Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 171-180 out of 440.

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Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Toxicological Sciences
Flatworms could replace mammals for some toxicology tests
Laboratories that test chemicals for neurological toxicity could reduce their use of laboratory mice and rats by replacing these animal models with tiny aquatic flatworms known as freshwater planarians.
National Institutes of Health, Hellman Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Young Researchers Award winner to help advance biodiversity informatics in South Africa
Fatima Parker-Allie, a South African Ph.D. student, is a recipient of the GBIF Young Researchers' Award for 2015. Parker-Allie seeks to advance the biodiversity informatics in South Africa in three complementary areas: The development of a national BSc (honors) curriculum for biodiversity informatics; data quality improvements that make biodiversity data more fit for use in research applications; and distribution models of commercially important fish species in southern African waters under different climate scenarios.

Contact: Sampreethi Aipanjiguly
saipanjiguly@gbif.org
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Freshwater and ocean acidification stunts growth of developing pink salmon
Pink salmon that begin life in freshwater with high concentrations of carbon dioxide, which causes acidification, are smaller and may be less likely to survive, according to a new study from UBC.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Retreating sea ice linked to changes in ocean circulation, could affect European climate
Retreating sea ice in the Iceland and Greenland Seas may be changing the circulation of warm and cold water in the Atlantic Ocean, and could ultimately impact the climate in Europe, says a new study by an atmospheric physicist from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) and his colleagues in Great Britain, Norway and the United States.

Contact: Nicolle Wahl
nicolle.wahl@utoronto.ca
905-569-4656
University of Toronto

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
CCNY researchers develop eco-friendly oil spill solution
City College of New York researchers led by chemist George John have developed an eco-friendly biodegradable green 'herding' agent that can be used to clean up light crude oil spills on water.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
Why are seabirds abandoning their ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California?
A group of researchers from Mexico and the United States has found that warming oceanographic conditions and fishing pressure are driving nesting seabirds away from their ancestral breeding ground in Mexico into California harbors.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A 'hydrothermal siphon' drives water circulation through the seafloor
Vast quantities of ocean water circulate through the seafloor, flowing through the volcanic rock of the upper oceanic crust. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, published June 26 in Nature Communications, explains what drives this global process and how the flow is sustained.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Endangered Species Research
A tale of two whales
A new study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego indicates a steady population trend for blue whales and an upward population trend for fin whales in Southern California.
Office of Naval Research, Chief of Naval Operations N45, US Pacific Fleet

Contact: Brittany Hook or Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Heredity
Starfish that clone themselves live longer
Starfish that reproduce through cloning avoid ageing to a greater extent than those that propagate through sexual reproduction. This is shown by a new research study in which researchers from the University of Gothenburg participated. The study has recently been published in the highly respected journal Heredity.

Contact: Carina Eliasson
carina.eliasson@gu.se
46-317-869-873
University of Gothenburg

Showing releases 171-180 out of 440.

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