EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
Read the latest marine science news
Blub blub blub Explore the most comprehensive inventory of known marine life: Census of Marine Life. This resource is provided by the Census of Marine Life.
Crabs Dolphin Fish Fish Seal Shark Squid Research Submarine Vent Seal and Orca

Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
Multimedia Gallery
Red Sponge Photo
Marine Science Resources

Seal Photo
Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

Submit a Calendar Item

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 206-215 out of 308.

<< < 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 > >>

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Sloan Research Fellowships awarded to 126 young scholars
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding US and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships are given to early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Nate Williams
williams@sloan.org
212-649-1692
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Increase in Arctic cyclones is linked to climate change, new study shows
A new study in Geophysical Research Letters uses historical climate model simulations to demonstrate that there has been an Arctic-wide decrease in sea level pressure since the 1800's.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
PLOS ONE
Dartmouth-UConn study shows coastal water, not sediment, predicts mercury contamination
A Dartmouth-University of Connecticut study of the northeast United States shows that methylmercury concentrations in estuary waters -- not in sediment as commonly thought -- are the best way to predict mercury contamination in the marine food chain.
NIH/National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient herring catch nets fisheries weakness
Archaeological data indicate modern herring management needs to take a longer look into the past to manage fisheries for the future says a new study involving Simon Fraser University researchers. That is one of the key findings in the study, just published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. SFU researchers Iain McKechnie, Dana Lepofsky and Ken Lertzman, and scientists in Ontario, Alberta and the United States are its co-authors.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
Coral Reefs
Do Guam mantas plan moon parties?
Guam mantas will be forever mentioned in the scientific literature because of UOG Master of Biology candidate Julie Hartup's passion for her research subject. She has been studying Guam's Manta alfredi for eight years and is the first to document a very interesting behavior, mantas eating fish spawn.

Contact: Olympia Terral
olympia.uog@gmail.com
University of Guam

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists call for new stewardship of the deep ocean: Earth's last frontier
Humans are encroaching more vigorously into the ocean's deep regions, exploiting its resources and putting its habitats and natural services at risk. Lisa Levin of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego believes a new "stewardship mentality" across disciplines is required for the future health and integrity of the deep ocean. Levin and several other experts will describe this need Feb. 16 during a news briefing and symposium at the AAAS meeting in Chicago.
Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative, Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at Scripps

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Deep ocean needs policy, stewardship where it never existed
Plans to begin mining nodules of valuable metals from deep ocean deposits have oceanographers concerned about the lack of public awareness or international agreements governing these habitats. "The deep sea is out of sight, out of mind ... there's a whole level of concern that isn't being expressed when it comes to deep sea industrialization," said Cindy Van Dover of the Duke Marine Lab.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Crab nebula of life
Researchers Chu, et.al., have constructed the most complete and extensive crab sequence dataset to date. Their recalibrated crab gene tree using DNA and mitochondrial sequences from 140 species and 58 crab families provides some important new insights into the timing and diversity of crab evolution.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
MBEpress@gmail.com
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Arctic biodiversity under serious threat from climate change according to new report
Climate change caused by human activities is by far the worst threat to biodiversity in the Arctic. Some of these changes are already visible. Unique and irreplaceable Arctic wildlife and landscapes are crucially at risk due to global warming caused by human activities according to the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment, a new report prepared by 253 scientists from 15 countries under the auspices of the Arctic Council.
Danish EPA

Contact: DSc. Hans Meltofte
mel@dmu.dk
45-29-88-92-78
Aarhus University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Scientists discover the mechanism of heart failure in fish exposed to oil spills
Researchers from NOAA Fisheries and Stanford University, working on the Natural Resources Damage Assessment following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, have found that some petroleum compounds act as ion channel blockers in the heart cells of young tuna, disrupting normal cardiac function. This will lead to the creation of new diagnostic tools for measuring the biological impact of pollution, and may have implications for the health of vertebrates other than fish as well.
NOAA, and others

Contact: Rich Press
rich.press@noaa.gov
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Showing releases 206-215 out of 308.

<< < 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science