Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video:Using state-of-the-art GPS-linked satellite tags, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Large Pelagic Research Center are tracking the complex migration habits of leatherback sea turtles. See them in action here and read about their efforts on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 171-180 out of 382.

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Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
University of Tennessee professor receives prestigious award for ocean science work
Karen Lloyd's work with subsea floor mud and frozen Siberian soil has earned her an extraordinarily competitive award. The assistant professor of microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has been selected as a 2015 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy Blakely
ablakely@utk.edu
865-974-5034
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Via laser into the past of the oceans
Using cutting edge technologies experts of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel together with colleagues from the UK, Canada and the United States were able to reconstruct pH values of the Northern Pacific with a high resolution since the end of the 19th century. The study, which has been published in the current issue of the international journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a clear acidification trend, but also strong seasonal fluctuations.
Federal Ministry of Education and Sciences of Germany-BIOACID, National Science and engineering Resource Council, Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jan Steffen
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Sloan Research Fellowships awarded to 126 young scholars
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding US and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders. Fellows receive $50,000 to further their research.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Nate Williams
williams@sloan.org
212-649-1692
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Community-led marine reserve produces benefits for fisheries and conservation
The first and only fully protected marine reserve in Scotland is continuing to provide benefits for fisheries and conservation, according to new research by the University of York.

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Scientists bring oxygen back to dead fjord
More and more of the world's waters are seriously lacking oxygen. Could we use pumps to bring oxygen and thus higher life back into these waters? A Danish/Swedish research team says yes. They installed pumps in a Swedish fjord that showed a strong oxygen deficit and now they report that all the right oxygen-loving organisms have come back to the fjord.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
Study outlines threat of ocean acidification to coastal communities in US
Coastal communities in 15 states that depend on the $1 billion shelled mollusk industry (primarily oysters and clams) are at long-term economic risk from the increasing threat of ocean acidification, a new report concludes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: George Waldbusser
waldbuss@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8964
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists discover bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for the reef community
The study reports finding significant accumulations of polyphosphate granules in three common sponge species of the Caribbean coral reef, indicating that microorganisms that live on marine sponges are pulling phosphorus out of the water to feed themselves and survive in a deep-water environment where very few nutrients are available. This finding has important implications for understanding how phosphorus is sequestered and recycled in a reef environment.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Tracking invasives? There's an app for that
Invasive species will have a tougher time sneaking around undetected, thanks to an app developed by Michigan State University. Midwestern residents can now snap photos with their smart phones, log a few quick notes and send their alert to a growing network of scientists and state officials who can use this critical information to increase response to these threats. The free app is one component of the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network, developed by Amos Ziegler, MSU biogeographer.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
NASA saw heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Marcia
As Tropical Cyclone Marcia was nearing the Queensland coast, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM measured its rainfall from space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
NASA-JAXA's TRMM satellite sees rapid intensification of category-5 Marcia
At 11 p.m. local time (1324 UTC) on Feb. 19, 2015, the Precipitation Radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite observed the eyewall of Tropical Cyclone Maria in the Coral Sea. At that time, Marcia was rapidly intensifying to category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, a little more than 12 hours before an expected landfall in Queensland, Australia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 171-180 out of 382.

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