Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 111-120 out of 385.

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Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Oh, snap! What snapping shrimp sound patterns may tell us about reef ecosystems
The tiny snapping shrimp's noisy habits could play a big role in reef ecology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tracey Peake
tracey_peake@ncsu.edu
919-515-6142
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
NASA sees formation of unusual North Atlantic Hurricane Alex
The low pressure area known as System 90L developed rapidly since Jan. 13 and became Hurricane Alex on Jan. 14. Several satellites and instruments captured data on this out-of-season storm. NASA's RapidScat instrument observed sustained winds shift and intensify in the system and NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm develop from a low pressure area into a sub-tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-East satellite data was made into an animation that showed the development of the unusual storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Study finds high melt rates on Antarctica's most stable ice shelf
A new Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego-led study measured a melt rate that is 25 times higher than expected on one part of the Ross Ice Shelf. The study suggests that high, localized melt rates such as this one on Antarctica's largest and most stable ice shelf are normal and keep Antarctica's ice sheets in balance.
UC San Diego's John Dove Isaacs Chair in Natural Philosophy

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Northwest Atlantic Ocean may get warmer, sooner
A new study by NOAA researchers suggests future warming of ocean waters off the Northeastern US may be greater and occur at an even faster rate than previously projected. Their findings, based on output from four global climate models of varying ocean and atmospheric resolution, indicate that ocean temperature in the US Northeast Shelf is projected to warm twice as fast as previously projected and almost three times faster than the global average.
NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
CA's state fish can benefit from restoring and protecting streamside meadows
Rising temperatures can create stressful and possibly lethal stream habitat for native trout. To help understand the interactive effects of climate warming and livestock grazing on water temperature, researchers from the Pacific Southwest Research Station and University of California, Berkeley, conducted a six-year study documenting high elevation water temperatures in areas of the Golden Trout Wilderness.

Contact: Sherri Eng
sleng@fs.fed.us
510-883-8862
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Global Change Biology
Maximizing sea life's ability to reduce atmospheric carbon may help combat climate change
New research on West Antarctic seabed life reveals that the remote region of the South Orkney Islands is a carbon sink hotspot. The findings suggest that this recently designated (and world's first) entirely high seas marine protected area may be a powerful natural ally in combating rising CO2 as sea ice melts.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA analyzes winds and rainfall in unusual Atlantic system 90L
NASA's RapidScat instrument and Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed the surface winds and rainfall rates occurring System 90L, an unusual storm in the Northern Atlantic Ocean, which may become subtropical.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA sees Ula go extra-tropical
NOAA's GOES-West satellite and NASA's RapidScat instrument provided a look at Tropical Cyclone Ula after it became extra-tropical north of New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA analyzes Hurricane Pali's rainfall rates
Tropical storm Pali intensified late on Jan. 11 to become the earliest hurricane ever recorded in the Central Pacific Ocean. Warm ocean waters from El Nino supplied the extra energy needed for Pali to develop and prosper so early in the year. NASA's GPM core observatory got an inside look at the record-breaking hurricane while the Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible-light look at the storm from above.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Climate change could cut First Nations fisheries' catch in half
First Nations fisheries' catch could decline by nearly 50 percent by 2050, according to a new study examining the threat of climate change to the food and economic security of indigenous communities along coastal British Columbia, Canada.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Showing releases 111-120 out of 385.

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