Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 146-155 out of 377.

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Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Science
Study: Photosynthesis has unique isotopic signature
Photosynthesis leaves behind a unique calling card, a chemical signature that is spelled out with stable oxygen isotopes, according to a new study in Science. The findings suggest isotopic signatures could exist for many biological and geological processes, including some that are difficult to observe with current tools.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Deep Carbon Observatory

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, Titan's atmosphere
This week from AGU: articles on undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, and Titan's atmosphere.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
914-552-5759
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
DNA of bacteria crucial to ecosystem defies explanation
The genome of an important bacteria contains far more 'junk DNA' than scientists expected -- making its genome more closely resemble that of a higher lifeform.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
UNH researchers discover new method to detect most common bacteria contaminating oysters
In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and sickened consumers who ate the contaminated shellfish. The new patent-pending detection method - which is available for immediate use to identify contaminated shellfish -- is a significant advance in efforts to identify shellfish harboring disease-carrying strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, US Department of Agriculture, NH Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation EPSCoR

Contact: Lori Wright
lori.wright@unh.edu
603-862-1452
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil
A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. In May 2014, a group of recreational divers spotted an adult lionfish -- the voracious invader Pterois volitans -- in the rocky reefs of southeastern Brazil.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Majorities in Arctic nations favor cooperation with Russia despite Ukraine; conflict worries rise
Commissioned by the Gordon Foundation of Toronto and Institute of the North, Anchorage, a survey of 10,000 respondents in countries with Arctic territory reveals major differences of opinion on issues ranging from Arctic co-operation with Russia to the threat of military conflict north of the 60th parallel, to whether the Northwest Passage is a Canadian or international waterway. Tables of the survey results are here: http://bit.ly/1P5a8QI.
The Gordon Foundation / Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program, Institute of the North

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
The Gordon Foundation

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Calculating how the Pacific was settled
Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, a University of Utah anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Ecosphere
Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef
New research shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish populations of the Great Barrier Reef. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that removing predatory fish such as coral trout and snapper, through fishing, causes significant changes to the make-up of the reef's fish populations.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phytoplankton, reducing greenhouse gases or amplifying Arctic warming?
Scientists with Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, and Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, presented on Monday, April 20, in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences online, the geophysical impact of phytoplankton that triggers positive feedback in the Arctic warming when the warming-induced melting of sea ice stimulates phytoplankton growth. The paper is titled 'Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.'
Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of Korea, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Ms. YunMee Jung
postech-pr@postech.ac.kr
82-054-279-2417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Extending climate predictability beyond El Niño
Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists from the USA, Australia, and Japan. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers.

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Showing releases 146-155 out of 377.

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