Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 121-130 out of 385.

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Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
NASA sees out-of-season Central Pacific tropical depression form
Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed powerful thunderstorms persisting in the center of a newly developed out-of-season tropical depression in the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
NASA analyzes Tropical Storm Ula's winds
Tropical Storm Ula continued to weaken as it pulled farther away from Fiji in the Southern Pacific Ocean. NASA's RapidScat instrument found that the strongest winds in the storm were south of the center. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the storm that showed stronger thunderstorms had recently developed around its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
Scientific Reports
Penguins, food and robots
In a study reported in the Nature publication Scientific Reports, University of Delaware oceanographers consider whether Adelie penguins and gentoo penguins -- newcomers to the Palmer Station region over the last two decades -- may be competing for the same food resources and whether this might exacerbate the Adelie population decline.
National Science Foundation, NASA Biodiversity Program

Contact: Peter Bothum
pbothum@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
Science
Dam projects on world's largest rivers threaten fish species, rural livelihoods
Advocates of huge hydroelectric dam projects on the Amazon, Congo, and Mekong river basins often overestimate economic benefits and underestimate far-reaching effects on biodiversity, according to an article in the Jan. 8 issue of Science.

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
Current Biology
In Arctic winter, marine creatures migrate by the light of the moon
A few months ago, researchers reported the surprising discovery that marine creatures living in one Arctic fjord keep busy through the permanently dark and frigid winter months. Now, a report in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Jan. 7, 2016, extends this activity to the whole of the Arctic. They also find that, in the absence of any sunlight, it's the moon that drives the vertical migrations of tiny marine animals.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 6-Jan-2016
Journal of Archaeological Science
Were Panamanian islanders dolphin hunters?
Dolphins played an important part in the diet of inhabitants of Panama's Pedro Gonzalez Island 6000 years ago. Did they hunt dolphins from dugout canoes or use another technique to capture them?

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
01-150-721-28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 6-Jan-2016
Issues in Ecology
Science-driven strategies for more effective endangered species recovery
In a report released by the Ecological Society of America, 18 conservation researchers and practitioners propose six broad strategies to raise the effectiveness of the ESA for endangered species recovery, based on a thorough review of the scientific literature on the status and performance of the law.
USDA Forest Service, Resources for the Future

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 6-Jan-2016
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Housing deadline Jan. 28
Discover the latest in ocean science research at the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting, taking place from Feb. 21-26 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana. The meeting will bring together researchers from the American Geophysical Union, the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, and The Oceanography Society.

Contact: Lauren Lipuma
llipuma@agu.org
202-777-7396
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 6-Jan-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ula weakening
Tropical Cyclone Ula continued to move west, passing south of Fiji when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the weakening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jan-2016
Environmental Science & Technology
Fish-flavored cat food could contribute to feline hyperthyroidism
Over the past three decades, the number of cats diagnosed with hyperthyroidism has increased. According to research reports, many factors such as exposure to flame retardants could be responsible, and now a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology points in another direction. It suggests that fish-flavored cat food could be among the culprits.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 121-130 out of 385.

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