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August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 171-180 out of 320.

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Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite analyzes Mexico's soaking tropical rains
The movement of tropical storm Boris into southern Mexico and a nearly stationary low pressure system in the southern Gulf of Mexico caused heavy rainfall in that area. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM acts like a 'rain gauge in space' and calculated that one area received almost 2 feet of rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
NHAES research: New England lakes recovering rapidly from acid rain
For more than 40 years, policy makers have been working to reduce acid rain, a serious environmental problem that can devastate lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and animals that live in these ecosystems. Now new research funded by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture indicates that lakes in New England and the Adirondack Mountains are recovering rapidly from the effects of acid rain.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station

Contact: William McDowell
bill.mcdowell@unh.edu
603-862-2249
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Geoscience
Warming climates intensify greenhouse gas given out by oceans
Rising global temperatures could increase the amount of carbon dioxide naturally released by the world's oceans, fueling further climate change, a study suggests.
Scottish Alliance for Geoscience Environment Society, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
NASA and NOAA satellites are gathering visible, infrared, microwave and radar data on a persistent tropical low pressure area in the southwestern Bay of Campeche. System 90L now has a 50 percent chance for development, according to the National Hurricane Center and continues to drop large amounts of rainfall over southeastern Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Asymmetric continental margins and the slow birth of an ocean
When South America split from Africa 150 to 120 million years ago, the South Atlantic formed and separated Brazil from Angola. The continental margins formed through this separation are surprisingly different.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Science
LSU biologist John Caprio, Japanese colleagues identify unique way catfish locate prey
John Caprio, George C. Kent Professor of Biological Sciences at LSU, and colleagues from Kagoshima University in Japan have identified that these fish are equipped with sensors that can locate prey by detecting slight changes in the water's pH level.

Contact: Aaron Looney
alooney@lsu.edu
225-578-3871
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How do phytoplankton survive a scarcity of a critical nutrient?
How do phytoplankton survive when the critical element phosphorus is difficult to find? Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences conducted the most comprehensive survey of the content and distribution of a form of phosphorus called polyphosphate, or poly-P in the western North Atlantic. What they found was surprising.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Storm Boris merging with Gulf low
The remnants of former Tropical Storm Boris moved over southern Mexico and NASA and NOAA satellite data showed that they were merging with a low pressure area in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Report supports shutdown of all high seas fisheries
Fish and aquatic life living in the high seas are more valuable as a carbon sink than as food and should be better protected, according to research from the University of British Columbia.
Global Ocean Commission

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-828-3867
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Sea star disease epidemic surges in Oregon, local extinctions expected
Just in the past two weeks, the incidence of sea star wasting syndrome has exploded along the Oregon Coast and created an epidemic of historic magnitude, one that threatens to decimate Oregon's entire population of purple ochre sea stars. Prior to this, Oregon had been the only part of the West Coast that had been largely spared this devastating disease.
Oregon Sea Grant

Contact: Kristen Milligan
milligak@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8862
Oregon State University

Showing releases 171-180 out of 320.

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