Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 196-205 out of 438.

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Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Biology Letters
Forgotten fossil indicates earlier origin of teeth
A tiny tooth plate of the 410 million year old fossil fish Romundina stellina indicates that teeth evolved earlier in the tree of life than recently thought.
EU Framework Programme 7, Natural Environment Research Council, Paul Scherrer Institut

Contact: Astrid Kromhout
astrid.kromhout@naturalis.nl
31-637-040-842
Naturalis Biodiversity Center

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Exceptional view of deep Arctic Ocean methane seeps
Close to 30.000 high definition images of the deep Arctic Ocean floor were captured on a recent research cruise. They give an exclusive insight into the most remote sites of natural methane release in the world.
Research Council of Norway

Contact: Maja Sojtaric
maja.sojtaric@uit.no
479-184-5151
CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Rainbow of glowing corals discovered in depths of the Red Sea
Glowing corals that display a surprising array of colors have been discovered in the deep water reefs of the Red Sea by scientists from the University of Southampton, UK, Tel Aviv University and the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, Israel, together with an international team of researchers.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
First species of yeti crab found in Antarctica named after British deep-sea biologist
The first species of yeti crab from hydrothermal vent systems of the East Scotia Ridge in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, has been described by a team of British scientists.
National Environment Research Council, Total Foundation

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
First species of yeti crab found in Antarctica
The first species of yeti crab from hydrothermal vent systems of the East Scotia Ridge in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, is described.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kujira move into the Gulf of Tonkin
Tropical Storm Kujira tracked over Hainan Island, China, and moved into the Gulf of Tonkin when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Scientists expect slightly below average Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' this summer
Scientists are expecting that this year's Chesapeake Bay hypoxic low-oxygen zone, also called the 'dead zone,' will be approximately 1.37 cubic miles -- about the volume of 2.3 million Olympic-size swimming pools. While still large, this is 10 percent lower than the long-term average as measured since 1950.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, University of Michigan, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
How will cold-loving Antarctic fish respond to warming ocean waters?
Climate change will be a real shock to Antarctic fishes' physiological systems, says Northeastern professor William Detrich. With a new NSF grant, he will study how rising ocean temperatures will affect the development of the embryos of these fish and the growth of juveniles after hatching.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jessica Caragher
j.caragher@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Scientific Reports
Survival of the gutless? Filter-feeders eject internal organs in response to stress
A recent Tel Aviv University study explores the ability of a common coral reef organism to eviscerate and regenerate its gut within 12 days and rebuild its filtration organ, the branchial sac, within 19 days. Understanding this process points to promising new directions in human soft tissue regeneration research.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Below-average 'dead zone' predicted for Chesapeake Bay in 2015
A University of Michigan researcher and his colleagues are forecasting a slightly below-average but still significant 'dead zone' this summer in the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary.

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Showing releases 196-205 out of 438.

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