Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 136-145 out of 492.

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Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Octopus shows unique hunting, social and sexual behavior
When the larger Pacific striped octopus was first observed in the 1970s, its unusual social and mating behavior were so strange that no one would publish it. But UC Berkeley and California Academy of Sciences researchers found it all true. It is a gregarious, not solitary octopus that even briefly cohabits with its mate. It breeds and lays eggs for months, rather than once. And it stalks prey with a unique tap on the shoulder.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Unique behaviors of larger Pacific striped octopus observed in captivity
Unique behaviors like beak-to-beak mating, den co-occupancy by a mating pair, extended spawning, and unique prey-capture were observed in captive larger Pacific striped octopus.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Molave regain tropical storm status
Tropical Depression Molave showed a burst of thunderstorm development when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on Aug. 11, as it regained tropical storm status.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
NASA analyzes Typhoon Soudelor's rainfall
Typhoon Soudelor dropped over two feet of rainfall when it made landfall in China in early August, and soaked Taiwan. NASA estimated that rainfall using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees Hurricane Hilda's strongest winds on northern side
The RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station identified Hurricane Hilda's strongest winds on the northern side of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Melting glaciers feed Antarctic food chain
Nutrient-rich water from melting Antarctic glaciers nourishes the ocean food chain, creating feeding 'hot spots' in large gaps in the sea ice, according to a new study.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
NSU researchers find more strategic culling needed to reduce lionfish invasion
Nova Southeastern University researchers find that current efforts to reduce lionfish populations aren't enough -- more must be done.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Biological Invasions
Researchers develop fast test for invasive carp
Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Metroparks Zoo researchers have developed a field test that quickly determines whether Asian grass carp, a threat to the Great Lakes, are sterile or can reproduce. Ohio and neighboring states prohibit sale of fertile grass carp but they have been found in a river feeding into Lake Erie. Scientists worry that reproducing fish could destroy food supplies and habitat essential to native species in the Great Lakes.
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Metroparks

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Scientific Reports
Non-native marine species' spread, impact explained by time since introduction
The time since the introduction of a non-native marine species best explains its global range, according to new research by an international team of scientists led by University of Georgia ecologist James E. Byers. The study, published in the open access journal Nature Scientific Reports, also contains a warning: The vast majority of marine invaders have not yet finished spreading.
Macquarie University, University of New South Wales, National Science Foundation, New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries and National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, National Sea Grant Program, Smithsonian Institution

Contact: James E. Byers
jebyers@uga.edu
706-583-0012
University of Georgia

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Geology
New digital seafloor map provides answers and more questions
Ocean sediments cover 70 percent of our planet's surface, forming the substrate for the largest ecosystem on Earth and its largest carbon reservoir -- but the most recent map of seafloor geology was drawn by hand more than 40 years ago. Now Adriana Dutkiewicz and her colleagues from the University of Sydney have carefully analyzed and categorized 15,000 seafloor sediment samples to reveal that deep ocean basins are much more complex than previously thought.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Showing releases 136-145 out of 492.

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