Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-160 out of 318.

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Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Global Inland Fisheries Conference
Fish catch break on world stage at global conference
Freshwater fish provide the food, sport and economic power across the globe. Inland fishing is often about individuals, families and small cooperatives. More than 60 million people in low-income nations are estimated to rely on inland fisheries for their livelihood. Its small-but-many base has in modern times across the globe been shy of strong data to document its impact. That has left the inland fishery industry a poor competitor for water against agriculture, energy, commercial development and industry.

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-2026
Michigan State University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Nature Climate Change
Climate change redistributes fish species at high latitudes
For millions of years, large parts of the marine biotas of the North Atlantic and North Pacific have been separated by harsh climate conditions in the Arctic. A new study published in Nature Climate Change underlines that climate change has begun to weaken this natural barrier promoting the interchange of fishes between the two oceans along with many ecological and economic consequences.

Contact: Peter Gr&ostroke;nkjær
peter.groenkjaer@bios.au.dk
45-23-38-21-77
Aarhus University

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later' published by The Oceanography Society
The Oceanography Society is pleased to announce publication of 'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later.' This supplement to the December issue of Oceanography magazine reviews the progress that has been made over the last 10 years in addressing barriers to career advancement for women oceanographers and where further attention to this issue might still be needed. TOS published its first 'Women in Oceanography' volume in March 2005.

Contact: Dr. Ellen Kappel
ekappel@geo-prose.com
301-229-2709
The Oceanography Society

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Fisheries
MSU-led research finds cause for decline of Missouri River pallid sturgeon
Oxygen-depleted dead zones between dams in the upper Missouri River have been directly linked with the failure of endangered pallid sturgeon embryos to survive according to a study published today in the journal Fisheries.

Contact: Sepp Jannotta
seppjannotta@montana.edu
406-994-7371
Montana State University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Fisheries
Culprit identified in decline of endangered Missouri River pallid sturgeon
Oxygen-depleted dead zones between dams in the upper Missouri River have been directly linked with the failure of endangered pallid sturgeon hatched embryos to survive, according to a study published today in the journal Fisheries.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Catherine Puckett
cpuckett@usgs.gov
352-377-2469
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Biology Letters
Warming seas decrease sea turtle basking
Green sea turtles may stop basking on beaches around the world within a century due to rising sea temperatures, a new study suggests. Basking helps the turtles regulate body temperature and may aid their immune system and digestion. By analyzing six years of turtle surveys and 24 years of satellite data, researchers have found the turtles bask more often when sea surface temperatures are lower. This vital behavior may cease globally by 2102 if global warming trends continue.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Arctic ice cap slides into the ocean
Satellite images have revealed that a remote Arctic ice cap has thinned by more than 50 meters since 2012 -- about one sixth of its original thickness -- and that it is now flowing 25 times faster.

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-34196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Oecologia
Sisters act together
A team of researchers from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna studied cichlid fishes in Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. The researchers observed that female fish dispersed longer distances from their natal grounds than males. To minimize risks and to secure the spread of their genetic information, females often swim together in a shoal with female siblings. Males prefer shoaling with non-siblings. The results were recently published in the journal Oecologia.

Contact: Heike Hochhauser
heike.hochhauser@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1151
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Geosphere
Alamo impact crater: New study could double its size
Carbonate rock deposits found within the mountain ranges of south-central Nevada, USA, record evidence of a catastrophic impact event known as the Alamo impact. This event occurred roughly 382 million years ago when the ancient seafloor was struck and a submarine crater was formed. The crater was filled-in with fragmented rock, and later with more typical ocean deposits, as the energy from the impact lessened and the environment returned to normal.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Niko's romp through society
After making its social debut in the Southern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone Niko moving through the Society Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 151-160 out of 318.

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