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August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 166-175 out of 319.

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Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Molecular Ecology
Genetics reveal that reef corals and their algae live together but evolve independently
New research reveals that Caribbean corals and the algae that inhabit them form a remarkably stable relationship -- new knowledge that can serve as an important tool in preserving and restoring vital reef-building corals. The research could be used to decide which heat-tolerant corals to bring into nurseries, to grow, and to replant back on the reef to restore healthy coral populations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Public gets first view of a live vampire squid and other deep-sea cephalopods
From the vampire squid to the flapjack octopus, deep-sea cephalopods are both fascinating and mysterious. Since April, members of the public have been able to see these animals for the first time, as part of the ongoing 'Tentacles' special exhibition at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. A collaborative effort with the aquarium's partner institution, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, this exhibit is providing new scientific insights into the lives of these mysterious animals.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Coral, human cells linked in death
Humans and corals are about as different from one another as living creatures get, but a new finding reveals that in one important way, they are more similar than anyone ever realized. A biologist at San Diego State University has discovered they share the same biomechanical pathway responsible for triggering cellular self-destruction. The finding has implications for biologists, conservationists and medical researchers.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
NOAA scientists find mosquito control pesticide low risk to juvenile oysters, hard clams
Four of the most common mosquito pesticides used along the east and Gulf coasts show little risk to juvenile hard clams and oysters, according to a NOAA study. However, the study, published in the on-line journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, also determined that lower oxygen levels in the water, known as hypoxia, and increased acidification actually increased how toxic some of the pesticides were. Such climate variables should be considered when using these pesticides in the coastal zone, the study concluded.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
System 90L was an area of tropical low pressure that never managed to form into a tropical depression during its lifetime, but did drop heavy rainfall on eastern and southeastern Mexico before dissipating.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite analyzes Mexico's soaking tropical rains
The movement of tropical storm Boris into southern Mexico and a nearly stationary low pressure system in the southern Gulf of Mexico caused heavy rainfall in that area. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM acts like a 'rain gauge in space' and calculated that one area received almost 2 feet of rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
NHAES research: New England lakes recovering rapidly from acid rain
For more than 40 years, policy makers have been working to reduce acid rain, a serious environmental problem that can devastate lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and animals that live in these ecosystems. Now new research funded by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture indicates that lakes in New England and the Adirondack Mountains are recovering rapidly from the effects of acid rain.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station

Contact: William McDowell
bill.mcdowell@unh.edu
603-862-2249
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Geoscience
Warming climates intensify greenhouse gas given out by oceans
Rising global temperatures could increase the amount of carbon dioxide naturally released by the world's oceans, fueling further climate change, a study suggests.
Scottish Alliance for Geoscience Environment Society, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
NASA and NOAA satellites are gathering visible, infrared, microwave and radar data on a persistent tropical low pressure area in the southwestern Bay of Campeche. System 90L now has a 50 percent chance for development, according to the National Hurricane Center and continues to drop large amounts of rainfall over southeastern Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Asymmetric continental margins and the slow birth of an ocean
When South America split from Africa 150 to 120 million years ago, the South Atlantic formed and separated Brazil from Angola. The continental margins formed through this separation are surprisingly different.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Showing releases 166-175 out of 319.

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