Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 21-30 out of 282.

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Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
The electric eye of Cyclone Bansi
Though this image may look like they come from a science fiction movie, it is in fact a photograph of tropical cyclone Bansi as seen at night by astronauts on the International Space Station. The image was taken when the ISS was east of Madagascar.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nannofossils from El Hierro place the Canaries closer to Hawaii
Pieces of sediment from the Cretaceous period encased in lava floated to the surface with the underwater eruption of El Hierro in 2011, bringing scientists valuable data on the islands' ocean floor. The analysis of the materials matches the origin of the Canary Islands archipelago to the model of how Hawaii was formed and confirms that the oldest islands are found to the east and the youngest to the west.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Climate Change
Nordic marine scientists push for way forward
In a commentary released in Nature Climate Change, a group of 13 scientists argue that the Nordic countries are in a unique position to showcase how to handle the growing pressure on the oceans. However, this relies on a collective ability to regard change as connected.

Contact: Dr. Oyvind Paasche
oyvind.paasche@uib.no
47-930-48919
The University of Bergen

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
PLOS ONE
Smothered oceans
From the subarctic Pacific to the Chilean margins, extreme oxygen loss is stretching from the upper ocean to about 3,000 meters deep. In some oceanic regions, such loss occurred within 100 years or less, according to a UC Davis study.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Moffitt
semoffitt@ucdavis.edu
808-381-9177
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
ZooKeys
Into the dark: Two new encrusting anemones found in coral reef caves
Three marine biologists from Japan have discovered two new and unusually unique species of encrusting anemone. Unlike almost all known species within their genus, these two new species do not have light-harvesting symbiotic zooxanthellae, having lost them as they adapted to life in cracks and caves in shallow coral reefs. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Dr. James D. Reimer
jreimer@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp
81-988-958-542
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Global Change Biology
Ocean acidification changes balance of biofouling communities
A new study of marine organisms that make up the 'biofouling community' -- tiny creatures that attach themselves to ships' hulls and rocks in the ocean around the world -- shows how they adapt to changing ocean acidification. Reporting in the journal Global Change Biology, the authors examine how these communities may respond to future change.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Satellite study identifies water bodies important for biodiversity conservation
Using satellite images to study changing patterns of surface water is a powerful tool for identifying conservationally important 'stepping stone' water bodies that could help aquatic species survive in a drying climate, a UNSW Australia-led study shows. The approach has been applied to the Swan Coastal Plain near Perth in Western Australia, which has more than 1,500 water bodies and is one of 25 designated biodiversity hotspots on the globe.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-293-857-307
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Blind beetles show extraordinary signs of sight
University of Adelaide researchers have made a surprising discovery in the aquifers beneath the Western Australian desert, which challenges the traditional Darwinian view of evolution.

Contact: Dr. Simon Tierney
simon.tierney@adelaide.edu.au
61-040-737-0741
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
From Tar Sands to Ring of Fire -- forewarning changes to Canada's watersheds
Ecologists have found the conservation of aquatic ecosystems in Canada has not kept pace with the country's changing landscape, and a prioritization of protection is needed. This new assessment of environmental, human census and business pattern data shows climate warming and northward expansion of human activities over a decade, and can be used to guide strategies for managing freshwater resources by highlighting the regions where humans are now having the greatest impact.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
NASA spots heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Diamondra
The eighth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season has formed far from land, and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite saw some heavy rain east of the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 21-30 out of 282.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>