Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 156-165 out of 478.

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Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
BMC Ecology Image Competition 2015 winners announced
This year's BMC Ecology Image Competition includes photos showing a Palestinian sunbird's careful maneuvers, endangered storks foraging in a garbage dump and a pregnant bat in mid-flight. The 32 images showcase a diverse range of interspecies relationships, from seemingly-unlikely symbiotic partnerships, to the perilous world of predation and carnivorous plants.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2243
BioMed Central

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Treating ships' ballast water: Filtration preferable to disinfection
Untreated ballast water discharge from ships can spread living organisms and even pathogens across the world thereby introducing non-native or invasive species into the local environment. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München therefore recommend using physical treatment processes such as filtration rather than electrochemical disinfection, which creates countless potentially toxic compounds. These are the findings of a recent study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Contact: Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin
schmitt-kopplin@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-3246
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
Scientists urge ban on salamander imports to fend off deadly fungus
California amphibian experts warn that a recently discovered fungus already devastating salamanders in Europe could imperil American salamanders, and urge the US Fish and Wildlife Service to immediately halt salamander imports until there is a plan to detect and prevent spread of the fungus. SF State University, UC Berkeley and UCLA biologists say the fungus, dubbed Bsal, is worse than the Bd chytrid fungus that has brought more than 200 amphibian species worldwide near extinction.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Conservation Physiology
New study exposes negative effects of climate change on Antarctic fish
Scientists at University of California Davis and San Francisco State University have discovered that the combination of elevated levels of carbon dioxide and an increase in ocean water temperature has a significant impact on survival and development of the Antarctic dragonfish (Gymnodraco acuticeps). The research article was published today in the journal Conservation Physiology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Chloe Foster
chloe.foster@oup.com
44-186-535-3584
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
Nature has more than one way to grow a crystal
The findings in the journal Science have implications for questions regarding how animals and plants grow minerals into shapes that have no relation to their original crystal symmetry, and why some contaminants are difficult to remove from stream sediments.

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Study of 'senior citizen' marine snails uncovered how nerve cells fail during learning
A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers' findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans.
National Institutes of Health, Maytag Foundation, Korein Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Rogue wave theory to save ships
Physicists have found an explanation for rogue waves in the ocean and hope their theory will lead to devices to warn ships and save lives.

Contact: Nail Akhmediev
Nail.Akhmediev@anu.edu.au
61-261-250-191
Australian National University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Acta Materialia
Boxfish shell inspires new materials for body armor and flexible electronics
The boxfish's unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Environment and Behavior
Aquariums deliver health and wellbeing benefits
In the first study of its kind, the team found that viewing aquarium displays led to noticeable reductions in blood pressure and heart rate, and that higher numbers of fish helped to hold people's attention for longer and improve their moods.

Contact: Alex Smalley
a.j.smalley@exeter.ac.uk
0044-187-225-8135
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Researchers provide new details about sea stars' immunity
A study led by a University of Texas at Arlington graduate student examining sea stars dying along the West Coast provides new clues about the starfish's immune response and its ability to protect a diverse coastal ecosystem.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Showing releases 156-165 out of 478.

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