundance.
Bureau of Reclamation's Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, US Geological Survey's Southwest Biological Science Center, Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration.

Contact: David Lytle
lytleda@oregonstate.edu
Oregon State University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
New study found ocean acidification may be impacting coral reefs in the Florida keys
MIAMI -- In a new study, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers found that the limestone that forms the foundation of coral reefs along the Florida Reef Tract is dissolving during the fall and winter months on many reefs in the Florida Keys. The research showed that the upper Florida Keys were the most impacted by the annual loss of reef.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 2-May-2016
BioScience
Hydropeaking extirpates river insects
One of hydropower's purported benefits is its ability to use timed water releases to meet peak electrical demand. However, this practice can eliminate populations of insects that lay eggs near the river's edge, with potentially severe effects for ecosystems.

Contact: James M Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-May-2016
EARTH: Reading the ridges -- Are climate and the seafloor connected?
EARTH Magazine plunges into the depths of the ocean with scientists seeking whether Earth's climate and sea-level history are intrinsically linked with tectonics at mid-ocean ridges.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Climate Change
How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise?
Land water, including groundwater extraction, contributes far less to sea level rise than previously thought, according to a new study.

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-223-680-7316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Showing releases 11-20 out of 383.

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