Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-110 out of 479.

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Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature Geoscience
CO2 emissions change with size of streams and rivers
Researchers have shown that the greenhouse gas appears in streams by way of two different sources -- either as a direct pipeline for groundwater and carbon-rich soils, or from aquatic organisms releasing the gas through respiration and natural decay.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Suomi NPP satellite sees Molave on the move
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Tropical Storm Molave as it was moving away from Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Male elephant seals use 'voice recognition' to identify rivals, study finds
Male elephant seals compete fiercely for access to females during the breeding season, and their violent, bloody fights take a toll on both winners and losers. These battles are relatively rare, however, and a new study shows that the males avoid costly fights by learning the distinctive vocal calls of their rivals. When they recognize the call of another male, they know whether to attack or flee depending on the challenger's dominance status.
US Office of Naval Research, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
NASA sees heavy rain in Hurricane Hilda, south of Hawaii
Hurricane Hilda has been on a weakening trend and by Aug. 12 it weakened to a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Natural arches, Italian earthquake, Canadian rivers & research papers
Natural arches hum their health and scientists are listening For the first time, scientists have found a way to detect if the breathtaking natural arches of Utah's Canyonlands and Arches national parks are suffering from internal damage that could lead to their collapse, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature Geoscience
Significant breath from streams and rivers
Running streams are key sources of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, but why is it so? An international team of researchers, led by Umeå University, publishes the answer in the prestigious journal Nature Geoscience.

Contact: Anna-Lena Lindskog
anna-lena.lindskog@umu.se
46-907-865-878
Umea University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Better estimates of worldwide mercury pollution
An international team led by MIT researchers has conducted a new analysis that provides more accurate estimates of sources of mercury emissions around the world.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Scientific Reports
Are marine organisms evolving to protect their young in response to ocean acidification?
Marine organisms living in acidified waters exhibit a tendency to nurture their offspring to a greater extent than those in more regular conditions.

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8003
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
Decoding the genome of an alien
OIST researchers and collaborators have sequenced and analyzed an octopus genome, making it the first cephalopod to be decoded.
Molecular Genetics Unit of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Rare octopus shocks scientists with unusual mating and reproductive strategies
A remarkable yet little-known species of octopus is once again exciting the cephalopod community with its surprisingly social behavior, unconventional mating and reproductive habits, unusual predatory behavior, and unique body patterns, most of which have never before been observed among octopuses. A team of scientists -- including Richard Ross, senior aquarium biologist and cephalopod expert from the California Academy of Sciences -- will publish the results of their multi-year behavioral study this week in the journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Kelly Mendez
kmendez@calacademy.org
415-379-5133
California Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 101-110 out of 479.

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