Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 206-215 out of 491.

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Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Shifting winds, ocean currents doubled endangered Galápagos penguin population
Shifting winds, ocean currents doubled endangered Galápagos penguin population

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature Climate Change
Greenhouse gases' millennia-long ocean legacy
Continuing current carbon dioxide emission trends throughout this century and beyond would leave a legacy of heat and acidity in the deep ocean. These changes would linger even if the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration were to be restored to pre-industrial levels at some point in the future, according to a new paper. This is due to the tremendous inertia of the ocean system.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean changes are affecting salmon biodiversity and survival
What happens at the Equator, doesn't stay at the Equator. El Niño-associated changes in the ocean may be putting the biodiversity of two Northern Pacific salmon species at risk, according to a UC Davis study.
National Science Foundation, National Marine Fisheries Service/Sea Grant

Contact: Patrick Kilduff
dpkilduff@ucdavis.edu
530-304-7257
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature Climate Change
CO2 removal cannot save the oceans -- if we pursue business as usual
Greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities do not only cause rapid warming of the seas, but also ocean acidification at an unprecedented rate. Artificial carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed to reduce both risks to marine life. A new study based on computer calculations now shows that this strategy would not work if applied too late. CDR cannot compensate for soaring business-as-usual emissions throughout the century and beyond.

Contact: Sarah Messina or Mareike Schodder
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature
Earliest evidence of reproduction in a complex organism
A new study of 565 million-year-old fossils has identified how some of the first complex organisms on Earth -- possibly some of the first animals to exist -- reproduced, revealing the origins of our modern marine environment.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Septic tanks aren't keeping poo out of rivers and lakes
The notion that septic tanks prevent fecal bacteria from seeping into rivers and lakes simply doesn't hold water, says a new Michigan State University study. Water expert Joan Rose and her team of water detectives have discovered freshwater contamination stemming from septic systems.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Mackenzie Kastl
mackenzie.kastl@cabs.msu.edu
517-884-8048
Michigan State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Journal of Physical Oceanography
Study offers new insights on hurricane intensity, pollution transport
As tropical storm Isaac was gaining momentum toward the Mississippi River in August 2012, University of Miami researchers were dropping instruments from the sky above to study the ocean conditions beneath the storm. The newly published study showed how a downwelling of warm waters deepened the storm's fuel tank for a rapid intensification toward hurricane status. The results also revealed how hurricane-generated currents and ocean eddies can transport oil and other pollutants to coastal regions.
BP/Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative to the Deep-C consortium at Florida State University

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research spotlights a previously unknown microbial 'drama' playing in the Southern Ocean
A team of marine researchers funded by the National Science Foundation has discovered a three-way conflict raging at the microscopic level in the frigid waters off Antarctica over natural resources such as vitamins and iron.

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Journal of Lipid Research
Penn study questions presence in blood of heart-healthy molecules from fish oil supplements
A new study questions the relevance of fish oil-derived substances and their purported anti-inflammatory effects in humans.
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, American Heart Association, Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Global Ecology and Conservation
Bering Sea hotspot for corals and sponges
North of the Aleutian Islands, submarine canyons in the cold waters of the eastern Bering Sea contain a highly productive 'green belt' that is home to deep-water corals as well as a plethora of fish and marine mammals.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Showing releases 206-215 out of 491.

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