Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 161-170 out of 386.

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Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Beneficial bacteria in Hawaiian squid attracted to fatty acids
A study published recently by scientists at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa and University of Wisconsin - Madison revealed that the Hawaiian bobtail squid's symbiotic bacteria, Vibrio fischeri, has a novel type of receptors that sense the presence and concentration of fatty acids, a building block of all cell membranes.

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Food Security
Infectious disease spread is fueled by international trade
International trade and travel has literally opened up new vistas for humans, ranging from travel to exotic places to enjoying the products and services of those distant lands. But along with international trade and travel comes the risk of spreading infectious diseases, a growing problem in today's global economy, says an Arizona State University researcher.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Mystery of heat loss from the Earth's crust has been solved
The first discovery of a new type of hydrothermal vent system in a decade helps explain the long observed disconnect between the theoretical rate at which the Earth's crust is cooling at seafloor spreading ridge flanks, and actual observations. It could also help scientists interpret the evidence for past global climates more accurately.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
07-415-876-517
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Global Change Biology
Corals may fare better in turbid waters, Florida Tech research finds
New research from Florida Institute of Technology scientists Chris Cacciapaglia and Rob van Woesik shows that corals may survive better in warm oceans where the water is clouded by floating particles.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Citizens for Science

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Harmful Algae
Increased toxicity due to migration?
A seaweed from Asia -- used for human nutrition -- contains toxic compounds providing protection against animal consumers. However, newly introduced populations of the alga in North America and Europe contain considerably more of the deterrents.

Contact: Andreas Villwock
avillwock@geomar.de
49-431-600-2802
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Harmful algal blooms and water quality
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur naturally, but their outbreaks are influenced by climate change and droughts, nutrient enrichment and manmade factors, such as contaminants from sewage and stormwater discharge, natural resource extraction or agricultural runoff, to name a few. An article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry explores inland surface water quality assessment, research on HABs and management practices in an effort to identify the current challenges and seek solutions to the threats HABs present to public health and the environment.

Contact: Jen Lynch
jen.lynch@setac.org
850-469-1500
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Journal of Transport Geography
Rail line disruption set for dramatic increase as sea levels continue to rise
Rail services to and from the South West of England could be disrupted for more than 10 percent of each year by 2040 and almost one-third by 2100, a new study suggests.

Contact: Alan Williams
bigals22@hotmail.com
01-752-588-004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Biological Conservation
Scientists discover rare sea snakes, previously thought extinct, off Western Australia
Scientists from James Cook University have discovered two critically endangered species of sea snakes, previously thought to be extinct, off the coast of Western Australia. It's the first time the snakes have been spotted alive and healthy since disappearing from their only known habitat on Ashmore Reef in the Timor Sea more than fifteen years ago.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
2015 AGU Fall Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rivers, lakes impact ability of forests to store carbon
Forests help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by storing it in trees, but a sizeable amount of the greenhouse gas actually escapes through the soil and into rivers and streams.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Melting sea ice increases Arctic precipitation, complicates climate predictions
The melting of sea ice will significantly increase Arctic precipitation, creating a climate feedback comparable to doubling global carbon dioxide, a Dartmouth College-led study finds.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Showing releases 161-170 out of 386.

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