Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-235 out of 389.

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Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Equatorial fish babies in hot water
Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
GeoBiology
New research identifies diverse sources of methane in shallow Arctic lakes
New research into the changing ecology of thousands of shallow lakes on the North Slope of Alaska suggests that in scenarios of increasing global temperatures, methane-generating microbes, found in thawing lake sediments, may ramp up production of the potent greenhouse gas -- which has a global warming potential 25 times greater than carbon dioxide.
NASA/Astrobiology Institute, Astrobiology of Icy Worlds Program, NASA/Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets Award

Contact: Justin Broglio
justin.broglio@dri.edu
775-673-7610
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea change: What took decades to destroy in oceans took millennia to recover
While climate change and the deoxygenation of seawater can alter ocean ecology very quickly, recovery can be on a 1,000-year scale, not the 100-year scale previously thought.
National Science Foundation, EPA STAR Fellowship, Switzer Environmental Fellowship

Contact: Sarah Moffitt
semoffitt@ucdavis.edu
808-381-9177
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Water and Environment Journal
Glow in the dark tampons identify sewage pollution in rivers
Tampons may not be an obvious scientific tool, but engineers from the University of Sheffield in the UK have been using them to identify where waste water from baths, washing machines, sinks and showers is polluting our rivers and streams.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Abigail Chard
abigail@campuspr.co.uk
44-113-258-9880
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Spring plankton bloom hitches ride to sea's depths on ocean eddies
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event --a massive bloom of microscopic plants, or phytoplankton -- unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Fisheries Research
Pacific-wide study reveals striped marlins' preferred habitat, may help avoid overfishing
Using the largest tagging data set to date, lead author Chi Hin 'Tim' Lam of UMass Amherst's Large Pelagics Research Center in Gloucester, Mass., with colleagues at USC Los Angeles and the Marine Conservation Science Institute of Waikoloa, Hawaii, show that across the Pacific Ocean the vertical habitat of striped marlin is defined by the light-penetrated, uppermost part of the ocean known as the epipelagic layer, within eight degrees Celsius of sea surface temperature.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Biology Letters
Coorong fish hedge their bets for survival
Analysis of the ear bones of the River Murray estuarine fish black bream has revealed how these fish 'hedge their bets' for population survival.

Contact: Bronwyn Gillanders
bronwyn.gillanders@adelaide.edu.au
61-417-036-235
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones Coral trout in protected 'green zones' are not only bigger and more abundant than those in fished 'blue zones' of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, but they are also better able to cope with cyclone damage, according to a long-term study published today in Current Biology.

Contact: Niall Byrne
niall@scienceinpublic.com.au
61-417-131-977
Australian Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Swirling currents deliver phytoplankton carbon to ocean depths
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event -- a massive phytoplankton bloom -- unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic. But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning
A new study published by Science and led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change. Data from nearly two decades of satellite missions have shown that the ice volume decline is accelerating.
NASA

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 226-235 out of 389.

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