Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 156-165 out of 404.

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Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
GPM sees wind shear affecting remnants of Extra-tropical Cyclone Joalane
The GPM satellite showed the effects of wind shear and waning rainfall rates in Extra-tropical Cyclone Joalane as it was moving in a southeasterly direction through the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
New tool to connect geoscience information to decision makers
The Critical Issues Research Database seeks to connect end-users to the wealth of information available on issues at the intersection of geoscience and society such as the occurrence of natural resources, hazard mitigation and pollution risks.

Contact: Leila Gonzales
lmg@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Science
Repeated marine predator evolution tracks changes in ancient and Anthropocene oceans
A team of Smithsonian scientists synthesized decades of scientific discoveries to illuminate the common and unique patterns driving the extraordinary transitions that whales, dolphins, seals and other species underwent as they moved from land to sea. Drawing on recent breakthroughs in diverse fields such as paleontology, molecular biology and conservation ecology, their findings offer a comprehensive look at how life in the ocean has responded to environmental change from the Triassic to the Anthropocene.
Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Katie Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Video: Octopuses have unique way to control their 'odd' forms
The body plan of octopuses is nothing if not unique, with a sophisticated brain in a soft, bilaterally symmetrical body, encircled by eight radially symmetrical and incredibly flexible arms. Now, researchers reporting the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling show that the animals have a unique motor control strategy to match their 'odd' form. The researchers report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 16.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Study will parse evolutionary shift between life in water and on land
University of Kansas researcher Andrew Short will analyze South American water scavenger beetles' transition between aquatic and terrestrial living -- and in the process learn more about the mechanics of evolution itself.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Longest mammal migration raises questions about distinct species
A team of scientists from the United States and Russia has documented the longest migration of a mammal ever recorded -- a round-trip trek of nearly 14,000 miles by a whale identified as a critically endangered species that raises questions about its status as a distinct species.
US Office of Naval Research, Exxon Neftegas Limited

Contact: Bruce Mate
bruce.mate@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0202
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Research details 40 million-year-old family tree of baleen whales
New research from New Zealand's University of Otago is providing the most comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of baleen whales, which are not only the largest animals ever to live on earth, but also among the most unusual.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, The Geoscience Society of New Zealand, The Scottish Association for Marine Science, The Systematic Association/Linnean Society of London, The Paleontological Society

Contact: Felix Mars
felix.marx@otago.ac.nz
81-029-853-8263
University of Otago

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Paleoceanography
Climate connections
Global climate has undergone periods of stability, but also instability, with abrupt, rapid and substantial climate changes occurring as a consequence of natural processes scientists still don't understand. University of South Carolina paleoceanographer Kelly Gibson contributed to the field in a recent paper, which demonstrates the influence of rapid climate change on marine ecosystems near Venezuela tens of thousands of years ago and shows how changes there were accompanied by simultaneous changes globally.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Ecosphere
The life force of African rivers
A new study shows the ecological importance of hippopotamus-vectored subsidies.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Seeing the unseen: PET/CT scans reveal worms' hidden life
What are lugworms and other small animals doing in the seabed? Until now scientists have not been able to study these animals without disturbing them, but thanks to modern PET/CT scans, now we can study their hidden life.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Showing releases 156-165 out of 404.

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