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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 106-115 out of 355.

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Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Fish and Fisheries
History's lesson reveals depth of fish catch decline
Scientists in Australia have used historic media to measure the decline in Queensland's pink snapper fishery, highlighting a drop of almost 90 percent in catch rates since the 19th century.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Calcium loss turning lakes to 'jelly'
Declining calcium levels in some North American lakes are causing major depletions of dominant plankton species, enabling the rapid rise of their ecological competitor: a small jelly-clad invertebrate. Scientists say increasing 'jellification' will damage fish stocks and filtration systems that allow lakes to supply drinking water, and that lakes may have been pushed into 'an entirely new ecological state.'

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New paper identifies virus devastating sea stars on Pacific Coast
Specimens from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have helped explain the mysteriously sudden appearance of a disease that has decimated sea stars on the North American Pacific Coast.
National Science Foundation, Cornell University's David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
EARTH Magazine: How much natural hazard mitigation is enough?
It's a question that arises in the wake of most natural disasters: What steps can society take to protect itself from storms, floods, landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis or volcanic eruptions?

Contact: Megan Sever
msever@earthmagazine.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
NASA sees the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season awaken
The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season has formed over 300 miles from Diego Garcia. When NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Adjali the VIIRS instrument aboard took a visible picture of the storm that showed bands of thunderstorms wrapped around its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Worldwide ship traffic up 300 percent since 1992
New satellite data reveal a whopping boost in shipping.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Tiny fish provides giant insight into how organisms adapt to changing environment
An Indiana University-Dartmouth College team has identified genes and regulatory patterns that allow some organisms to alter their body form in response to environmental change.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Hanchett
jimhanch@indiana.edu
812-856-5490
Indiana University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Evolutionary constraints revealed in diversity of fish skulls
In the aquatic environment, suction feeding is far more common than biting as a way to capture prey. A new study shows that the evolution of biting behavior in eels led to a remarkable diversification of skull shapes, indicating that the skull shapes of most fish are limited by the structural requirements for suction feeding.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Densovirus named top suspect in devastating sea star wasting disease
Since 2013, millions of sea stars native to the Pacific coast of North America from Baja California to southern Alaska have succumbed to a mysterious wasting disease in which their limbs pull away from their bodies and their organs exude through their skin; a disease researchers say could trigger an unprecedented ecological upheaval under the waves.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Extinction risk not the answer for reef futures
Leading coral reef scientists in Australia and the USA say there needs to be a new approach to protecting the future of marine ecosystems, with a shift away from the current focus on extinction threat.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Showing releases 106-115 out of 355.

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