Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-210 out of 486.

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Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Journal of Heredity
Finding the 'conservación' in conservation genetics
A recently published special issue of the Journal of Heredity focuses on case studies of real-world applications of conservation genetics in Latin America, from nabbing parrot smugglers to exposing fraudulent fish sales.

Contact: Nancy Steinberg
nsteinberg@charter.net
American Genetic Association

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sardines, anchovies, other fast-growing fish vulnerable to dramatic population plunges
A Rutgers marine biologist studying the rise and fall of fish populations worldwide recently made a counterintuitive discovery: ocean species that grow quickly and reproduce frequently are more likely to experience dramatic plunges in population than larger, slower growing fish such as sharks or tuna. In nearly all of the cases, overfishing was the culprit. Combining climate variability with high levels of fishing greatly increases the risk of population collapse.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Seagrass thrives surprisingly well in toxic sediments -- but still dies all over the world
Toxic is bad. Or is it? New studies of seagrasses reveal that they are surprisingly good at detoxifying themselves when growing in toxic seabed. But if seagrasses are stressed by their environment, they lose the ability and die. All over the world seagrasses are increasingly stressed and one factor contributing to this can be lack of detoxification.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
eLife
Fish that have their own fish finders
African fish called mormyrids communicate by means of electric signals. Fish in one group can glean detailed information from a signal's waveform, but fish in another group are insensitive to waveform variations. Research at Washington University in St. Louis has uncovered the neurological basis for this difference in perception.

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Low levels of endocrine disruptors in the environment may cause sex reversal in female frogs
Many studies have been conducted on the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals that mimic or block estrogen, the primary female hormone. Now new research shows that similar harm can be done by chemicals that affect male hormones, or androgens.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Shifting winds, ocean currents doubled endangered Galápagos penguin population
Shifting winds, ocean currents doubled endangered Galápagos penguin population

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature Climate Change
Greenhouse gases' millennia-long ocean legacy
Continuing current carbon dioxide emission trends throughout this century and beyond would leave a legacy of heat and acidity in the deep ocean. These changes would linger even if the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration were to be restored to pre-industrial levels at some point in the future, according to a new paper. This is due to the tremendous inertia of the ocean system.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean changes are affecting salmon biodiversity and survival
What happens at the Equator, doesn't stay at the Equator. El Niño-associated changes in the ocean may be putting the biodiversity of two Northern Pacific salmon species at risk, according to a UC Davis study.
National Science Foundation, National Marine Fisheries Service/Sea Grant

Contact: Patrick Kilduff
dpkilduff@ucdavis.edu
530-304-7257
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature Climate Change
CO2 removal cannot save the oceans -- if we pursue business as usual
Greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities do not only cause rapid warming of the seas, but also ocean acidification at an unprecedented rate. Artificial carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed to reduce both risks to marine life. A new study based on computer calculations now shows that this strategy would not work if applied too late. CDR cannot compensate for soaring business-as-usual emissions throughout the century and beyond.

Contact: Sarah Messina or Mareike Schodder
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature
Earliest evidence of reproduction in a complex organism
A new study of 565 million-year-old fossils has identified how some of the first complex organisms on Earth -- possibly some of the first animals to exist -- reproduced, revealing the origins of our modern marine environment.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Showing releases 201-210 out of 486.

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