Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video:Using state-of-the-art GPS-linked satellite tags, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Large Pelagic Research Center are tracking the complex migration habits of leatherback sea turtles. See them in action here and read about their efforts on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 216-225 out of 382.

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Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Diversity and Distributions
Critical green turtle habitats identified in Mediterranean
A new study led by the University of Exeter has identified two major foraging grounds of the Mediterranean green turtle and recommends the creation of a new Marine Protected Area to preserve the vulnerable species.

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
How much plastic debris moves from land to sea?
Researchers suggest that the world's coastal communities generated close to 275 million tons of plastic waste in 2010 -- and that 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of that plastic made its way to the oceans. They also warn that the cumulative amount of ocean-bound plastic could increase more than tenfold in the next ten years unless global infrastructure is improved.
The Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New study in Science calculates amount of plastic waste going into the ocean
The study, co-authored by Kara Lavender Law of Sea Education Association and principal investigator of the NCEAS marine debris working group, reported in the Feb. 13 edition of the journal Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline. That year, a total of 275 million metric tons of plastic waste was generated in those 192 coastal countries.

Contact: Kara Lavender Law
klavender@sea.edu
508-444-1935
Sea Education Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Science
New Science paper calculates magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean
How much mismanaged plastic waste is making its way from land to ocean has been a decades-long guessing game. Now, the University of Georgia's Jenna Jambeck and her National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis working group colleagues have put a number on the global problem. Their study, reported in Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline.
Marine Debris Working Group at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Cell
A new model organism for aging research: The short-lived African killifish
Studying aging and its associated diseases has been challenging because existing vertebrate models (e.g., mice) are relatively long lived, while short-lived invertebrate species (e.g., yeast and worms) lack key features present in humans. Stanford University scientists have found a new middle ground with the development of a genome-editing toolkit to study aging in the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Automatic Whale Detector, version 1.0
Scientists have combined infrared cameras with image recognition software to automatically detect and count migrating gray whales. This technology will increase the accuracy of gray whale abundance estimates.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Rich Press
rich.press@noaa.gov
301-427-8530
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Earth's Future
Monster hurricanes reached US Northeast during prehistoric periods of ocean warming
Intense hurricanes possibly more powerful than any storms New England has experienced in recorded history frequently pounded the region during the first millennium, from the peak of the Roman Empire into the height of the Middle Ages, according to a new study. The findings could have implications for the intensity and frequency of hurricanes that the US East and Gulf coasts could experience as ocean temperatures increase as a result of climate change.
National Science Foundation, Risk Prediction Initiative at the Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences, DOE/National Institute for Climate Change Research, NOAA, Dalio Explore

Contact: Peter Weiss
pweiss@agu.org
202-777-7507
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Depression Higos sheared apart
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Tropical Depression Higos and saw wind shear is literally pushing the storm apart.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nature
Carbon release from ocean helped end the Ice Age
A release of carbon dioxide from the deep ocean helped bring an end to the last Ice Age, according to new collaborative research by the University of Southampton, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the Australian National University, and international colleagues.

Contact: Patrizia Ziveri
Patrizia.ziveri@uab.cat
34-935-868-974
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Making a better wound dressing -- with fish skin
With a low price tag and mild flavor, tilapia has become a staple dinnertime fish for many Americans. Now it could have another use: helping to heal our wounds. In the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists have shown that a protein found in this fish can promote skin repair in rats without an immune reaction, suggesting possible future use for human patients.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 216-225 out of 382.

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