Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 21-30 out of 388.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Palaeontology
What life was like for newborn giant sea lizards during the age of the dinosaur
Many scientists have studied fossils from gigantic marine lizards called mosasaurs that lived at the time of the dinosaurs and flourished in ancient seas, but little is known about aspects of their breeding and birth. Investigators have gained new insights from young mosasaur specimens collected over 100 years ago that had previously been thought to belong to ancient marine birds. Their findings are published in Palaeontology.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science
Smithsonian's Panama debate fueled by zircon dating
New evidence published in Science by Smithsonian geologists dates the closure of an ancient seaway at 13 to 15 million years ago and challenges accepted theories about the rise of the Isthmus of Panama and its impact on world climate and animal migrations.

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Dynamic dead zones alter fish catches in Lake Erie
Lake Erie's dead zones are actually quite active, greatly affecting fish distributions, catch rates and the effectiveness of fishing gear.

Contact: Marisa Lubeck
mlubeck@usgs.gov
303-202-4765
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joalane's winds consolidate around its eye
The RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station provided data about Tropical Cyclone Joalane's surface winds that showed how the strongest sustained winds consolidated as the tropical cyclone intensified and developed an eye. As of April 9, warnings were in effect at Rodrigues Island in the Southern Indian Ocean as Joalane approached.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
'Warm blob' in Pacific Ocean linked to weird weather across the US
An unusually warm patch of surface water, nicknamed 'the blob' when it emerged in early 2014, is part of a Pacific Ocean pattern that may be affecting everything from West Coast fisheries and water supplies to East Coast snowstorms.
NOAA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Ferromanganese crusts record past climates
The onset of northern hemispheric glaciation cycles three million years ago has dramatically changed Arctic climate. Scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany have now for the first time reconstructed the history of Arctic climate based on records archived in ferromanganese crusts. The study, a collaboration with the United States Geological Survey and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, has now been published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

Contact: Dr. Andreas Villwock
presse@geomar.de
49-431-600-2802
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Deep Sea Research II
Dispersant used to clean Deepwater Horizon spill more toxic to corals than the oil
The dispersant used to remediate the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is more toxic to cold-water corals in lower concentrations than the spilled oil.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Preston M. Moretz
pmoretz@temple.edu
215-204-4380
Temple University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Road salt guidelines need review to protect food chain in lakes: York U study
The study, conducted in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, suggests that lake and highway authorities consider adjusting road salt use protocols to protect aquatic life such as the water flea, by taking the nutritional status of the lakes into account. In particular, the study suggests revising the Water Quality Guideline for chloride, especially for lakes near winter-maintained roads on the Canadian Shield that tend to have very low nutrient levels.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
suhasini@yorku.ca
416-736-4354
York University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Global Solutions to Regional Problems: Collecting Global Expertise to Address the Problem of Harmful
U-M researchers track the toxicity of Lake Erie cyanobacterial blooms
Efforts to reduce the amount of phosphorus and other nutrients washing off farm fields and into Lake Erie shifted into overdrive after high levels of a bacterial toxin shut down the drinking water supply to more than 400,000 Toledo-area residents last August.
University of Michigan Water Center

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science
Greatest mass extinction driven by acidic oceans, study finds
Changes to the Earth's oceans, caused by extreme volcanic activity, triggered the greatest extinction of all time, a study suggests.
International Centre for Carbonate Reservoirs, Natural Environment Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, German Research Foundation, Marsden Fund

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Edinburgh

Showing releases 21-30 out of 388.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>