Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 181-190 out of 473.

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Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
NASA's GPM sees dry air affecting Typhoon Halola
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core observatory passed over Typhoon Halola and saw that the northern side of the storm lacked rainfall. Dry air moving into the storm from the north was sapping the development of thunderstorms on that side of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Journal of Mammalogy
SeaWorld's killer whales live as long as their wild counterparts
A new peer-reviewed study published in the Journal of Mammalogy by the Oxford University Press adds important insights to the debate over how long killer whales in human care live. The study found no difference in life expectancy between killer whales born at SeaWorld and a well-studied population of wild killer whales.

Contact: Fred Jacobs
fred.jacobs@seaworld.com
SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc.

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Missoula's Sunburst sensors wins XPRIZE for ocean device
Sunburst Sensors LLC, a company resulting from University of Montana research, won $1.5 million in XPRIZE funding on July 20 for producing the best device to affordably, accurately and efficiently measure ocean chemistry.
Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE

Contact: Mike DeGrandpre
michael.degrandpre@mso.umt.edu
406-243-4118
The University of Montana

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Satellite sees birth of Tropical Storm Felicia in Eastern Pacific Ocean
Tropical Storm Felicia was born early on July 23 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, over 400 miles southwest of Baja California's southern tip. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an infrared image of the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
NASA sees newborn Tropical Depression 12W near northeastern tip of Philippines
When Tropical Depression 12W formed on the northeastern tip of the Philippines in the Luzon Region, NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
NASA looks inside Typhoon Halola
Satellite technology has the ability to see things we could never imagine, like how hard the rain is falling in storms, and how high cloud tops stretch into the atmosphere.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Nature
Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths
Measurements of iron speciation in ancient rocks were used to construct the chemistry of ancient oceans. Analysis suggests that it took less oxygen than previously thought to trigger the appearance of complicated life forms.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Keep Tahoe blue? Less algae, not clarity, key for lake's blueness
The assumption that Lake Tahoe's blueness is tied to clarity has driven advocacy and management efforts in the Lake Tahoe Basin for decades. But the report's findings show that at times of the year when clarity increases, blueness decreases, and vice versa.
California Tahoe Conservancy, IVGID Waste Not Program, League to Save Lake Tahoe, Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation, Tahoe Area Sierra Club, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Lakefront Owners Association, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Tahoe Water Suppliers Association

Contact: Geoffrey Schladow
gschladow@ucdavis.edu
530-902-2272
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
The Condor
Reintroduced Channel Islands eagles thrive on a diet of seabirds and fish
Reintroducing a species into an area where it has vanished can be a great tool for conservation, but for reintroduction to be successful it's crucial to understand how the habitat has changed in the interim. A recent study examined the diet of reintroduced Bald Eagles in California's Channel Islands and compared it to the diet of the historical population, and the results show evidence of a healthy ecosystem bolstered by recent seabird conservation efforts.

Contact: Seth Newsome
newsome@unm.edu
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
ONR-sponsored technology aids recovery of Alaska plane wreck
Recently, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, US Air Force, Alaska Army National Guard and Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency used a portable weather station, developed with support from the Office of Naval Research, to monitor conditions at a 1952 crash site of a military transport aircraft.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Showing releases 181-190 out of 473.

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