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Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video:Using state-of-the-art GPS-linked satellite tags, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Large Pelagic Research Center are tracking the complex migration habits of leatherback sea turtles. See them in action here and read about their efforts on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 151-160 out of 382.

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Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
IPCC sea-level rise scenarios not fit for purpose for high-risk coastal areas
The sea-level rise scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change do not necessarily provide the right information for high-risk coastal decision-making and management, according to new research involving scientists from the University of Southampton.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Ecology Letters
'Blue-green algae' proliferating in lakes
The organisms commonly known as blue-green algae have proliferated much more rapidly than other algae in lakes across North America and Europe over the past two centuries -- and in many cases the rate of increase has sharply accelerated since the mid-20th century, according to an international team of researchers led by scientists at McGill University.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Fonds de Recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies, Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Chris Chipello
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
A mollusk of a different stripe
Optical features embedded in marine shells may help develop responsive, transparent displays.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science
Embrace unknowns, opt for flexibility in environmental policies
Two University of Washington researchers argue in a Science perspectives piece that conservation managers must learn to make decisions about managing ecosystems and natural resources based on an uncertain future.
National Science Foundation, University of Washington

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
mBio
Sewage provides insight into human microbiome
A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Causes of Great Lakes smelt population decline are complex
The reasons for the dwindling population of smelt prey fish in the Great Lakes to near historic lows are more complicated than previously believed, new research from Purdue University and collaborators suggests.
U.S. Geological Survey

Contact: Keith Robinson
robins89@purdue.edu
765-494-2722
Purdue University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda may be developing an eye
Tropical Cyclone Glenda is strengthening in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite saw a potential eye developing when it passed overhead on Feb. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Oikos
Climate-warmed leaves change lake ecosystems, Dartmouth-led study finds
Rising soil temperatures significantly affect autumn leaves and consequently the food web, appearance and biochemical makeup of the lakes and ponds those leaves fall into, a Dartmouth College-led study finds.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Environmental Pollution
Agricultural insecticides pose a global risk to surface water bodies
Streams within approximately 40 percent of the global land surface are at risk from the application of insecticides. These were the results from the first global map to be modeled on insecticide runoff to surface waters, which has just been published in the journal Environmental Pollution by researchers from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research and the University of Koblenz-Landau together with the University of Milan, Aarhus University and Aachen University.
European Commission, German Ministry for Education and Research

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
BioScience
Isolated wetlands have significant impact on water quality
Geographically isolated wetlands play an outsized role in providing clean water and other environmental benefits even though they may lack the regulatory protections of other wetlands, according to an article by Indiana University researchers and colleagues.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Showing releases 151-160 out of 382.

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