Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 221-230 out of 392.

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Public Release: 11-Mar-2016
Journal of Archaeological Science
Satellites and shipwrecks: Landsat satellite spots foundered ships in coastal waters
Using data from the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite, researchers have detected plumes extending as far as 4 kilometers (about 2.5 miles) downstream from shallow shipwreck sites.
NASA, USGS

Contact: Rani Gran
Rani.c.gran@nasa.gov
301-286-2483
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
GSA Bulletin
Evidence in the Cassia Hills of Idaho reveals 12 catastrophic eruptions
Ancient super-eruptions west of Yellowstone, USA, were investigated by an international initiative to examine the frequency of massive volcanic events. Yellowstone famously erupted cataclysmically in recent times, but these were just the latest of a longer succession of huge explosive eruptions that burned a track from Oregon eastward toward Yellowstone during the past 16 million years.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Science
Conservation sea change
Beyond the breakers, the ocean is like the Wild West. While not completely lawless, its vastness and remoteness make it hard to observe and more difficult to manage human activity.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Small brain is good for the immune system -- if you are a fish
Having a small brain may provide immune benefits, at least if you are a guppy. A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society shows that guppies with smaller brains have stronger immune responses than guppies with larger brains.

Contact: Alexander Kotrschal, Department of Zoology, Stockholm Univer
alexander.kotrschal@zoologi.su.se
0046-765-751-661
Stockholm University

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Environmental Research Letters
Using statistics to predict rogue waves
Scientists have developed a mathematical model to derive the probability of extreme waves. This model uses multi-point statistics, the joint statistics of multiple points in time or space, to predict how likely extreme waves are. The results, published today, Friday, March 11, in the New Journal of Physics, demonstrate that evolution of these probabilities obey a well-known function, greatly reducing the complexity of the results.

Contact: Steve Pritchard
steve.pritchard@iop.org
01-179-301-032
IOP Publishing

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
PLOS ONE
Major source of methanol in the ocean identified
As one of the most abundant organic compounds on the planet, methanol occurs naturally in the environment as plants release it as they grow and decompose. It is also found in the ocean, where it is a welcome food source for ravenous microbes that feast on it for energy and growth.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
IEEE Winter Conference on Computer Vision
Disney researchers take depth cameras into the depths for high-accuracy 3-D capture
Disney Research scientists are adapting low-cost depth-sensing cameras for use underwater, with the goal of capturing 3-D models of marine flora and fauna with a high degree of accuracy.

Contact: Jennifer Liu
jennifer.c.liu@disney.com
Disney Research

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
DNA Research
The turbot: The first vertebrate to be sequenced in Spain
The first vertebrate to be genetically sequenced in Spain, the Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), has a much more highly developed sense of sight than other fish, since it has evolved in order to adapt itself to the lack of light on the sea bed. In addition, its genes show us that the levels of fat in its cellular membranes are far higher than in other species, so as to be able to withstand the low water temperatures in its habitat.

Contact: Alda Ólafsson
alda.olafsson@csic.es
34-915-681-499
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
Nature Genetics
Spotted Gar genome links humans to vertebrate ancestry
The Spotted Gar is an unusual fish whose genome sequence has been released in a recent study highlighted in Nature Genetics. This fish has surprising genetic similarities and ancestral qualities which are informative about the evolution of many vertebrate animals -- including humans.

Contact: Hayley London
hayley.london@tgac.ac.uk
01-603-450-107
The Genome Analysis Centre

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
BioScience
Overfishing devastates spawning aggregations
Because they are easier to catch and potentially more threatened by nonlethal effects, fish that form spawning aggregations are at particular risk when those aggregations are heavily fished. To address the threat, precautionary management principles that limit or prohibit fishing on spawning aggregations must be implemented.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Showing releases 221-230 out of 392.

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