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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 191-200 out of 310.

<< < 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 > >>

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Temperature and ecology: Rival Chilean barnacles keep competition cool
A lot of research shows that temperature can strongly influence species interactions and sometimes shape the appearance and functioning of biological communities. That's why a newly published finding that changes in temperature did not alter the competitive balance of power between two rival species of Chilean barnacles is an ecological surprise.
Fondo Nacional de Desarollo Cientifico y Tecnologico of Chile, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
What has happened to the tsunami debris from Japan?
The amount of debris in the ocean is growing exponentially, becoming more and more hazardous and harmful to marine life and therefore to our ocean food source. Measuring and tracking the movements of such debris are still in their infancy. The driftage generated by the tragic 2011 tsunami in Japan gave scientists Nikolai Maximenko and Jan Hafner a unique chance to learn about the effects of the ocean and wind on floating materials as they move across the North Pacific Ocean.
International Pacific Research Center, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, NASA, NOAA

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite saw extreme rainfall from Tropical Cyclone Guito
Tropical Cyclone Guito has been a powerful rainmaker, and fortunately, data from NASA's TRMM satellite shows that the heaviest rainfall has occurred over the open waters of the Mozambique Channel and not over land.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Diversity and Distributions
Legal harvest of marine turtles tops 42,000 each year
A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles -- and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
07-827-309-332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
What is El Nino Taimasa?
During a very strong El Nino, sea level can drop in the tropical western South Pacific and tides remain below normal for up to a year, especially around Samoa. Scientists at the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii, and the University of New South Wales, are studying the climate effects of this variation of El Nino, naming it 'El Nino Taimasa' after the wet stench of coral die-offs, called 'taimasa' by Samoans.
National Science Foundation, International Pacific Research Center, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, NASA, NOAA, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Biota Neotropica
Peru's Manu National Park sets new biodiversity record
When it comes to amphibian and reptile biodiversity, the eastern slopes of the Andes mountains in South America stand out. A new survey of 'herps' in and around Manu National Park in Peru by UC Berkeley postdoc Rudolf von May and his Illinois colleagues Alessandro Catenazzi and Edgar Lehr recorded a greater biodiversity -- 287 species, some new to science -- than any other protected area in the world, including the previous leader in Ecuador.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Ecology and Society
Surveys find that despite economic challenges Malagasy fishers support fishing regulations
Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and other groups have found that the fishing villages of Madagascar -- a country with little history of natural resource regulation -- are generally supportive of fishing regulations, an encouraging finding that bodes well for sustainable strategies needed to reduce poverty in the island nation.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
NASA satellite sees a ragged eye develop in Tropical Cyclone Guito
NASA satellite data was an 'eye opener' when it came to Tropical Cyclone 15S, now known as Guito in the Mozambique Channel today, Feb. 19, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Progress in Oceanography
Stratification determines the fate of fish stocks in the Baltic Sea
In the Baltic Sea, two cod stocks evolve independently. Also, the juveniles of two economically important flatfish species, flounder and plaice, live there within limited space. This is possible due to the different salinity within this inland sea. Scientists of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany and the National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark, explain how these hydrographic conditions affect the distribution of fish eggs and growth of economically important fish stocks.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nature
The ups and downs of early atmospheric oxygen
The period of extended low oxygen spanning from roughly two to less than one billion years ago was a time of remarkable chemical stability in the Earth's ocean and atmosphere. A University of California, Riverside team of biogeochemists reports that oxygen was much lower than previously thought during this important middle chapter in Earth history, which likely explains the low abundances and diversity of eukaryotic organisms and the absence of animals.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6397
University of California - Riverside

Showing releases 191-200 out of 310.

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