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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 16-25 out of 310.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Puget Sound's rich waters supplied by deep, turbulent canyon
UW oceanographers made the first detailed measurements of fast-flowing water and intense mixing in a submarine canyon just off the Washington coast.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
Fish from acidic ocean waters less able to smell predators
Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor were less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.
Australian Institute for Marine Science, National Geographic Society

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Coral Reefs
Devil in disguise: A small coral-eating worm may mean big trouble for reefs
New research from the University of Southampton has identified a coral-eating flatworm as a potential threat for coral reefs.

Contact: Jörg Wiedenmann
Joerg.wiedenmann@noc.soton.ac.uk
44-079-125-64356
University of Southampton

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Science
Study resolves controversy over nitrogen's ocean 'exit strategies'
A decades-long debate over the dominant way that nitrogen is removed from the ocean may now be settled. Researchers found that both of the nitrogen 'exit strategies,' denitrification and anammox, are at work in the oceans.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
NASA sees hurricane-strength Tropical Cyclone Ita heading toward Queensland
Tropical Cyclone Ita has been strengthening over the last two days and by April 10, Ita had become a major hurricane in the Coral Sea when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Zootaxa
Study shows 'dinosaurs of the turtle world' at risk in Southeast rivers
Conservation of coastal rivers of the northern Gulf of Mexico is vital to the survival of the alligator snapping turtle, including two recently discovered species, University of Florida scientists say.

Contact: Kenneth Krysko
kenneyk@flmnh.ufl.edu
352-273-1945
University of Florida

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Journal of Paleontology
MU researchers find rare fossilized embryos more than 500 million years old
The Cambrian Period is a time when most phyla of marine invertebrates first appeared. Also dubbed the 'Cambrian explosion,' fossilized records from this time provide glimpses into evolutionary biology. Most fossils show the organisms' skeletal structure, which may give researchers accurate pictures of these prehistoric organisms. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found rare, fossilized embryos they believe were undiscovered previously. Their methods of study may help with future interpretation of evolutionary history.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Landscape and Urban Planning
Health of ecosystems on US golf courses better than predicted
Currently, there are more than 18,300 golf courses in the US covering over 2.7 million acres. The ecological impacts of golf courses are not always straightforward with popular opinion suggesting that environmentally, golf courses have a negative impact on ecosystems. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that golf courses can offer a viable habitat for stream salamanders, and enhanced management practices may be beneficial to ecosystems within golf courses.
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
eLife
Planaria deploy an ancient gene expression program in the course of organ regeneration
In the April 15, 2014, issue of the online journal eLife, Stowers Institute for Medical Research Investigator Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado and colleagues report the identification of genes that worms use to rebuild an amputated pharynx.
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kim Bland, Ph.D.
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
ZooKeys
Name of new weakly electric fish species reflects hope for peace in Central Africa
Two new species of weakly electric fishes from the Congo River basin are described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. One of them, known from only a single specimen, is named 'Petrocephalus boboto.' 'Boboto' is the word for peace in the Lingala language, the lingua franca of the Congo River, reflecting the authors' hope for peace in troubled Central Africa.

Contact: John P. Sullivan
jpsullivan@cornell.edu
607-342-2234
Pensoft Publishers

Showing releases 16-25 out of 310.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


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