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August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 106-115 out of 313.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rethinking the reef
A new study by biologists at San Diego State University and Scripps Institution of Oceanography shows that inhabited coral islands that engage in commercial fishing dramatically alter their nearby reef ecosystems, disturbing the microbes, corals, algae and fish that call the reef home.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Tropical Storm Douglas weakening in the eastern Pacific
Tropical Storm Douglas is on a weakening trend, according to the National Hurricane Center, and satellite imagery showed that the storm appeared more elongated on July 3.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
NASA sees rainfall in newborn Tropical Depression 8W
Powerful thunderstorms in some areas of newborn Tropical Depression 08W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean were dropping heavy rainfall on July 3 as NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Arthur's cloud-covered eye
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Arthur on July 2 at 2:50 p.m. EDT on July 2, it saw a cloud-covered eye as the storm was on the way to becoming a hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Nature
Ironing out details of the carbon cycle
Iron is an essential element in all living creatures, and its availability in seawater can have a profound effect on phytoplankton growth and, consequently, the earth's carbon cycle. In the journal Nature, University of South Carolina researchers Seth John and Tim Conway have just published an assessment of the various sources of dissolved iron in the north Atlantic Ocean, establishing that a great deal of it, some 70 to 90 percent, originates from dust blowing off the Sahara desert.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Whales as ecosystem engineers
A review of research on whales shows that they have more a powerful influence on the function of oceans, global carbon storage, and the health of commercial fisheries than has been commonly assumed. The continued recovery of great whales from centuries of overhunting may help to buffer marine ecosystems from destabilizing stresses, including climate change, reports a global team of scientists led by the University of Vermont.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers from the UCA prove the existence of large accumulations of plastic in all of the oceans
Researchers from the University of Cadiz have made an unprecedented discovery: they have shown that there are five large accumulations of plastic debris in the open oceans, coinciding with the five main ocean gyres in the surface waters of the ocean. As well as the well-known accumulation of plastic rubbish in the North Pacific, these experts have proven the existence of similar accumulations in the centre of the North Atlantic, the South Pacific, the South Atlantic and the Indian Oceans.

Contact: Andres Cozar
andres.cozar@uca.es
34-956-016-267
University of Cadiz

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
The Future of Coral Reefs
Lessons from the west: Great Barrier Reef in danger
Scientists at a coral reef symposium in Canberra this week are examining degraded reefs off the Northwest Australian coast in an effort to determine what lies ahead for the Great Barrier Reef. 'Reefs north of Exmouth have experienced large-scale bleaching in the past five years,' says Professor Malcolm McCulloch from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the University of Western Australia.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Jennifer Lappin
Jennifer.Lappin@jcu.edu.au
041-774-1638
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
The Future of Coral Reefs
Decade of benefits for the Great Barrier Reef
With this week marking the tenth anniversary of the rezoning of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, prominent marine scientists from around the world have gathered in Canberra to discuss its successes -- both expected and unexpected.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Melissa Lyne
041-551-4328
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Current Biology
With 'biological sunscreen,' mantis shrimp see the reef in a whole different light
In an unexpected discovery, researchers have found that the complex eyes of mantis shrimp are equipped with optics that generate ultraviolet color vision. Mantis shrimp's six UV photoreceptors pick up on different colors within the UV spectrum based on filters made from an ingredient other animals depend on as built-in biological sunscreen, according to research reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 3.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Showing releases 106-115 out of 313.

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