Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 226-235 out of 390.

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Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find
An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. In a new study published March 6 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by University of Georgia ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Gavrilles
bethgav@uga.edu
706-542-7247
University of Georgia

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Menopausal whales are influential and informative leaders
Menopause is a downright bizarre trait among animals. It's also rare. Outside of the human species, only the female members of two whale species outlive their reproductive lives in such a major way. Female killer whales typically become mothers between the ages of 12 and 40, but they can live for more than 90 years. Males rarely make it past 50. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology have new evidence to explain why.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Old mothers know best: Killer whale study sheds light on the evolution of menopause
A new study led by the Universities of Exeter and York has shown that female killer whales survive after menopause because they help their family members find food during hard times. This research provides insights into why women continue to live long after they can no longer have children.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-787-943-3087
University of Exeter

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
James Cook University in major study on rapid fish acclimatization
A JCU team from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has been granted more than $600,000 to find out why fish exposed to high water temperatures have offspring that are born already acclimatized to the high temperatures.
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
61-747-814-942
James Cook University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
Scientists question rush to build Nicaragua canal
A consortium of environmental scientists including Rice University's Pedro Alvarez has expressed strong concern about the impact of a controversial Central American canal across Nicaragua.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
NSU researchers discover hurricanes helped accelerate spread of lionfish
NSU researchers studied the correlation between hurricanes and spread of invasive species, lionfish, due to changes in ocean currents.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Usual prey gone, a fish survives by changing predictably
Without the Bahamas mosquitofish to eat, bigmouth sleepers slide down the food chain and survive on insects, snails and crustaceans. And, in so doing, sleepers' behaviors, ratio of males to females and physical appearance change, too.
National Science Foundation, University of Oklahoma, North Carolina State University

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Quaternary Science Reviews
New data provided by seabed sediments on the climate within the Mediterranean basin
An international team of scientists which included three University of Granada and the Andalusian Institute of Earth Sciences researchers (a joint UGR-CISC center) have found new data on the weather in the Mediterranean basin over the course of the past 20.000 years thanks to the chemical composition of sediments deposited in its seabed.

Contact: Francisca Martínez Ruiz
fmruiz@ugr.es
0034-958-230-000
University of Granada

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Animal functional diversity started out poor, became richer over time
The finding refutes a hypothesis by the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen J. Gould that marine creatures underwent an 'early burst' of functional diversity during the dawn of animal life.

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Geology
Lightning plus volcanic ash makes glass
In their open-access paper for Geology, Kimberly Genareau and colleagues propose, for the first time, a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcanic lightning. The existence of fulgurites -- glassy products formed in rocks and sediments struck by cloud-to-ground lightning -- provide direct evidence that geologic materials can be melted via natural lightning occurrence.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Showing releases 226-235 out of 390.

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