Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 131-140 out of 390.

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Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Science academies hand over statements for G7 summit to German Chancellor Merkel
Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann
presse@leopoldina.org
49-151-156-49436
Leopoldina

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Erosion, landslides and monsoon across the Himalayas
Scientists from Nepal, Switzerland and Germany were able to show how erosion processes caused by the monsoon are mirrored in the sediment load of a river crossing the Himalayas.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Study finds ancient clam beaches not so natural
In their second study to be published in just over a year, an SFU led team of scientists has discovered that ancient coastal Indigenous people were more than hunter-gatherers. 'We think that many Indigenous peoples worldwide had some kind of sophisticated marine management, but the Pacific Northwest is likely one of the few places in the world where this can be documented,' says SFU professor Dana Lepofsky.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Ice core reveals ocean currents transmitted climate changes from Arctic to Antarctic
A new highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica has revealed a consistent pattern of climate changes that started in the Arctic and spread across the globe to the Antarctic during planet Earth's last glacial period. Representing more than 68,000 years of climate history, data extracted from this extraordinary ice core is helping scientists understand past, rapid climate fluctuations between warm and cool periods that are known as Dansgaard-Oeschger events.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Justin Broglio
jbroglio@dri.edu
775-762-8320
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Researchers find 200-year lag between climate events in Greenland, Antarctica
A new study using evidence from a highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica shows a consistent link between abrupt temperature changes on Greenland and Antarctica during the last ice age, giving scientists a clearer picture of the link between climate in the northern and southern hemispheres.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Christo Buizert
buizertc@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
New fossil rattles Moby Dick's family tree
An international team of scientists, led by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's Curator of Marine Mammals Dr. Jorge Velez-Juarbe, has discovered a new species of an extinct pigmy sperm whale from Panama that clarifies key aspects of the evolution of the sperm whale.

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Rare sperm whale fossils discovered in Panama
Rare fossils from extinct pygmy sperm whales found in Panama indicate the bone involved in sound generation and echolocation, the spermaceti organ, reduced in size throughout the whales' evolution.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Dive discovers missing aircraft hangar of sunken WW II-era Japanese submarine
A recent survey of newly discovered submarine wreck successfully located, mapped and captured on video for the first time not only the submarine's hangar and conning tower (navigation platform), and the submarine's bell. The massive aircraft hangar, large enough to launch three float-plane bombers, was the defining feature of the I-400.

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bigger bang for your buck: Restoring fish habitat by removing barriers
A new study from a multidisciplinary team, published April 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describes a powerful new model to help decision makers maximize the cost-effectiveness of barrier removal projects that also restore migratory fish habitat.

Contact: Tom Neeson
neeson@wisc.edu
608-262-3088
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Burmese python habitat use patterns may help control efforts
The largest and longest Burmese python tracking study of its kind -- here or in its native range -- is providing researchers and resource managers new information that may help target control efforts of this invasive snake, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Showing releases 131-140 out of 390.

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