Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 121-130 out of 397.

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Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Bavi losing steam
Tropical Cyclone Bavi's convection and developing thunderstorms have been waning because of wind shear, and NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the weakening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
NASA eyes Tropical Cyclone Nathan's Australian comeback
NASA's Aqua satellite saw Tropical Storm Nathan preparing for its Australian 'comeback' as the storm made a loop in the Coral Sea and is headed back to Queensland.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
Gulf of Mexico marine food web changes over the decades
Scientists in the Gulf of Mexico now have a better understanding of how naturally-occurring climate cycles -- as well as human activities -- can cause widespread ecosystem changes. These major shifts happen once every few decades in the Gulf, and can impact ecosystem components, including fisheries. Understanding how and why these shifts occur can help communities and industries alter management strategies in light of them. NOAA Research & NOAA Fisheries scientists have teamed up with the University of Miami and University of Texas to learn more.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
RapidScat eyes Ex-Tropical Cyclone Pam's winds near Chatham Islands
The New Zealand Meteorological Service issued a Storm Warning for the Chatham Islands today as NASA's RapidScat instrument found that winds in one quadrant of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Pam is still generating tropical-storm-force winds east of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Ecosystem Health and Sustainability
Interdisciplinary, OA journal launched by the Ecological Societies of American and China
Ecosystem Health and Sustainability, the first ecological journal published cooperatively by scientific societies from two countries, fosters communication of applied ecological research across national and disciplinary boundaries. The open access journal encourages submissions from scientists in working in parts of the world experiencing rapid economic development, who are underrepresented in scholarly literature. The first issue launches with articles on global greenhouse gas emissions, ecosystem health indicators, and sustainable urban growth in fast-growing 21st century megacities.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
20-283-308-773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Conservation Biology
First global review on the status, future of Arctic marine mammals
A multinational team surveys the status of all Arctic marine mammals, including whales, walruses, seals and polar bears. The report is a first effort to assess the status of 78 subpopulations and recommend measures to protect these species under climate change.
NASA, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Can engineered carbon nanotubes help to avert our water crisis?
Carbon nanotube membranes have a bright future in addressing the world's growing need to purify water from the sea, researchers say in a study published in the journal Desalination.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
West Coast waters shifting to lower-productivity regime, new NOAA report finds
Large-scale climate patterns that affect the Pacific Ocean indicate that waters off the West Coast have shifted toward warmer, less productive conditions that may affect marine species from seabirds to salmon, according to the 2015 State of the California Current Report delivered to the Pacific Fishery Management Council. High mortality of sea lion pups in Southern California and seabirds on the Oregon and Washington coasts in recent months may be early signs of the shift.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
World's first fully integrated research facility opens in Calgary wastewater plant
For the first time, university researchers are working side-by-side with municipal operators to advance wastewater treatment technologies and knowledge that will lead to cleaner water, a better protected ecosystem and improved public health. Today, the University of Calgary and the City of Calgary unveiled the $38.5 million Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets facility at the Pine Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Contact: Sean Myers
sean.myers2@ucalgary.ca
403-220-4756
University of Calgary

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NTU Singapore ties up with the Smithsonian Institution for research in tropical ecology
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore has partnered the Smithsonian Institution, the world's largest museum and research complex based in the United States, to advance research in tropical ecology.

Contact: Lester Kok
lesterkok@ntu.edu.sg
Nanyang Technological University

Showing releases 121-130 out of 397.

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