Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 131-140 out of 382.

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Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA sees Ula go extra-tropical
NOAA's GOES-West satellite and NASA's RapidScat instrument provided a look at Tropical Cyclone Ula after it became extra-tropical north of New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA analyzes Hurricane Pali's rainfall rates
Tropical storm Pali intensified late on Jan. 11 to become the earliest hurricane ever recorded in the Central Pacific Ocean. Warm ocean waters from El Nino supplied the extra energy needed for Pali to develop and prosper so early in the year. NASA's GPM core observatory got an inside look at the record-breaking hurricane while the Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible-light look at the storm from above.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Climate change could cut First Nations fisheries' catch in half
First Nations fisheries' catch could decline by nearly 50 percent by 2050, according to a new study examining the threat of climate change to the food and economic security of indigenous communities along coastal British Columbia, Canada.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Harmful Algae
Ocean current in Gulf of Mexico linked to red tide
A new study found that a major ocean current in the Gulf of Mexico plays an important role in sustaining Florida red tide blooms. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team suggest that the position of the Loop Current can serve as an indicator of whether the algal bloom will be sustained, and provide warning of possible hazardous red tide conditions in coastal areas.
The Oceans and Human Health Center at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School, National Science Foundation grant, Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Clouds, like blankets, trap heat and are melting the Greenland Ice Sheet
The Greenland Ice Sheet is the second largest ice sheet in the world and it's melting rapidly, likely driving almost a third of global sea level rise. A new study shows clouds are playing a larger role in that process than scientists previously believed.

Contact: Tristan L'Ecuyer
tlecuyer@wisc.edu
608-890-2107
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
NASA and NOAA satellite data see North Atlantic system more concentrated
NASA and NOAA satellites continue to monitor the North Atlantic Ocean's non-tropical low pressure system for hints of development into a subtropical storm. NASA's Aqua satellite provided cloud top temperatures that show where strongest storms are within the larger system, and the storm appeared more consolidated on NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
New geological evidence aids tsunami hazard assessments from Alaska to Hawaii
New geological evidence aids tsunami hazard assessments from Alaska to Hawaii.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
207-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Tropical Cyclone Ula's winds, rainfall seen by NASA's GPM and RapidScat
A weaker Tropical Storm Ula continued to move through the Southern Pacific Ocean on Jan. 11 after peaking at major hurricane status. NASA's RapidScat instrument looked at Ula's winds, while the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission satellite measured rainfall in the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
NASA's Terra satellite spots record-breaking Hurricane Pali
Shortly after NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Pali it strengthened into a record-breaking hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Tough times for the tree of life on coral reefs
Marine scientists are calling for a re-think of how marine protected areas are planned and coordinated, following a global assessment of the conservation of tropical corals and fishes. Researchers from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have analyzed the extent to which the evolutionary histories of corals and fishes are protected, rather than looking at individual species.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Showing releases 131-140 out of 382.

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