Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 116-125 out of 390.

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Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
NASA satellite shows Tropical Cyclone Ashobaa approaching Oman
Tropical Cyclone Ashobaa continues toward a landfall in eastern Oman and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm on its approach on June 11.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
NASA saw Tropical Depression 3-E coming together
The third tropical depression of the active Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed and NASA's RapidScat saw its winds coming together as it formed. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of the storm's cloud extent showing bands of thunderstorms wrapping into its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
NASA sees powerful storms within Tropical Cyclone Ashobaa
Two NASA satellites provided a look inside and outside of Tropical Cyclone Ashobaa. NASA and JAXA's GPM satellite observed rainfall rates and cloud heights identifying powerful thunderstorms within the cyclone, and NASA's Aqua satellite provided an overall look at Ashobaa's cloud extent.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Science
Warmer, lower-oxygen oceans will shift marine habitats
Modern mountain climbers usually carry tanks of oxygen to help them reach the summit. The combination of physical exertion and lack of oxygen at high altitudes creates a major challenge for mountaineers. Now, just in time for World Oceans Day on Monday, June 8, researchers have found that the same principle applies to marine species during climate change.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Science Advances
Coral reefs defy ocean acidification odds in Palau
Will some coral reefs be able to adapt to rapidly changing conditions in Earth's oceans? If so, what will these reefs look like in the future? As the ocean absorbs atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) released by the burning of fossil fuels, its chemistry is changing. The CO2 reacts with water molecules, lowering ocean pH in a process known as ocean acidification.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Satellite shows Blanca's remnant moisture over New Mexico today
Today, June 10, the remnant moisture from Blanca is now over New Mexico where it is expected to generate some isolated to scattered thunderstorms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Molecular Ecology
Coral colonies more genetically diverse than assumed
Coral colonies are more genetically diverse than it has been assumed to date. This is the conclusion drawn by biologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, who have conducted comprehensive studies into the genetic variability in individual colonies of different reef-forming coral species. 'However, this doesn't mean we should expect that this variability can compensate for corals dying worldwide due to climate change,' says Maximilian Schweinsberg from the Department of Animal Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity.

Contact: Maximilan Schweinsberg
maximilian.schweinsberg@rub.de
49-234-322-2372
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Nature
Ice sheet collapse triggered ancient sea level peak: ANU media release
An international team of scientists has found a dramatic ice sheet collapse at the end of the ice age before last caused widespread climate changes and led to a peak in the sea level well above its present height.

Contact: Dr. Gianluca Marino
gianluca.marino@anu.edu.au
61-261-253-241
Australian National University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
BioScience
Genetically modified fish on the loose?
Transgenic fish may soon enter commercial production, but little is known about their possible effects on ecosystems, should they escape containment. Further, risk-assessment efforts are often hampered by an inability to comprehensively model the fishes' fitness in the wild.
Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology, Swedish Research Council

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Geological game changer
A long-standing fact widely accepted among the scientific community has been recently refuted, which now has major implications on our understanding of how Earth has evolved. Until recently, most geologists had determined the land connecting North and South America, the Isthmus of Panama, had formed 3.5 million years ago. But new data shows that this geological event, which dramatically changed the world, occurred much earlier.

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Showing releases 116-125 out of 390.

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