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August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-110 out of 314.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice ages
Climate scientists have long tried to explain why ice-age cycles became longer and more intense some 900,000 years ago, switching from 41,000-year cycles to 100,000-year cycles.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
New report evaluates progress of comprehensive everglades restoration plan
Although planning for Everglades restoration projects has advanced considerably over the past two years, financial, procedural, and policy constraints have impeded project implementation, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council.

Contact: Lauren Rugani
news@nas.edu
202-334-2076
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Global Change Biology
Climate change and the ecology of fear
Climate change is predicted to have major impacts on the many species that call our rocky shorelines home. Indeed, species living in these intertidal habitats, which spend half their day exposed to air and the other half submerged by water, may be subjected to a double whammy as both air and water temperatures rise. Given the reliance of human society on nearshore coastal ecosystems, it is critical that we better understand how climate change will affect them.

Contact: Lori Lennon
l.lennon@neu.edu
617-680-5129
Northeastern University College of Science

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Extinct undersea volcanoes squashed under Earth's crust cause tsunami earthquakes, according to new research
New research has revealed the causes and warning signs of rare tsunami earthquakes.

Contact: Colin Smith
cd.smith@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46712
Imperial College London

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Scientific Reports
Research provides new theory on cause of ice age 2.6 million years ago
New research published today in the journal Nature Scientific Reports has provided a major new theory on the cause of the ice age that covered large parts of the Northern Hemisphere 2.6 million years ago.

Contact: Paul Teed
paul.teed@rhul.ac.uk
01-784-443-967
Royal Holloway, University of London

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Animals built reefs 550 million years ago, fossil study finds
It is a remarkable survivor of an ancient aquatic world -- now a new study sheds light on how one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed.
Natural Environment Research Council, University of Edinburgh, Laidlaw Trust

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
01-316-502-246
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pacing and intensity of ice ages
In a new study in Science, researchers find that the deep ocean currents that move heat around the globe stalled or even stopped about 950,000 years ago, possibly due to expanding ice cover in the north. The slowing currents increased carbon dioxide storage in the ocean, leaving less in the atmosphere, which kept temperatures cold and kicked the climate system into a new phase of colder but less frequent ice ages, they hypothesize.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists find the shocking truth about electric fish
Scientists have found how the electric fish evolved its jolt. Writing June 27, 2014, in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by Michael Sussman of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harold Zakon of the University of Texas at Austin and Manoj Samanta of the Systemix Institute in Redmond, Wash., identifies the regulatory molecules involved in the genetic and developmental pathways that electric fish have used to convert a simple muscle into an organ capable of generating a potent electrical field.
National Science Foundation, W. M. Keck Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Sussman
msussman@wisc.edu
608-262-8608
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Managing specialized microbes to clean stubborn chemicals from the environment
In a series of new studies, Anca Delgado, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines unique groups of microorganisms, capable of converting hazardous chlorinated chemicals like trichloroetheene into ethene, a benign end product of microbial biodegradation.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Wild Connection: What Animal Mating and Courtship Tell Us About Human Relationships
Sex-crazed turtles, confused bees, and cheating swans. These are just a few of the things animal behavior expert Dr. Jennifer Verdolin discusses in this new book that blends humor and science to show the similarities between humans and animals when it comes to dating and relationships.

Contact: Jennifer Verdolin
jverdolin@yahoo.com
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Showing releases 101-110 out of 314.

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