Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 111-120 out of 484.

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Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
NASA's GPM looks inside Typhoon Goni GPM image of Goni
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite passed over Typhoon Goni and gathered data about its rainfall rates and powerful thunderstorms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Satellite sees short-lived Tropical Depression 11E
Tropical Depression 11-E appears to be short-lived as a result of strong vertical wind shear. A recent satellite image showed the clouds associated with the depression were being pushed northwest of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
New AUV plankton sampling system deployed
A group of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researchers and engineers have developed and tested an innovative new system for sampling small planktonic larvae in coastal ocean waters and understanding their distribution. Traditionally, pumps and nets are used for sampling plankton, requiring sampling at predetermined stations or towing nets behind a ship, followed by visually sorting organisms into taxonomic groups. The new system enables detection of small gradations and species-specific patterns in larval distribution.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Frogs exposed to road salt appear to benefit then suffer
A study by Case Western Reserve University biologists suggests exposure to road salt, as it runs off into ponds and wetlands where it can concentrate -- especially during March and early April, when frogs are breeding -- may increase the size of wood frogs, but also shorten their lives.

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Nature Geoscience
1,800 years of global ocean cooling halted by global warming
Prior to the advent of human-caused global warming in the 19th century, the surface layer of Earth's oceans had undergone 1,800 years of a steady cooling trend, according to a new study in the Aug. 17, 2015 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. The results also indicate that the coolest temperatures occurred during the Little Ice Age -- a period that spanned the 16th through 18th centuries and was known for cooler average temperatures over land.
National Science Foundation, NOAA, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Nature Geoscience
Frequent volcanic eruptions likely cause of long-term ocean cooling
An international team of researchers found an 1800 year-long cooling trend in the surface layer of the Earth's oceans, and that volcanic eruptions were the likely cause of the cooling from 801 to 1800 AD. The coolest temperatures were during the Little Ice Age -- that was before man-made global warming erased the cooling trend in the 1800s.
National Science Foundation, NOAA, Swiss National Science Foundation via the PAGES Project

Contact: Dr Helen McGregor
jrs_mcgregor@ship.iodp.tamu.edu
Past Global Changes IPO

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
IU paleobotanist identifies what could be the mythical 'first flower'
Indiana University paleobotanist David Dilcher and colleagues in Europe have identified a 125 million- to 130 million-year-old freshwater plant as one of earliest flowering plants on Earth.
French National Centre for Scientific Research, Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, German Funding Agency, European Commission, Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University

Contact: Kevin Fryling
kfryling@iu.edu
812-856-2988
Indiana University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Carnivorous conchs to blame for oyster decline
David Kimbro, a marine and environmental science professor at Northeastern University, has solved the mystery of why reefs in Florida inlets were experiencing large numbers of oyster loss. Drought and subsequent high salt levels in water led to a population spike in one of the oysters' main predators: conchs.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite sees birth of Tropical Depression 17W
Tropical Depression 17W came together in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Aug. 14.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees birth of Tropical Depression 16W
Tropical Depression 16W came together in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on Aug. 14.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 111-120 out of 484.

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