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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 156-165 out of 310.

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Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Heart
High consumption of fish oil may benefit cardiovascular health, Pitt public health finds
Eating fish in amounts comparable to those of people living in Japan seems to impart a protective factor that wards off heart disease, according to an international study funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Middle-aged Japanese men living in Japan had lower incidence of coronary artery calcification, a predictor of heart disease, than middle-aged white men living in the United States.
National Institutes of Health, Japanese Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Sea-level rise threatens UNESCO World Heritage sites
Some of the world's most recognisable and important landmarks could be lost to rising sea-levels if current global warming trends are maintained over the next two millennia.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Cultural world heritage threatened by climate change
From the Statue of Liberty in New York to the Tower of London or the Sydney Opera House -- sea-level rise not only affects settlement areas for large parts of the world population but also numerous sites of the UNESCO World Heritage. This is shown in a new study by Ben Marzeion from the University of Innsbruck and Anders Levermann from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

Contact: Mareike Schodder
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles 'lost years' mystery starts to unravel
Small satellite-tracking devices attached to sea turtles swimming off Florida's coast have delivered first-of-its-kind data that could help unlock they mystery of what endangered turtles do during the 'lost years.'
NOAA

Contact: Zenaida Kotala
zenaida.kotala@ucf.edu
407-446-6567
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
NASA sees strong thunderstorms around Tropical Cyclone Kofi
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Kofi in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an infrared image of the storm revealing powerful thunderstorms around center of circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Marine Biology
Distinctive flashing patterns might facilitate fish mating
Scientists have shown for the first time that deep-sea fishes that use bioluminescence for communication are diversifying into different species faster than other glowing fishes that use light for camouflage. The new research indicates that bioluminescence -- a phenomenon in which animals generate visible light through a chemical reaction -- could promote communication and mating in the open ocean, an environment with few barriers to reproduction. The study was recently published in the journal Marine Biology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees some towering thunderstorms around Faxai's center
Towering thunderstorms and heavy rainfall were occurring around the center of Tropical Storm Faxai in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean, and were seen by the TRMM satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The surface of the sea is a sink for nitrogen oxides at night
The surface of the sea takes up nitrogen oxides that build up in polluted air at night, new measurements on the coast of southern California have shown. The ocean removes about 15 percent of these chemicals overnight along the coast, a team of atmospheric chemists reports in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of March 3.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Bertram
scinews@ucsd.edu
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Mar-2014
Nature Climate Change
Global warming felt to deepest reaches of ocean
A new study led by researchers from McGill University suggests that the the 1970s polynya in the Antarctic sea ice pack of the Weddell Sea may have been the last gasp of what was previously a more common feature of the Southern Ocean, and which is now suppressed due to the effects of climate change on ocean salinity.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 1-Mar-2014
Geology
What sculpted Africa's margin?
Break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana about 130 Million years ago could have lead to a completely different shape of the African and South American continent with an ocean south of today's Sahara desert.

Contact: F. Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Showing releases 156-165 out of 310.

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