Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 136-145 out of 378.

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Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
ZooKeys
A new coral-inhabiting gall crab species discovered from Indonesia and Malaysia
Fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia by researcher Sancia van der Meij from Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands lead to the discovery of a new coral-dwelling gall crab. The new gall crab, named Lithoscaptus semperi, was discovered inhabiting free-living corals of the species Trachyphyllia geoffroyi on sandy bottoms near coral reefs. The study was published in the 500th issue of the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Sancia E.T. van der Meij
Sancia.vanderMeij@naturalis.nl
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Combining ecology and human needs, researchers assess sustainability of Baja fisheries
The waters of Baja California Sur are both ecosystems and fisheries where human needs meet nature. In a new study, researchers assessed the capacity to achieve sustainability by applying a framework that accounts for both ecological and human dimensions of environmental stewardship.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Brown University, Walton Family Foundation, World Wildlife Fund Fuller Fellowship Program

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Chemosphere
Diabetes drug found in freshwater is a potential cause of intersex fish
A medication commonly taken for type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish -- male fish that produce eggs, according to a study done at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Contact: Rebecca Klaper
rklaper@uwm.edu
414-382-1713
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems
A worldwide study of the interplay between organisms and their environment bolsters the idea that greater biodiversity helps maintain more stable and productive ecosystems.
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California -- Santa Barbara, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Zootaxa
NOAA, Tulane identify second possible specimen of 'pocket shark' ever found
An extraordinarily rare ocean discovery of an inches-long 'pocket shark' has been made. Sharks come in all shapes and sizes and are best known as a dominant predator in the marine food web. Understanding their movements, behaviors and anatomies gives fishery managers a better idea of their diets and relationships with other species.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Many Dry Tortugas loggerheads actually Bahamas residents
Many loggerhead sea turtles that nest in Dry Tortugas National Park head to rich feeding sites in the Bahamas after nesting, a discovery that may help those working to protect this threatened species.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
International Journal on Life in Oceans and Coastal Waters
Genetics provides new clues about lionfish invasion
New genetic data suggest the red lionfish invasion in the Caribbean Basin and Western Atlantic started in multiple locations, not just one as previously believed, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters
Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying to communicate over the sounds of ship traffic or other sources.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Are our fisheries laws working? Just ask about gag grouper
Gag grouper is the 37th stock to be rebuilt since 2000, according to the NOAA Fisheries' 2014 Status of Stocks report.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
How oil damages fish hearts: Five years of research since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Scientists have shown that toxic compounds in oil target the still-forming hearts of larval fish, leading to developmental defects and reduced survival.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Showing releases 136-145 out of 378.

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