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Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 21-30 out of 390.

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Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Hydroelectric dams drastically reduce tropical forest biodiversity
Widely hailed as 'green' sources of renewable energy, hydroelectric dams have been built worldwide at an unprecedented scale. But University of East Anglia research reveals that these major infrastructure projects are far from environmentally friendly. A PLOS ONE study reveals the drastic effects of the major Amazonian Balbina Dam on tropical rainforest biodiversity. It reveals a loss of mammals, birds and tortoises from the vast majority of islands formed by the creation of the Balbina Lake.
Wildlife Conservation Society, Natural Environment Research Council, The Rufford Small Grant Foundation, Conservation Food and Health Foundation, Idea Wild, Amazon Region Protected Areas

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
Nature
Mitochondria, plastids evolved together into this single-celled plankton's 'eye'
Scientists have peered into the eye-like structure of single-celled marine plankton called warnowiids and found it contains many of the components of a complex eye.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Tula Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Seafood supply altered by climate change
The global supply of seafood is set to change substantially and many people will not be able to enjoy the same quantity and dishes in the future due to climate change and ocean acidification, according to UBC scientists.
The Nippon Foundation

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Location isn't everything but timing is for certain spawning fish
The larvae of some species of reef fish appear to survive better depending on the timing of when they were spawned, according to new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
802-253-2308
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
A win-win-win-win
With $1.5 million in NSF funding, a group of researchers will study the effects of a novel way of eradicating schistosomiasis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Suomi-NPP satellite sees formation of Tropical Depression Chan-Hom
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed over the newborn ninth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season on June 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
NASA sees new depression forms near Solomon Islands
The Southern Pacific Ocean Tropical Cyclone Season just got an extension with the birth of a new tropical depression near the Solomon Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
International Journal of Water
Water: The province of provinces
In a paper recently published in the International Journal of Water, civil engineering graduate Ryan Calder evaluates claims that more centralized US-style regulation of drinking water would improve outcomes for Canadians. The paper finds limited support for these claims but suggests they reflect deeply held Canadian political and cultural values.

Contact: Clea Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
514-848-2424
Concordia University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Water Resources Research
Water used for hydraulic fracturing varies widely across United States
The amount of water required to hydraulically fracture oil and gas wells varies widely across the country, according to the first national-scale analysis and map of hydraulic fracturing water usage detailed in a new study accepted for publication in Water Resources Research, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
ERC Advanced Grant: University of Southern Denmark sets out to explore deep ocean trenches
A team led by Professor Ronnie N. Glud from University of Southern Denmark has received an ERC Advanced Grant of 3,185,000 euros to carry out a series of ambitious explorations of the deepest parts of the oceans. Previous expeditions led by Professor Glud have revealed surprisingly high levels of biological activity at nearly 11 km deep. Now the aim is to investigate how life can exist at these depths and how its activity affects the biogeochemical functioning of the oceans and the Earth.
European Research Council

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
nyviden@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Showing releases 21-30 out of 390.

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