Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 21-30 out of 490.

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Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Zootaxa
Scientists describe new clam species from depths off Canada's Atlantic coast
A new species of giant file clam from Atlantic Canadian waters has been described by Canadian scientists. The 'cryptic' clam, which lives in deepwater canyons, was first found off the coast of Newfoundland 30 years ago, but was thought to be the known European species. More recent collections off the coast of Nova Scotia, and subsequent DNA analysis coupled with detailed morphological studies established its identity as a distinct species -- Acesta cryptadelphe.

Contact: Dan Smythe
dsmythe@mus-nature.ca
613-566-4781
Canadian Museum of Nature

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evidence of ancient life discovered in mantle rocks deep below the seafloor
Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Virginia Tech, and University of Bremen. This first-time evidence was contained in drilled rock samples of Earth's mantle -- thrust by tectonic forces to the seafloor during the Early Cretaceous period. The discovery confirms a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: WHOI Media Relations
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea temperature changes linked to mystery North Pacific ecosystem shifts
Longer, less frequent climate fluctuations may be contributing to abrupt and unexplained ecosystem shifts in the North Pacific, according to a study by the University of Exeter.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
44-776-851-1866
University of Exeter

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Giant 'sea scorpion' fossil discovered
The fossil of a previously unknown species of 'sea scorpion,' measuring over 1.5 meters long, has been discovered in Iowa, USA, and described in the open-access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.

Contact: Joel Winston
Joel.Winston@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 29-Aug-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Erika dissipate near eastern Cuba
Satellite data from NOAA's GOES-East satellite was made into an animation that showed the demise of former Tropical Storm Erika as it neared eastern Cuba early on Aug. 29.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
NASA, NOAA satellites show Erika affecting Hispaniola
Tropical Storm Erika was centered in the Eastern Caribbean Sea and affecting Puerto Rico and Hispaniola when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead mid-day on Friday, Aug. 28, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Suomi NPP satellite sees rapidly intensifying Hurricane Jimena
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Hurricane Jimena in the Eastern Pacific and saw the strongest thunderstorms building up quickly, especially in the northern quadrant of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
NASA sees comma shaped Tropical Storm Kilo
Tropical Storm Kilo looks like a giant comma from space in imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite. Kilo continues to strengthen and was affecting Johnston Island as a tropical storm warning continued on Aug. 28.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
NASA's GPM sees heavy rain in Hurricane Ignacio
Hurricane Ignacio continued to strengthen as NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed its rainfall. Ignacio is forecast to move near Hawaii over the weekend of Aug. 29 and 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
Staying safe in sandy beaches
Beach sand contains all kinds of microorganisms, including those that can harm human health. Yet current guidelines are focused exclusively on monitoring the levels of microbes in the water. Now, an international panel of scientists is recommending monitoring the sand at recreational beaches, to minimize health risks for beachgoers. Their advice is based on the general consensus reached during the international conference 'Trends in Environmental Microbiology and Public Health,' held in Lisbon, Portugal, in September 2014.

Contact: Barbara Gutierrez
bgutierrez@miami.edu
305-284-3205
University of Miami

Showing releases 21-30 out of 490.

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