Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-135 out of 354.

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Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans
The oceans' sensitive skin
Ocean acidification might alter climate-relevant functions of the oceans' uppermost layer, according to a study by a group of marine scientists published in the 'Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans.' In an experiment led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the researchers observed a close coupling between biological processes in the seawater and the chemistry of the sea surface microlayer.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough shows how the 'termites of the sea' digest wood
An international research team led by Dan Distel, director of the Ocean Genome Legacy at Northeastern University, has discovered a novel digestive strategy in a wood-boring clam. The breakthrough, the researchers say, may also be a game-changer for the industrial production of clean biofuels.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
We are not alone
New work by Andrea Jani and Cherie Briggs addresses a fundamental gap in disease ecology and microbiome research.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
NASA sees System 05B fizzle in Bay of Bengal
System 05B degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on Nov. 8 and lingered near the east-central coast of India for two days before dissipating on Nov. 10.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Robotic ocean gliders aid study of melting polar ice
Caltech researchers use robotic ocean gliders to study how warm water is making its way to Antarctic ice sheets -- and how this warming ultimately leads to rising ocean levels.
National Science Foundation, NERC/Antarctic Funding Initiative, Caltech President's and Director's Fund

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
GSA Bulletin
Kīlauea, 1790 and today
Scores of people were killed by an explosive eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, in 1790. Research presented in GSA Bulletin by D.A. Swanson of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and colleagues suggests that most of the fatalities were caused by hot, rapidly moving surges of volcanic debris and steam that engulfed the victims. Deposits of such surges occur on the surface on the west summit area and cover an ash bed indented with human footprints.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
The Plant Cell
Biochemistry detective work: Algae at night
In low-oxygen conditions, some organisms such as the single-cell alga Chlamydomonas are able to generate cellular energy from the breakdown of sugars without taking up oxygen. They do this using a variety of fermentation pathways, similar to those used by yeast to create alcohol. Although critical to the survival of organisms that are found all over the planet, many of the details regarding this low-oxygen energy creation process were poorly understood.

Contact: Arthur Grossman
agrossman@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Marine Chemistry
New global maps detail human-caused ocean acidification
A team of scientists has published the most comprehensive picture yet of how acidity levels vary across the world's oceans, providing a benchmark for years to come as enormous amounts of human-caused carbon emissions continue to wind up at sea. The maps are published in the journal Marine Chemistry.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kimlynnmartineau@gmail.com
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
FAPESP Week California
FAPESP Week California to discuss Brazil-USA scientific research cooperation
FAPESP Week California will take place at California's UC Berkeley and UC Davis, Nov. 17 - 21, 2014. Brazilian and US researchers will present research findings and discuss topics related to health, advanced materials, climate, economics and society. The seminar is sponsored by the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), with support from the Brazil Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, DC.

Contact: Fernando Cunha
cunha@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4151
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Termite of the sea's wood destruction strategy revealed
Shipworms, known as 'termites of the sea,' have vexed mariners and seagoing vessels for centuries. A recent study involving scientists from the Ocean Genome Legacy Center of New England Biolabs at Northeastern University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and other institutions has focused on the shipworm Bankia setacea to learn more about the enzymes it utilizes to break down wood for nutrition, information that may prove useful for the generation of biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Showing releases 126-135 out of 354.

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