Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 131-140 out of 447.

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Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
GSA Bulletin
New database documents submarine landslides
Submarine landslides, also known as mass transport deposits (MTDs), are common in marine environments and pose risks to coastal communities and offshore infrastructure. This new 332-point database presented by Lorena Moscardelli and Lesli Wood is drawn from studies of multiple MTDs around the world. Understanding these MTDS, they write, will help determine the extent of ancient submarine landslides and contribute to the development geo-models for forecasting future submarine slides.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
NASA sees powerful winds around Typhoon Nangka's center
The RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station measured Typhoon Nangka's powerful winds as it continues to move through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Linfa approaching southeastern China coast
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a bird's eye view of Tropical Storm Linfa as it was approaching the southeastern China coast on July 8.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Typhoon Chan-Hom 'eyes' NASA's Aqua satellite
Typhoon Chan-Hom's eye was visible from space when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on July 8, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
New tropical depression forms and moves into central Pacific Ocean
Tropical Depression 4E formed in the Eastern Pacific and crossed the 140 West longitude line as of the 0300 UTC time, which brought it into the central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Environmental Engineering Science
New study shows that oil from surface-spill slicks can sink to sea floor
A first of its kind study that modeled oil slick weathering over time in a laboratory setting provides evidence that evaporation combined with sinking of the heavy components of surface-spill slicks can explain the presence of oil on the sea floor. This critical proof-of-concept addresses the ongoing controversy regarding the large amounts of oil found at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico and will impact future oil slick modeling and clean-up strategies. The study is published in Environmental Engineering Science.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Cost-effective conservation helps species bounce back
Researchers have developed a way to help ecosystems bounce back after human disturbances such as shipping, oil exploration or fishing, and have applied it to a coral reef fish species.

Contact: Quentin Grafton
quentin.grafton@anu.edu.au
61-261-256-558
Australian National University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Nature
Seafloor hot springs a significant source of iron in the oceans
A two-month voyage tracking a deep current flowing from one of the most active underwater volcanoes on Earth proves that iron released from hydrothermal vents travels thousands of miles, providing a significant source of iron to support life in the broader oceans.
NOAA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
First images of dolphin brain circuitry hint at how they sense sound
A novel DTI technique used on the preserved brains of two dolphins that died after stranding shows that at least two areas of the dolphin brain are associated with the auditory system, unlike most mammals that primarily process sound in a single area.
Facility for Education and Research, Emory University, Medical Research Council, Welcome Trust

Contact: Carol Clark
carol.clark@emory.edu
404-727-0501
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Diving dolphins are exhalation champions
How diving marine mammals escape the damaging effects of high pressure is something of a mystery. However, Andreas Fahlman from Texas A&M University and collaborators working at Dolphin Quest Oahu have discovered that the mammals have extremely compressible lungs that protect them from damage by collapsing when diving. The animals also have one of the highest ever recorded exhalation rates at 137.6 l/s, 2-3 times higher than the terrestrial champion, the horse.
US Office of Naval Research

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn@biologists.com
44-012-236-32871
The Company of Biologists

Showing releases 131-140 out of 447.

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