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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-210 out of 299.

<< < 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 > >>

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Pond-dwelling powerhouse's genome points to its biofuel potential
Duckweed is a tiny floating plant that's been known to drive people daffy. It's one of the smallest and fastest-growing flowering plants that often becomes a hard-to-control weed in ponds and small lakes. But it's also been exploited to clean contaminated water and as a source to produce pharmaceuticals. Now, the genome of Greater Duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) has given this miniscule plant's potential as a biofuel source a big boost.
DOE/Office of Science, Selman Waksman Chair in Molecular Genetics

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Mechanisms of Development
Research of zebrafish neurons may lead to understanding of birth defects like spina bifida
Using zebrafish, scientists can determine how individual neurons develop, mature and support basic functions like breathing, swallowing and jaw movement. Researchers at the University of Missouri say that learning about neuronal development and maturation in zebrafish could lead to a better understanding of birth defects such as spina bifida in humans.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 15S form in the Mozambique Channel
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 15S as it formed in the Mozambique Channel on Feb. 18 and the AIRS instrument aboard gathered infrared data on its cloud top temperatures and potential.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Scientific Reports
A battery small enough to be injected, energetic enough to track salmon
Scientists have created a microbattery that packs twice the energy compared to current microbatteries used to monitor the movements of salmon. The battery is just slightly larger than a long grain of rice and can be injected into an organism.
US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Press conference announcement; sending press kits; press registration
This release focuses on the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Press conference announcement; Sending press kits to Hawaii; Press registration.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Sloan Research Fellowships awarded to 126 young scholars
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding US and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships are given to early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Nate Williams
williams@sloan.org
212-649-1692
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Increase in Arctic cyclones is linked to climate change, new study shows
A new study in Geophysical Research Letters uses historical climate model simulations to demonstrate that there has been an Arctic-wide decrease in sea level pressure since the 1800's.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
PLOS ONE
Dartmouth-UConn study shows coastal water, not sediment, predicts mercury contamination
A Dartmouth-University of Connecticut study of the northeast United States shows that methylmercury concentrations in estuary waters -- not in sediment as commonly thought -- are the best way to predict mercury contamination in the marine food chain.
NIH/National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient herring catch nets fisheries weakness
Archaeological data indicate modern herring management needs to take a longer look into the past to manage fisheries for the future says a new study involving Simon Fraser University researchers. That is one of the key findings in the study, just published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. SFU researchers Iain McKechnie, Dana Lepofsky and Ken Lertzman, and scientists in Ontario, Alberta and the United States are its co-authors.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
Coral Reefs
Do Guam mantas plan moon parties?
Guam mantas will be forever mentioned in the scientific literature because of UOG Master of Biology candidate Julie Hartup's passion for her research subject. She has been studying Guam's Manta alfredi for eight years and is the first to document a very interesting behavior, mantas eating fish spawn.

Contact: Olympia Terral
olympia.uog@gmail.com
University of Guam

Showing releases 201-210 out of 299.

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