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Blub blub blub Established by the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography, the Discovery of Sound in the Sea project provides an extensive catalogue of animal and human acoustics in the world's oceans. Check out their audio gallery here!
Crabs Dolphin Fish Fish Seal Shark Squid Research Submarine Vent Seal and Orca

Video:Archerfish hunt by shooting jets of water at potential prey, and a Current Biology paper finds that they might be even better shots than we thought. See the video here and read about the research on EurekAlert!.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruña, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 116-125 out of 414.

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Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Pollution linked to lethal sea turtle tumors
Polluted urban and farm runoff in Hawaii has been linked to lethal tumors in endangered sea turtles. A new Duke University-led study finds that excess nitrogen in the runoff accumulates in algae that the turtles eat and can cause the disease Fibropapillomatosis which is the leading known cause of death in endangered green sea turtles. The disease causes the formation of tumors on the animals' eyes, flippers, and internal organs.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund and a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Shape up quickly -- applies to fish, too!
Fish can live in almost any aquatic environment on Earth, but when the climate changes and temperatures go up many species are pushed to the limit. The amount of time needed to adjust to new conditions could prove critical for how different species cope in the future, reveals a new study from researchers at the University of Gothenburg, published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Erik Sandblom
erik.sandblom@bioenv.gu.se
46-031-786-454-846
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts
Bacteria may have ability to reduce impact of diazepam on UK river environments
Scientists at Plymouth University and the University of Liverpool have identified a reaction pathway which could reduce the potentially harmful impact of diazepam and similar chemicals on the UK's freshwater environment.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Plymouth University leads global study examining wave energy transfer on rocky coastlines
Plymouth University is leading a £340,000 international study analyzing the ability of rocky foreshores to absorb the impact of waves on the world's coastlines.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Grouse moor burning causes widespread environmental changes
Evidence of the environmental effects of moorland burning is published today in the first authoritative scientific study on the subject, with the aim of relieving tensions on both sides of the grouse moor management debate.
Natural Environment Research Council, Yorkshire Water

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Biodiversity in the Mediterranean is threatened by alien species
Humans have introduced nearly a thousand species from other seas into the Mediterranean with very serious impact on its unique flora and fauna, finds new study to be published in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
press@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Smithsonian scientists discover coral's best defender against an army of sea stars
Coral reefs face a suite of perilous threats in today's ocean. From overfishing and pollution to coastal development and climate change, fragile coral ecosystems are disappearing at unprecedented rates. Despite this trend, some species of corals surrounding the island of Moorea in French Polynesia have a natural protector in their tropical environment: coral guard-crabs. New research has helped unravel the complex symbiotic relationship between these crabs and the coral reefs they live in and defend.
University of Florida, BIOCODE Mo'orea Project

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Physics of Fluids
Laser-guided sea monkeys show how zooplankton migrations may affect global ocean currents
Sea monkeys have captured the popular attention of both children and aquarium hobbyists because of their easily observable life cycle. Physicists are interested in a shorter-term pattern: Like other zooplankton, brine shrimp vertically migrate in large groups throughout the day in response to changing light conditions. New research suggests that the collective movement of small marine organisms could affect global ocean circulation patterns on a level comparable to the wind and the tides.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton
The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton -- microscopic aquatic plants important for fish populations and Earth's carbon cycle.
NASA

Contact: Patrick Lynch
patrick.lynch@nasa.gov
301-286-3854
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Rachel before losing hurricane status
Tropical Storm Rachel strengthened into a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 27-28, only to weaken back into a tropical storm by Sept. 29. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rachel before it weakened and took a visible picture of the storm off Baja California's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 116-125 out of 414.

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