Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-210 out of 394.

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Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science
New insights into global ocean microbe-virus interactions, drivers of Earth's ecosystems
Ocean microbes are vital to the Earth's ecosystems, and their interactions with ocean viruses can have dramatic effects on processes ranging from oxygen production to food supply. A UA-led international team has uncovered new information about the way marine viruses and microbes interact on a global scale, which may allow researchers to predictively model their complex interactions. The study is featured in a special issue of Science covering work from the Tara Oceans Expeditions.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Scientists announce top 10 new species for 2015
A cartwheeling spider, a bird-like dinosaur and a fish that wriggles around on the sea floor to create a circular nesting site are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry as the Top 10 New Species for 2015.

Contact: Claire B. Dunn
cbdunn@esf.edu
315-470-6650
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science
Sudden onset of ice loss in Antarctica detected
A group of scientists, led by a team from the University of Bristol, UK has observed a sudden increase of ice loss in a previously stable region of Antarctica. The research is published today in Science.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 20-May-2015
The Auk
Arctic ducks combine nutrients from wintering and breeding grounds to grow healthy eggs
It takes a lot of nutrients to build an egg. One of the big questions among researchers who study the eggs of migratory birds is where those nutrients come from -- does the mother make the egg directly out of what she eats during the breeding season, or does she save up nutrients consumed on her wintering grounds? The answer appears to be both for Common Eiders, large, sea-going ducks that breed in the Arctic.

Contact: Keith Hobson
keith.hobson@ec.gc.ca
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Public Release: 20-May-2015
NASA sees Extra-Tropical Storm Dolphin moving toward Sea of Okhotsk
Tropical Storm Dolphin transitioned into an extra-tropical storm and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm on its way toward the Sea of Okhotsk.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-May-2015
NASA analyzed the winds of Tropical Storm Ana
In mid-May 2015, Ana became the first named tropical storm of the North Atlantic hurricane season. May is early to see large storms in the Atlantic; the season begins in earnest on June 1.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-May-2015
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Surviving harsh environments becomes a death-trap for specialist corals
The success of corals that adapt to survive in the world's hottest sea could contribute to their demise through global warming, according to new research.
Natural Environment Research Council, European Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
Offshore wind turbine construction could be putting seals' hearing at risk
Noise from pile driving during offshore wind turbine construction could be damaging the hearing of harbour seals around the UK, according to ecologists who attached GPS data loggers to 24 harbor seals while offshore wind turbines were being installed in 2012. Data on the seals' locations and their diving behaviour was combined with information from the wind farm developers on when pile driving was taking place. Models revealed that half of the tagged seals were exposed to noise levels that exceeded hearing damage thresholds.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 20-May-2015
PLOS ONE
Deepwater Horizon oil spill contributed to high number of Gulf dolphin deaths
As part of an unusual mortality event investigation, a team of scientists has discovered that dead bottlenose dolphins stranded in the northern Gulf of Mexico since the start of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have lung and adrenal lesions consistent with petroleum product exposure according to a paper published today in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE.
Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Seeing without eyes
The skin of the California two-spot octopus can sense light even without input from the central nervous system.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Showing releases 201-210 out of 394.

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