Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 181-190 out of 396.

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Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science
Greatest mass extinction driven by acidic oceans, study finds
Changes to the Earth's oceans, caused by extreme volcanic activity, triggered the greatest extinction of all time, a study suggests.
International Centre for Carbonate Reservoirs, Natural Environment Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, German Research Foundation, Marsden Fund

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Ocean myth busted: 'Toddler' sea turtles are very active swimmers
It turns out sea turtles, even at a tender 6-18 months of age, are very active swimmers. They don't just passively drift in ocean currents as researchers once thought. NOAA and University of Central Florida researchers say it's an important new clue in the sea turtle 'lost years' mystery. Where exactly turtles travel in their first years of life, before returning to coastal areas as adults to forage and reproduce, has puzzled scientists for decades.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Cell
In the sea, a deadly form of leukemia is catching
Outbreaks of leukemia that have devastated some populations of soft-shell clams along the east coast of North America for decades can be explained by the spread of cancerous tumor cells from one clam to another. Researchers call the discovery, reported in the Cell Press journal Cell on April 9, 2015, 'beyond surprising.'
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Recovery potential for the world's coral reef fish
A simple test of the number of fish living on a coral reef can be used as a road map to restore degraded reefs and fishers' livelihoods according to a global study published in the journal Nature.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Mysteries of the deep
Scientists who have spent much of their careers in deep-sea submersibles observing coral and sponges are sharing their experiences and expertise through innovative online seminars.

Contact: Michael Milstein
Michael.Milstein@noaa.gov
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
NASA analyzes rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Joalane
NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite provided scientists with a look 'under the hood' of Tropical Cyclone Joalane's clouds at the rate in which rain was falling throughout the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Recipe for saving coral reefs: Add more fish
Fish are the key ingredients in a new recipe to diagnose and restore degraded coral reef ecosystems, according to scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science, the Wildlife Conservation Society, James Cook University and other organizations in a new study in the journal Nature.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees the end of Tropical Cyclone Ikola
Strong vertical wind shear has taken a toll on Tropical Cyclone Ikola and that was pretty clear in a visible-light image from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite today, April 8.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Palaeontology
Newly discovered ancient arthropod lived hundreds of millions of years ago
The Burgess Shale Formation, in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the most famous fossil locations in the world. A recent Palaeontology study introduces a 508 million year old (middle Cambrian) arthropod -- called Yawunik kootenayi -- from exceptionally preserved specimens of the new Marble Canyon locality within the Burgess Shale Formation.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Paleobiology
X-raying the past: New insights into the life of extinct marine creatures
Using state-of-the-art imaging techniques, palaeontologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have been examining extinct marine creatures. Quantitative analyses provide new evidence that ammonites were able to swim using their shell -- very much like the recent nautilus. For the purpose of the study, the researchers, together with partners from the industry, developed an evaluation process for high-res CT images. The science magazine 'RUBIN' reports about the results.

Contact: Dr René Hoffmann
Rene.Hoffmann@rub.de
49-234-322-7769
Ruhr-University Bochum

Showing releases 181-190 out of 396.

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