EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
Read the latest marine science news
Blub blub blub Established by the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography, the Discovery of Sound in the Sea project provides an extensive catalogue of animal and human acoustics in the world's oceans. Check out their audio gallery here!
Crabs Dolphin Fish Fish Seal Shark Squid Research Submarine Vent Seal and Orca

Video: San Diego State University scientists brought a DNA sequencer out into the field to do remote sequencing in real time, saving time compared to work traditionally done at laboratories many miles away from research sites. See the video here.
Multimedia Gallery
Red Sponge Photo
Marine Science Resources

Seal Photo
Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruña, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

Submit a Calendar Item

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 131-140 out of 379.

<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Nature
800 meters beneath Antarctic ice sheet, subglacial lake holds viable microbial ecosystems
According to LSU's Brent Christner, the paper's lead author and a researcher with the NSF-funded Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling, or WISSARD, project, 'hidden beneath a half-mile of ice in Antarctica is an unexplored part of our biosphere. WISSARD has provided a glimpse of the nature of microbial life that may lurk under more than five million square miles of ice sheet.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dawn Jenkins
djenkins1@lsu.edu
225-578-2935
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
PLOS Pathogens
From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus
A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches -- including Hawaiian coral reefs and the extreme environments of arctic soils and deep sea vents.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Cause of global warming hiatus found deep in the Atlantic Ocean
Observations shows that the heat absent from the Earth's surface for more than a decade is plunging deep in the north and south Atlantic Ocean, and is part of a naturally occurring cycle.
National Science Foundation, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate
Humans are increasingly dependent on algae, too, to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death dynamics of the algae's blooms, even when all else stays essentially the same, and this has important implications for our climate.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover
Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
Salmon forced to 'sprint' less likely to survive migration
Sockeye salmon that sprint to spawning grounds through fast-moving waters may be at risk, suggests new research by University of British Columbia scientists.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Satellite eyes a big influence on Tropical Storm Karina
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that Tropical Storm Karina's next move is based on its interaction with Tropical Storm Lowell.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Lowell's tough south side
The south side of Tropical Storm Lowell appears to be its toughest side. That is, the side with the strongest thunderstorms, according to satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-14 and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
Seals introduced tuberculosis to the New World
Seals carried tuberculosis from Africa to the Peruvian coast a new nature shows. Scientists analyzed 1,000 years old skeletons from Peru and discovered M. pinnipedii, a relative of the TB-bacterium, which affects seals today. They assume that the exploitation of seals as a dietary staple facilitated the transmission from animals to humans. These results could have an impact on the future search for a vaccine against tuberculosis. The study is published in nature.

Contact: Christian Heuss
christian.heuss@unibas.ch
41-612-848-683
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life
The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals. Their study appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 131-140 out of 379.

<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science