Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 111-120 out of 440.

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Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Linfa making landfall in southeastern China
Tropical Storm Linfa was making landfall in southeastern China early on July 9 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm. Linfa is now paralleling the coast in a southwesterly direction.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Chan-Hom's strongest winds in northern and eastern quadrants
The RapidScat instrument perched on the International Space Station provides measurements of surface winds and saw that Typhoon Chan-Hom's strongest winds were in its northern and western quadrants as it moved through the Marianas Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite observes Supertyphoon Nangka
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Supertyphoon Nangka on July 9 and provided a visible and an infrared view of the large storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NOAA, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie
NOAA is predicting 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years and could become the second worst behind the record-setting 2011 bloom.The bloom will be expected to measure 8.7 on the severity index with a range from 8.1 to potentially as high as 9.5. This is more severe than 2014's 6.5, and may equal or exceed 2013, which had the second worse bloom this century.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
U-M, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie
University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues predict that the 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years and could become the second-most severe behind the record-setting 2011 bloom.
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NASA's Applied Science Health and Air Quality Program, Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Erb Family Foundation, U-M Graham Sustainability Institute

Contact: Laura Lessnau
llessnau@umich.edu
734-647-1851
University of Michigan

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Nature
Where iron and water mix
A new study demonstrates that chemical-laden plumes erupted from vents at one section of Mid Ocean Ridge in the southeast Pacific can be traced all the way across the Pacific for more than 4,000 kilometers. It also shows how the iron can be brought to the surface oceans of Antarctica where it has the potential to serve as a key life-sustaining micronutrient, supporting removal of carbon from the sunlit upper waters of that ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Assessing quality of flowing waters with DNA analyses
The quality of waters can be assessed using of the organisms occurring therein. This approach often results in errors, because many species look alike. Therefore, new methods focus on DNA analyses instead. Biologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have optimized the process so that they are now able to identify many organisms at once in a quick and reliable manner using short DNA sequences. The results have been published in the PLOS ONE magazine.

Contact: Dr. Florian Leese
florian.leese@rub.de
49-234-322-5072
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Global trends show seabird populations dropped 70 percent since 1950s
UBC research shows world's monitored seabird populations have dropped 70 percent since the 1950s, a stark indication that marine ecosystems are not doing well.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science
Integrating past warm climate data, scientists hone future sea-level rise predictions
In a recent review of the science on past sea-level rise and climate change, climate scientists including Robert DeConto of the University of Massachusetts Amherst survey modeling and other methods used to reconstruct past sea levels and say we are verging on a new era of understanding how quickly the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets may respond to warming, and what rates of sea-level change might accompany such change.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Current Biology
Human activities, shifts in local species reshaping coastal biodiversity
While human activities have caused extinctions across the globe, your favorite beach or diving site may actually be home to as many, or more, species then it was a few decades ago. That's the conclusion of a synthesis of 50 years of marine biodiversity data conducted by University of British Columbia researchers.

Contact: Silvia Moreno-Garcia
silvia.moreno-garcia@science.ubc.ca
604-827-5001
University of British Columbia

Showing releases 111-120 out of 440.

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